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Scott.Rapp

Question about the craftsman belt sander 2x42

11 posts in this topic

I was reading about this in another thread - don't remember whose thread it was, but thanks for pointing it out...

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/3-4-hp-cont-duty-DC-mo...0QQcmdZViewItem

 

Would this work with the craftsman 2x42 belt sander? I was thinking it would be cheaper to simply upgrade the 2x42 with that if possible, than laying out the bigger bucks for a really nice adjustable. From what I understand ... having single speed (especially high speed) makes it really hard to grind out the bevels...

 

So would this work?

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This sander has kinda of a medium speed factory if you where going to spend that much money on it i would buy a grizzly grinder and a step pulley.

72" belts last longer and they are the same price if not cheaper not to mention you are getting a much larger motor with the grizzly.

 

The craftsman gets the job done but i wouldn't spend a bunch of time upgrading it. i use this grinder for all my knives and after using a few real grinders while i was in Europe (thanks Dan and Owen!) i gotta say its hard to go back.....

 

another option if you are set on the variable motor is the coote grinder for 400 and then get the motor! this is also a damn fine machine i have used one a few different times.

 

Hope this helps

 

~~DJ

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This sander has kinda of a medium speed factory if you where going to spend that much money on it i would buy a grizzly grinder and a step pulley.

72" belts last longer and they are the same price if not cheaper not to mention you are getting a much larger motor with the grizzly.

 

The craftsman gets the job done but i wouldn't spend a bunch of time upgrading it. i use this grinder for all my knives and after using a few real grinders while i was in Europe (thanks Dan and Owen!) i gotta say its hard to go back.....

 

another option if you are set on the variable motor is the coote grinder for 400 and then get the motor! this is also a damn fine machine i have used one a few different times.

 

Hope this helps

 

~~DJ

 

I would much prefer to get a real grinder. However, since the craftsman was a gift, and I certainly don't have the money to upgrade that much ... would this one on eBay work for now? I could always remove that motor later and buy a real grinder to stick it on, couldn't I?

 

Thanks for the advice!

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Scott, I think that the money that you would spend on one of those units would be better used if it was put into a savings account to buy a real grinder at a later time. I got a motor off Ebay for less than what one of those units cost and I saved up until I could get a Coote. That is a big chunk of change to invest in something that will never be anything but a make-do tool. Also I noticed that that set up will loose torc as the motor is slowed and it's only starting out with three quarters of horse power. That's a little anemic for a grinder. It wouldn't take much pressure at low speeds to stop it.

 

Doug Lester

Edited by Doug Lester

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Scott, I think that the money that you would spend on one of those units would be better used if it was put into a savings account to buy a real grinder at a later time. I got a motor off Ebay for less than what one of those units cost and I saved up until I could get a Coote. That is a big chunk of change to invest in something that will never be anything but a make-do tool. Also I noticed that that set up will loose torc as the motor is slowed and it's only starting out with three quarters of horse power. That's a little anemic for a grinder. It wouldn't take much pressure at low speeds to stop it.

 

Doug Lester

 

Alright - that makes sense about the lower speeds. Thanks for your input, I guess I'll start saving!

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Ok ... going by what you said about adjustable ... and because I'm still "power tool stupid" ... is that not a good idea?

 

I'm trying to figure out how these things work. If I don't want adjustable speed on the motor, do I just use different size wheels in order to speed or slow the grinder?

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There are multiple ways to get variable speeds, one is a Variable speed DC motor and electronics to drive it (Very expensive) or you could do like the KMG does and use a multiple pulley motor going to a jackshaft that runs the grinder. beaumontmetalworks Look at the photo of the grinder in the upper right.

Also its important you do your homework before you purchase a AC motor, as some come in 1800rpm and some in 3600rpm. Depending on which one you buy you might need different pulleys to get your desired speeds.

If money is an issue do the multiple pulley motor going to the grinder if possible.

Chris

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Scott, if someone doesn't snipe that at the last minute or drive the price way up I'd say that it is worth the chance. The motor that I bought had the same features. You will have to step the speed down by 1/2 to use it or it will feed the belt at too many sfpm. I run a 1 1/2" pulley on my motor and a 5 1/2" pulley on my Coote. That cuts my speed to just under 800 sfpm with a 10" drive wheel. I did that to keep the blade cooler when grinding it with finer grit. It also slows down how fast the courser grit belts remove steel.

 

You can get electric motors that you can reduce the speeds on without loosing torc. If you check the catalogs you will notice that they are a bit on the pricy side. That seller states that he may be able to provide one. It will cost you more than the unit that he has advertised but it could run for less than what the supply house charge for a new unit. Don't feel bad about being a newbie where power tools are concerned. I once thought that a 4X36" belt sander was ok. (let me add that there are a few out there that got adiquate service out of one, but most won't)

 

Doug Lester

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I once thought that a 4X36" belt sander was ok.

 

I bought one of those too. :rolleyes: I do get some use out of it for flattening surfaces though.

 

My other grinder is a 1x42. I REALLY wish I had a 2xanything. The slightest little wiggle on a pass and the edge of the belt puts deep cuts in the blade. I think a wider belt would be easier to stay flat on and and a little more forgiving.

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I had one as my first grinder,hated it!!!!Had a grizzly,then a highly modified grizzly variable speed,and now have a kmg.I LOVE my kmg.My story of multiple grinders is all to common.Buy something good so you wont have to update.If a kmg is immpossible then buy the plans for The No Welding Required Grinder found on this forum as well as Bladeforums and the knife network.They are a kmg clone using a bolt together design.Total cost I believe is around 200-250 dollars with motor.I have read many many posts from satisfied customers.

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