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Glenn Moulton

Two, framed handles

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I had the opportunity to spend a great weekend with Jim along with several more guys from our local group a while back.It was a very busy weekend as he was showing us framed handles, how to fit the guards and such.We all started out forging blades intending to finish them but I helped a late comer forge his first and finally got the one I started home and finished.Ive done another since and thought I'd show you guys.The later is the one I started at Jim's.

owie.jpg

woodie.jpg

 

Jim is a one of a kind guy.I thank Don for introducing us!

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Classic knives, Glenn. I really like the coffin handle.

 

Me too. You're a lucky guy to live close to Jim! :)

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both are outstanding !

 

lovely knives...

 

Glenn, it sounds like your onna great path..... (both helping people and being helped)... .. by the way, i just can't keep my eyes off that maple handle.... its simply wonderful

 

 

take care bros ;)

Greg

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I also really like the bottom one. I've always been a sucker for the coffin handles though! One question, if you do not mind. Both knives do not appear to have a plunge cut. What is the shape of the tang on these? Is it rectangular in cross section or has it been done like the tangs on Japanese blades? A picture of the bare blade, before the guard and handle was installed, would clear some things up for me. I do not know if you have one, just trying to figure out how you got the guard to fit so seamlessly without making more problems when it came to framing the tang.

 

~Bruce~

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GLENN: Ole pard, you are getting pretty classy--Must be from the company you been keeping.GRIN

 

Congrats for some fine work.

 

chuck

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Thanks guys.I am taking a liking to the style.Ive got to work on that dirk like "evil" look.Jim has a way to make his bowies and dirks yell the word evil. The curly maple was a gift from Randy Skidmore, a great friend he is.The wood was stabilized with nelsonite in the vacuum chamber.I really like how it works and finishes up.

Bruce, sorry for the illusion.That plunge is the guard reflecting off the blade.The tang has the same bevels and cross section as the blade.Make sure you have the finish you want on the blade before fitting the guard.Any work there later will make a nice fit sloppy real quick.The tang is tapered in both directions from the shoulders to the end.The tang at the guard is rounded top and bottom.Mike the thickness of the tang at the thickest and thinnest areas.This will tell you the size bits to drill the top and bottom of your slot.Mike the width of the tang and subtract half the diameters of the drill bit sizes and that's where you drill your holes.A numbered drill set is most helpful.Select one a thousandths or two under. (Make sure your shoulders on the blade are square because the blade is tapered to the tip as well.)Once the holes are drilled a jewelers saw is used to cut out the slot. Use needle files and file the slot to fit.I like a bump on fit and have started soldering the guards on. The better the fit the less cleanup.

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GLENN-- Thanks for the explantion. Glad you are getting to hang out with the better makers. Some of it will rub off.grin.

 

congrats.

chuck

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Glenn Mr. Jim would be proud. Nice job.

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Super nice Glenn! Really nice knives, I can't tell you how bad I feel about missing that hammer-in.

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Great work man! Not the easiest style to make, but you pulled it off like it was easy. I have grown to love these old-style Bowies.

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Thanks again guys, most specially you Don.You are the caliber most check their chambers with.I hope to continue to learn as everyone of you do.I spoke with the good doctor this evening and another thing that makes him special is I found he has traveled 1800 miles this week teaching.At 7PM he was in a room full of folks learning engraving.I found out that's why he had not seen the pic I sent him to hear his critique.

Guy, I hope you can make the next one.Most likely it will be sheathes to carry the blades in.

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The tang has the same bevels and cross section as the blade.

Okay. That's what I thought. Now... How about some insight into how the tang fits into the frame. The tang is thicker at the back side and thinner on the edge side. What fills the gap on the edge side of the tang? Epoxy? Shims? I suppose you could just grind the frame to match. Sort of like a tapered tang, just in a framed handle. Do you solder the frame onto the tang? I would be tempted to do so but, for me, it is usually that extra bit to make the knife "perfect" that has me grumpy, cussing and working for days to fix it! I hope you do not mind the questions. I like seeing how other craftspeople approach a problem. What I think would be the best way to do something usually looks really involved and complicated compared to the solutions of others.

 

~Bruce~

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Hi again Bruce.I guess there are many ways to skin a cat.The handle is pinned onto the frame and nearly finished before the tang is seated into it.I used epoxy and set one pin after it had cured.I guess they may have used hide glue or pitch in the day.You need just a slight amount of play in the tang to frame fit to make sure it aligns square against the guard and straight with the blade.I made a new filing jig with a wide platform and got away from the two pieces of flat bar I used to use.It makes a world of difference in getting things square.Hope this helps.

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Those are really a sweet looking pieces Glenn. Nice flow and beautiful wood.

 

Hope to see you again soon.

 

Robert

Edited by Robert Dark

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Thank you for sharing your techniques. Again, great job on both of those blades!

 

~Bruce~

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