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I'm in mourning right now...


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This evening at 8:30 PM EST, a 2 day old blade died in the quench. It was a fun blade, that loved candlelight dinners and walks on the beach. It had much promise, but alas this promise was cut short and destroyed in an instant by a hairline fracture.

 

*bows head silently*

 

Ok, ok ... I know... that was rather cheesy. Oh well, it was a lame attempt at humor :D:P

 

Here is a picture of the poor thing. On a happy note, it was my first time ever grinding in bevels :D Don't know if you can seem em very good in the picture, but I'm happy with my first.

 

Second_blade___dead__2_of_6_.jpg

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Don't feel too bad. I remember that show on PBS on Japanese sword making. The master swordsmith featured was happy(?) with a failure rate of 25% in the quench.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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eh, I'm not too upset. Thankfully, I hadn't put a lot of work (besides the hammering) into it. The first blade I made I put a good 3-4 days into it before I quenched ... I decided that was too much work, since I had to do a lot of it again (darn scale!)

 

After that one broke, I forged two more before I decided to quit for the night. And I forged some nickel silver while I was waiting for the steel to heat.

 

I'm really starting to understand the heat colors and stuff ... I've been forging WAY too hot. I've easily been forging at 2000 or better. I found that in the sun, in order for the steel to look a nice hot color, it's actually MUCH hotter than in looks. I took it into my dark garage and it was near white in the dark while it was a dark orange in the sun.

 

This is so much fun! I'm loving every minute at the forge. It's like video games, but more rewarding (this coming from a 4 year video game addict)

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Wonder if the quenchant was just too harsh or what.

When you ground the bevel in, what grit was it?

Also after grinding it in did you then sand the bevel to a finer grit parallel to the edge?

 

It was 120 grit - and no, I didn't. I actually just found that advice a few minutes ago. Hehe, live and learn, eh?

 

I'll have to do that on the next one.

 

Hey - question. Where do you guys get wire for wrapping the blade to keep the clay on it? Mine was trying to fall off on me during my normalization cycles.

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Scott, You want to do your normalizing without the clay on. Just put the "clay" on for hardening. What are you using, I've found Satanite to stay on like pretty well all by itself once dry. (Clean blade well with acetone,thinner etc. then apply "clay" and let dry or hold infront of forge opening to dry then commence heat treating). This is what works for me.

 

Shawn

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I've been doing my normalizing before the clay up so the whole blade is at the same crystalline sturcture.

I'll then put the satanite on (it's what I use for my clay) sometimes I forget to wipe the blade down with acetone first to make sure it's clean, so it might pop a piece off in the forge so I run back in and rub so back on in that spot *laughs* Not the best way of doing it. Better to make sure it's clean.

 

Last few W-2 blades I did I went ahead and tried some brake fluid, curious to see how the hamon turn out. Stuff likes to burn though =P

Beau Erwin

www.ErwinKnives.com

Custom knives

Bcarta Composites

Stabilized Woods

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Scott, You want to do your normalizing without the clay on. Just put the "clay" on for hardening. What are you using, I've found Satanite to stay on like pretty well all by itself once dry. (Clean blade well with acetone,thinner etc. then apply "clay" and let dry or hold infront of forge opening to dry then commence heat treating). This is what works for me.

 

Shawn

 

That is what I was thinking I'd do this next time. I use satanite too, and it does seem to stay pretty tight ... but during the final heat, after 3 cycles, it decided to start peeling off. Oh well - lesson learned. Normalize 3 times, air cool, clay it up, heat it up, quench it.

 

I really need to get myself a decent magnet ... I keep having to go by the colors, because I have no magnets, lol.

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On a much happier note - I quench another blade tonight. This one doesn't appear to have any cracks. It's a different shape than the one yesterday, but oh well. I have one similar to yesterdays in the making. Gonna try it again.

 

I did the same things I did last time, but I left the edge a lot thicker. It was pretty thin on the last one. This one was prolly about 3/32-1/8"

 

So, it's in the oven right now at about 350. Gonna go through 2 cycles, then I'll polish it up while I'm at the office tomorrow. Gotta love Wednesdays... always slow :D (darn... i think i might've just jinxed myself)

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Leaving it thicker can help, especially I would bet with water.

It'll be neat to see it polished up.

I've got a pile of blades to polish, and a pile to grind heat treat and polish. Ground one last night, one of the larger ones I've made.

Beau Erwin

www.ErwinKnives.com

Custom knives

Bcarta Composites

Stabilized Woods

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I hope it made a memorable death nell. My blades have sung some of the most beautiful music before giving up the ghost. One blade, (a large bastard sword), broke in 6 places. I call it the singing sword. :lol:

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I hope it made a memorable death nell. My blades have sung some of the most beautiful music before giving up the ghost. One blade, (a large bastard sword), broke in 6 places. I call it the singing sword. :lol:

 

HAHA! Actually, this blade cracked in two places - I found another crack later on.

 

But six ... ouch.

 

I'm working on polishing this one I did last night - I hate doing the first coat - it seems to be the hardest one to do. After the steel is good and flat from the first hand sanding (I start at 220) then the rest go really fast, it seems.

 

/sigh. Another 5 or 6 hours or so of sanding.

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