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anthro hilt


Jake Powning

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Great to see this Jake!

 

It was a fine day at the museum and now this came out of it, making the visit even more worth while.

I´m still working on healing my left arm elbow, so I´ll have to seek comfort in looking at the inspiring work of other´s.

Can´t wait to get started myself. I´ve had these anthro hilted swords on my to-do list for a number of years, but I think my take will be slightly different (as it should and has to!). They are fascinating weapons. I love those celestial inlays and look forward to seeing what you will be making out of them (I´ll send you a copy of the article if you need it).

I did not know about the idea that they were connected to the artisan class. Always thought the connection was more directly and strongly to the druids, if anything. What do you think about them being sacrificial blades? You know the image of Mithras stabbing the bull. (Not that he is a Celtic divinity, but still it shows a sacrificial scene using a short sword of about this size).

I would be very happy to learn there is a connection to artisans, as I would not mind having this as the sword of the smith!

It is interesting that the shape of the hilt and the blade together looks very much like the graphic image of the thunderbolt of the Sky God (as depicted in greek myth).

 

Great work Jake!

It is an inspiration to see such fine blades being made.

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thanks guys. I did do an anthro inspired by the same original years ago, but after seeing the real thing I was compelled to try again. I've attached a picture of the original and my first attempt at an anthro hilt from 1999 or so.

Hi Peter, I guess I was extrapolating on some reading I've done on The Druids and their ranks possibly including the artisan class. I am very familiar with the Mithras killing the bull statues, there used to be a very beautifull example infront of the door to the british dark ages room at the british museum before it was all changed around. I was looking at this piece with that in mind and it would suit very well... I think there's a white bull at my neighbors down the road... :o;)

I hope your arm gets better soon my friend.

here's mithras slaying the primordial bull from the 3rd century C.E. I think. This was a popular religion among legionaries in britain as well as elsware in the roman empire...

anthroO.jpg

lucrom8.jpg

522px_BritishMuseumMithras.jpg

Edited by Jake Powning
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thanks guys. I did do an anthro inspired by the same original years ago, but after seeing the real thing I was compelled to try again. I've attached a picture of the original and my first attempt at an anthro hilt from 1999 or so.

Hi Peter, I guess I was extrapolating on some reading I've done on The Druids and their ranks possibly including the artisan class. I am very familiar with the Mithras killing the bull statues, there used to be a very beautifull example infront of the door to the british dark ages room at the british museum before it was all changed around. I was looking at this piece with that in mind and it would suit very well... I think there's a white bull at my neighbors down the road... :o;)

I hope your arm gets better soon my friend.

here's mithras slaying the primordial bull from the 3rd century C.E. I think. This was a popular religion among legionaries in britain as well as elsware in the roman empire...

 

well, in recent months I have conducted studies on mitraism because I am working on a university examination (architectural restoration) within a Mitreum, so I have plenty of information concerned.

Mithras is a deity of Indo-iranian (persian) origins, as Jake says, was very popular in the Roman legions, for two reasons: it was a religion which brought together the soldiers because of various origins, and was based on 7 degrees of initiation requiring courage tests, so much loved by the soldiers!

This religion was a very mysterious and hidden, took place in old buildings dark and dark caves, very often underground and women were prohibited.

In Rome was a very great religion between the III and IV century B.C.

The killing of the bull (tauroctomia) is the esoteric element that summarizes the whole religion and is rich in symbolism, each individual has a particular or more specific meanings and the cave assumes the function of the cosmos, all relied heavily on the cosmos (sun , stars, moon, seasons), sun and constellations; it is not a case that the adept and the priest are dogged student of astrology. The main symbols were: scorpion, dog, snake, bull, ear, dedofori, raven (in my inspiration to northern religions) and much others.

I have collected several notes on this religion, if you are interested I can provide it, but I am Italian! And my english is very poor :unsure:

All these symbols and the dagger that Mitra used to kill the bull convinced me to do a project of a short sword that i am making in the future.

However, this photo from the dagger (dagger of Aries) is very similar to a Cinqueda.

The inscription on the top of the Tauroctomia is: "to the invincible sun god Mithras, Tiberio Claudio Hermes gives after a vow"

I attach 2 photos that I shot during my studies in mitreum which is located several meters below ground near the Circus Maximum in Rome ... of course, I hope these

information are understandable and welcome.

 

 

MiT_1.JPG

 

MIT_2.jpg

CIAO FROM ITALY

 

Marco Di Francesco

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Great Photos. Thanks for the info Marco it is most welcome. Is this the panel that has a carving of mithras dining with the solar deity on the backside of it? and is it still set up in the original mithraea/underground temple? that must be really cool to visit and imagine the roman soldiers there so long ago...

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Great Photos. Thanks for the info Marco it is most welcome. Is this the panel that has a carving of mithras dining with the solar deity on the backside of it? and is it still set up in the original mithraea/underground temple? that must be really cool to visit and imagine the roman soldiers there so long ago...

 

yes, the solar deity is in the backside (upper left), but also the moon deity (upper right); the main feature of this panel (tauroctomia) is the duality of symbolism: the sun and moon (day and night) Cautes and Cautopates (2 "dedofori", i do not know them name in english) with torches raised (left) and lowered (right) or the columns at the sides, raised at left and lowered at right.

All this happens in the cosmos (4 stars near the head of Mithra).

A continued reference to the sun and the seasons, the birth of Mithra is happening from the rock, as the sun rises from a mountain.

Reassuming, the symbolism in this mysterious religion is a lot, unfortunately my English is poor and i am not able to describe all because are complicated, sorry :unsure:

However I found very interesting the part of the 7 degrees of initiation, if you involved I advice a good book on this topic because each grade had a specific task during the religious function.

The lunch is not represented on the panel but was in the room where everyone was seated on the sides, on benches carved in the rock or marble (see photo).

 

Oh yes Jake, this panel is the original of the Mitreum which was discovered by chance years ago under a building, as you say is really exciting, I had the fortune to work alone (together with a friend) into Mitreum.

This photo (not my) shows the room where the lunch and the religious function took place.

 

I hope again that my english is understandable!

 

MIT_3.JPG

CIAO FROM ITALY

 

Marco Di Francesco

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Love that hilt. It's got a kind of whimsical feel to it. Really nice.

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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This is areally cool thread. I love the combinations of mythology and practical function that weave their ways through it. I don't know enough about the mythology to speak to any of what I am reading, so this is a treat. Thanks. Also, that is an awesome sword, Jake. Is the hilt cast all in one piece? Is that how the originals were made?

Show me a blacksmith making a toilet, and I will show you a man forging ahead.

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Hi Brice, yes the hilt is cast in one piece. I don't know how the originals where cast, some of them weren't, there are some examples with iron hilts, but I believe the bronze hilts would have been cast in one piece, no real evidence to back that theory up other than practicality.

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Jake,

it is great to see the bar get elevated by your work.......one wouldn't think you could not get any better but you do............ are you bringing that to Ashokan? I would love to see it live........or is it a problem crossing the border......

dick

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are you bringing that to Ashokan? I would love to see it live........or is it a problem crossing the border......

dick

 

Hi Dick, I was planning on bringing it, but it sold and I shipped it out this morning, so I guess I can't complain about that ;)

I will be bringing Du Sith along though, a light bastard sword I made earlier in the summer.

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