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DFogg

Most Difficult, Most Rewarding

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Last night I leaped a hurdle (one of many) that I'm having with a knife that I have been working on.  I'm VERY happy camper.  I do understand that its probably not much of achievement for most, but thats not important to me because its been a huge learning experience for me.  I'm pretty happy!   You know....     I'm going to miss it when its finished.  It's like reading a good book and then ......     its over!

 

  The interesting thing is it was only supposed to be a "study"  I was copying an old knife design.  My son and wife were dumbfounded that I would do that.  But its becoming the Most difficult and Most rewarding project so far!  Its even kinda sad that most won't even see the cruxes that I hurdled and will be puzzled at my excitement.

 

Are you sure this craft is only knifemaking?

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Hi Rik,

 

Making something from raw materials is a purely creative process. It is non-verbal, it engages the mind and challenges it at almost every instant. It requires skill and it is satisfying when those skills are developed. It is rewarding because by comparison there is very little in our modern lives that offer such tangible returns.

 

We are waiting for the pictures.

 

Don

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yeah, what Don said :)

 

I have spent a great deal of my life deliberately choosing the more difficult path. Several people have asked me why ? I have no good answer, just that I must, it is what I do. Sometimes, if the path is not difficult enough on it's own, I will create further difficulties. I think it is human nature, but perhaps only my own nature, sometimes I can hardly tell.

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I think we all have this in common.  Why spend hours making something that you can go into any hardware store and buy for 10% of the money?  Why would anyone one want one of those?  If you can ask the question, you probably won't understand the answer.

 

I find that there is a very primal satisfaction to this kind of work, particularly when, after failure after failure, you finally get something close to that image in your head.  These days I spend part of my time doing stuff I'm not ready to do yet, just as a test to see if I can.  I'm not afraid to to toss a failed piece if I can learn something in the process.

 

In T'ai Chi there is a saying "Invest in failure".  The point being that you don't learn by success, but by failing and seeing where and why.  The lesson I take away is "Don't be afraid to try".

 

Geoff

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The oriental phrase:  "the best things in life are the simplest, and most difficult" comes to mind here.

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Rick,

 

Now you have to show us this thing.  I take a ridiculous amount of pride in a 9"+ blade I'm working on and flat grinding with handfiles.  The blade *is* flat!  Fancy that!  Yeepee!

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I ordered up some handle material,  I was going to use what I had (still may) but I want to make sure since I've come this far.  I hope I didn't miss lead anyone. Its not that big of deal (Don and Howard will smile)  the biggest crux was reforging without messing up the 2500 grit polished clay blade.

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Guest Tai

If it was easy... everyone would be doing it.

 

Making repros or quazi repros is a great way to learn. They may look simple at first glace, but try to make one. That's where the learning is bro.

 

It was good to see you Rik. You really are oozing with tallent and abillity. I mean that bro, but don't let it go to your head. You are doing great! Keep up the good work and it will pay off.

 

Not many have it, but Rik does. All I ask is please remember and speak kindly of your humble neo-tribal blademaster. :)

 

You da man Rik!

 

17717035-8ba6-019A01F4-.jpg

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