Jump to content

Salt pot questions


Recommended Posts

I scored a 50 pound bag of low temperature nitrate salts, so its time I build a salt pot. I've read everything I can find on salt pots but I still have questions. Stainless steel pipe is hard to find, can I use black iron pipe instead? How corrosive are nitrate salts? Would 3/8”wall x 4” ID aluminum pipe work for low temperature nitrate salts? Aluminum melts at 1218f, so if I temper 350 f to 585 f, with an adjustable low flame gas heater, theoretically a 3/8”wall aluminum pipe should work, or am I missing something?

Any help on this subject would be appreciated.

 

Dennis K

Link to post
Share on other sites

My low temp salt pot is black iron (cold water casing). I used a black iron pan for bluing gun barrels for many years. I haven't noticed any corrosion to enough degree to worry about containment. The low temp salts are hygroscopic, they'll draw water from the air. Even in combination with the water there isn't any notable corrosion. The black iron will be fine.

Link to post
Share on other sites
How about for high temp salts . . . if I keep a close eye on things :)

 

That might work for a little while. I have no experience with the high temp salts in anything other than stainless pipe. Some of the new salts are less, um, active than the older recipes. I'd still opt for 316L tubing if you can find it. It'll be more durable all the way around. I hope Howard will jump in here too, because I know he's tried more things. I learned from some of the failures. I think the real reason to avoid black iron is the potential for scaling that will degrade that pipe quicker than stainless.

 

The problem with the high temperature salts is that they are only easy to move around on two specific occasions. The first is when you buy them. They are soft, nicely granular, they flow easily when poured. The second case is when they are at temperature and return to a "pourable" state. Then you can dump the salt and save it for later and use a new tube. In between you will cuss and fume because they act a lot more like hardened concrete, or worse. I'd much rather build the tube to last the longest possible without having to fix things, or worry about when "things are going to go..."

Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the real reason to avoid black iron is the potential for scaling that will degrade that pipe quicker than stainless.
I'd much rather build the tube to last the longest possible without having to fix things, or worry about when "things are going to go..."

The same people that make ITC 100 also make a product intended to protect metal at high temperatures. I think it was developed to go on kiln heater elements originaly. A coating of this on the outside of your high temp. salt tube could make things last much longer.

 

~Bruce~

Link to post
Share on other sites
The same people that make ITC 100 also make a product intended to protect metal at high temperatures. I think it was developed to go on kiln heater elements originaly. A coating of this on the outside of your high temp. salt tube could make things last much longer.

 

~Bruce~

 

 

Do you have a name or link?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you have a name or link?

 

 

ITC-213, followed by ITC-296A. Short descriptions here.

 

Who knows, they may work. I don't think I'd want to be the guinea pig with high-temp salts, though. :ph34r:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm thinking that it would make a good coating for the outside of the salt tube to prevent scaling/corrosion from the gas atmosphere. The salts aren't going to do much to the inside of the tube compared to the more aggressive outside environment. Only one way to find out. LOL.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...