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Below is an ad that was run in The Clinker Breaker, the monthly magazine of the Florida Artist Blacksmith Association. I have no idea if the pricing is good or not, but it looked like it might be of interest here, so I figured I'd pass it on.

 

Wrought Iron

 

We are in the process of dismantling the 1887 Globe Elevator near the Duluth-Superior Harbor and reclaiming its old-growth pine. Among its other treasures are several hundred thousand pounds of real wrought iron rods, ranging from 5/8 to 1.5 inches in diameter, up to 14 inches long. We also have flat bars a millions of wrought (square) nails. Prices start at $2 per pound. Call to check inventory.

 

Wisconson Woodchuck LLC

2 Banks Ave, P.O. Box 97, Superior, WI, 54880-0097

Phone: (715) 392-5110

Fax: (715) 392-5112

d.hozza@wisconsinwoodchuck.net

www.wisconsinwoodchuck.net

Edited by M. McKenzie

MacGyver is my patron saint.

 

"There's nothing in the universe cold steel won't cut." -Conan of Cimmeria-

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Below is an ad that was run in The Clinker Breaker, the monthly magazine of the Florida Artist Blacksmith Association. I have no idea if the pricing is good or not, but it looked like it might be of interest here, so I figured I'd pass it on.

 

Wrought Iron

 

We are in the process of dismantling the 1887 Globe Elevator near the Duluth-Superior Harbor and reclaiming its old-growth pine. Among its other treasures are several hundred thousand pounds of real wrought iron rods, ranging from 5/8 to 1.5 inches in diameter, up to 14 inches long. We also have flat bars a millions of wrought (square) nails. Prices start at $2 per pound. Call to check inventory.

 

Wisconson Woodchuck LLC

2 Banks Ave, P.O. Box 97, Superior, WI, 54880-0097

Phone: (715) 392-5110

Fax: (715) 392-5112

d.hozza@wisconsonwoodchuck.net

www.wisconsonwoodchuck.net

If you type wisconsin rather that wisconson the web-page will load and I think the e-mail will work as well

This is the response they sent me

we also have a "special" on now - five-pound bundles of foot-long 5/8" rods for $42 delivered (which includes the shipping and handling) and 10-pound bundles for $59 delivered.

if you want short lengths (up to 13"), we can send up to 70 lbs anywhere in the u.s. for a shipping-and-handling fee of $19.50. longer lengths (up to 6 feet) can be sent by ups or fedex ground relatively inexpensively, but we have to price each order individually.

probably the best deal right now for a small order is to take one of the "specials" and add in a couple of 12" rods (or bars) of different sizes, which would not add anything to the shipping and handling.

for instance, you could get 5 lbs of 5/8" rod (5 one-foot pieces) plus 8 lbs of 1-1/4" rod (2 one-foot pieces) for $62 delivered. or 5 lbs. of 5/8" rods plus 4 lbs of flat bar for $58. or 10 lbs. of 5/8" rod plus 5 lbs of 1" rod for $78. you get the idea. you can mix and match 1-foot lengths of whatever you want as long as you start with one of the specials and you don't exceed 70 lbs overall.

hope that's helpful. feel free to call or email if you have questions.

 

judy peres218-464-3705

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Is this actually silicated old iron? The term "wrought" is used alot to describe just about any iron that is old or made to look old.

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

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Is this actually silicated old iron? The term "wrought" is used alot to describe just about any iron that is old or made to look old.

 

I had wondered about that as well, and there's no pics of the iron structurals on the website. I can almost guarantee the nails are NOT wrought iron, since around these parts anyway you stop seeing wrought iron used for cut nails by 1870 at the latest. The 1887 construction date for the elevator does sound promising for the structurals to still be wrought iron, though. It's a decent price, if it's really wrought iron.

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That is how I ended up with 150 Lbs. of buggy axle that was a mid carbon shear steel. The guy I bought the wagon rims from said he had some axles that were also wrought. I even quized him about the apearance and some simple tests to do. So half of the shipment was real nice 1x 1/14" silicated iron and the other half steel. It was bittersweet since not only does the axle steel heat treat but has some very cool pattening in it when etched.

 

He even commented that a couple of his friends that blacksmith like that "strandy crap" in his words. So I had a high enough confidence level to place a large order. Some of the rims were not even silicated iron, just plain old steel with no carbon and no pattern and alot of rust.

 

My luck rarely if ever drifts that way. I have been hosed more times then I have scored with getting wrought iron.

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

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If you type wisconsin rather that wisconson the web-page will load and I think the e-mail will work as well

This is the response they sent me

 

Ah crap, how'd I manage to do that?

 

Sorry about any confusion my sorry typo might have caused. I've fixed the link in the first post.

MacGyver is my patron saint.

 

"There's nothing in the universe cold steel won't cut." -Conan of Cimmeria-

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Here is the latest correspondence. Anyone wanna be the W.I. Expert??

 

i am unable to get into that blog to post my own response directly, but feel free to post this:

 

we are not metal experts (we are in the wood reclamation business), so we had a couple of respected blacksmiths work some of the wrought iron and give us their opinion. I'm reasonably sure the rods and flat bars are the real thing. I'm less certain about the nails, although one of the blacksmiths did say they were wrought, too.

we have done the test where you cut about 2/3 through the bar and then bend it. you can see the fibers quite clearly. also, there is relatively little rust for 120-year-old iron.

anyway, we'd be happy to send a few samples to someone who would be willing to try it out and tell the rest of us what he thinks.

best,

Judy

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Sounds promising and it's cool they are willing to let someone play with it first.

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

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definitely looks wrought to me, but then i don't know too much about iron.

jared Z.

 

lilzee on britishblades.

 

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

-Sir Winston Churchill

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