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World's cheapest, ugliest, most versatile solid fuel forge.

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Not bad!

 

I had the furnace on the house replaced a few years ago, but I had the fore thought to salvage the blower ( with electric motor ) from it, but I have had the duce of a time trying to figure out if it was big & powerful enough to run a forge / foundry furnace and how to mount it in order to do so.

 

Any pointers?

 

 

BTW, who's the guy working around the hot forge with a t-shirt ;) ?

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" World's cheapest, ugliest, most versatile solid fuel forge.,"

I concur most undoubtedly. :rolleyes: But if it works that's all that matters. Wade

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That furnace fan is about 5, to the tenth power, more CFM than you need for a forge. I rigged it up so it mainly ventilates my shop. A very small opening is for the draught.

 

Ok, I'm glad to hear that I'm good to go with the forge - do you have any thoughts about it's use about as a small foundry furnace ( just to clarify things I am entertaining thoughts at making home made iron/steel and making cast iron objects )?

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I based my old solid forge design on this. I used it for a good year or more, and it was great. Only difference was that I used dirt, instead of ash at first, just mixing in the ash as I went. Dirt doesn't insulate as well as ash, but it means you can use the design and not have to wait for a supply of ash to come around. Gonna re-build it so I can use solid fuel again when I run out of oil.

 

Is the side draft tuyere fixed in place, or can you adjust the height, and therefore depth, of the firepot? Also, how does it do for small fires for small work? I've only seen pictures of it with a big firepot dug out.

 

be merry!

Archie

Edited by Archie Zietman

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In small batches, it works most excellent. You really need insawool for a lid though, when melting. Double is best. I recycle used fireclay, fire brick, etc., for the walls of the fire box when melting. Mix it with ash if you wish. You can see the blender in the background. That's what that is for. Ive melted silicon carbide crucibles in that. You need a fair amount of charcoal though. Also chop to size. according to the process.

 

I am planning on a specific furnace and firing it with waste oil, for normal melts - a lot of heat and the fuel can be free, depending on your source.

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That's sort of what I had in mind - a homemade refractatory along the outer walls and high temp commerical product along the inner walls were it get's real hot.

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Awesome Jerry lol!

 

Guess I was on the right track when I made this one then:

 

DSCF6952.jpg

 

And a picture in use:

 

DSCF6956.jpg

DSCF6961.jpg

 

Only real difference is I put my quench tank right there with it lol =). Just cut the barrel across the top, bottom, and down one side, then folded it outwards. Voila, heat treat forge and quench tank!

 

Cris

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That's actually a pretty innovative use of a drum, I think, Cris. You certainly don't have far to take your metal when it's time to quench.

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That's actually a pretty innovative use of a drum, I think, Cris. You certainly don't have far to take your metal when it's time to quench.

 

LOL yeah, I have trouble enough getting it all to one temperature...didn't want to then mess with dragging it across my work area to quench it =).

 

Mines not as good as Jerry's though...my tuyer and firepot is only moderately versatile. I can plug off air holes for a smaller area for heat treating knives and such (versus longer blades), but I don't think it would do much good as a furnace for casting and such lol. It's basically a Tim Lively style washtub forge on steroids =).

 

Cris

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Yes, I agree.

One thing I suggest for heat treating with charcoal, is use a vessel with a blanket of insa wool. This evens out the temp real nice. You can put a few wood chips in for a neutral atmosphere, which helps reduce decarb and scale. Be sure to use a thermal couple to be accurate and not over heat the blade.

 

Yeah I definately need to get some inswool one way or another. Is yours treated with any kind of coating?

 

Also, what kind of thermocouple would you use for something like this? I've read about them a ton on this site...but everytime I go to look for them online lol, the choices of type are mind boggling.

 

Cool stuff Jerry, again =).

 

Cris

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I see a lot of questions pop up about beginner's forges now and again.

 

it only loses a few degrees an hour after reaching 1400. It was 1100 degrees after 2 days!

 

 

Jerry,

 

That is the problem with these forges, the charcoal just keep on burning and burning. The flip side to that is you only need one match and from then on just turn on the air when you feel like doing a little forging. If you shut down a gas forge for a while, drop a small chunk of wood into it and when you come back just start it up again, the smoldering carbon will act as a pilot light.

 

 

If you want to slow cool some steel a smoldering bed of charcoal works very well.

 

Be safe with charcoal, shops are expensive.

 

 

Jan

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correct me if I am wrong but I thought I remember reading that wet wood ash is basic and can leave a nasty burn.

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Thanks for the tip about the caustic nature of wood ash. I did not know that. You learn something new everyday right?

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