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Cast iron


Boacrow
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I have a cast iron pot that I was thinking about making a forge out of. When I say pot, that's only partially accurate. It's actually the stool from an old privy that was in my backyard. Thanks to some armadillos, I was forced to tear the slab out that it was sitting on. I also got two leaf springs out of the slab. I'm guessing rebar wasn't readily available to the people that built it lol. So I was wondering if this pot would make a good forge and if not, what can I do with it. Sitting as it was intended it's about the height of an average toilet bowl, oval in shape with straight sides. Picture a toilet seat that is about a foot and a half tall and made of cast iron. It weighs a ton so it's still sitting in the woods behind the house. I'd like some ideas on what I can do with it. Like I said, my first thought was flip it on it's side and turn it into a forge but I've also thought about filling it with concrete and making it an anvil stand. It's too cool to just leave out in the woods to rust away. Please help!

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I got it out of the woods and got some pics. Hope this helps. I can't imagine throwing this thing out. The walls are over half an inch thick so it's got to be good for something anyway.

Edited by Boacrow
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You could fill the bottom with sand, wood ash or refractory cement and shove a pipe in through that hole in the back for air. It could be an interesting forge or foundry. If nothing else, it's got an interesting story attached to it.

MacGyver is my patron saint.

 

"There's nothing in the universe cold steel won't cut." -Conan of Cimmeria-

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That's what I was thinking. I'm not really sure what possibilities exist since I don't have a lot of experience with this sort of thing. I've been using a brake rotor for a forge burning coal that I've found in my yard and I also made a small two brick forge that I use two small propane torches to heat but I would really like to make a decent size gas forge that I can get up to welding heat. Gas just really makes me nervous being so unforgiving of mistakes and all.

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I see a crapper forge in your future. :blink:

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

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LOL gotta love it. As big as it is, I'm thinking it would take a lot of refractory material to make the space inside small enough to heat economically. Being new to all this, I'm not sure exactly what I would have to do to get this thing up to heat. Any ideas on how to make this thing work?

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LOL gotta love it. As big as it is, I'm thinking it would take a lot of refractory material to make the space inside small enough to heat economically.

 

It would take a bunch of refractory cement, yes, but you can probably fill that cement with rocks to cut down on material usage. Or you could fill it 1/4 of the way full with sand, then some firebricks, then pour on the cement.

 

You're gonna get to tell everyone you have a crappy forge, and for once, it'll kinda-sorta be true. :D

MacGyver is my patron saint.

 

"There's nothing in the universe cold steel won't cut." -Conan of Cimmeria-

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What I really want to know is if it's going to be fueled by natural gas or un-natural gas - either way it's an awful lot of beans :blink:

Once you can accept the universe as matter expanding into nothing that is something, wearing stripes with plaid comes easy.

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It could make a good solid fuel forge. It strikes me as a square peg for a gas forge, though. It's too big (if you're mainly interested in bladesmithing) and unnecessarily heavy -- and yes, you'd need an excessive amount of insulation to make it work.

 

For solid fuel, I'd fill the bottom mostly with sand, then a layer of wood ash on top of that. The purpose of the sand is just to bring up the bottom of the forge. It's a poor insulator, but that won't really matter because wood ash is an excellent one.

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Personally I'd used the clay, sand, horsedung mix, which has been tested and tried for thousands of years:) Very heat tolerant, highly insulating, quick and doesn't cost anything. The only thing is that it shrinks somewhat, so you'd have to fill the gaps. And naturally it stinks a bit too;)

Jeroen Zuiderwijk

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/barbarianmetalworking

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