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Seriously, I'm only on my second drink, but I'm seeing two quench lines in this piece of 1084 that I dunked in veg oil. Can someone explain to me what I'm seeing?

 

The lines almost touch about a 3rd of the length from the tip, but spread back out to over 1/2" from each other at each end.

 

I'd try to take a picture of it, but my picture takin' skills stink. I can't even get a good pic of a finished knife, much less this fine of a detail.

 

Thanks,

JV

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Mike Manabe used to have double lines as a feature of his blades. I used to get it once in a while, and at one time was pretty sure I could do it at will. Forget now how I decided that but I think it involved two quenches, one after the other. Yours could potentially happen if bobbing the blade in the quench or things just happen willy nilly once in a while.

 

Dan

Dan Pfanenstiel

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Seriously, I'm only on my second drink, but I'm seeing two quench lines in this piece of 1084 that I dunked in veg oil. Can someone explain to me what I'm seeing?

 

The lines almost touch about a 3rd of the length from the tip, but spread back out to over 1/2" from each other at each end.

 

I'd try to take a picture of it, but my picture takin' skills stink. I can't even get a good pic of a finished knife, much less this fine of a detail.

 

Thanks,

JV

 

 

 

I think that could be what the Japanese call "Utsuri".

 

A photo would help though.

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Mike Manabe used to have double lines as a feature of his blades. I used to get it once in a while, and at one time was pretty sure I could do it at will. Forget now how I decided that but I think it involved two quenches, one after the other. Yours could potentially happen if bobbing the blade in the quench or things just happen willy nilly once in a while.

 

Dan

I've had it happen in 1095, 1084, and 1060 from using a slightly modified edge-quench. As soon as the blade hits the quenchant submerge 1/3 the width of the blade for 4-6 seconds, then submerge half the blade until the color is gone. A noticeable line forms at each phase of the quench... at least, that's how I think I did it... it's possible the thicker parts of the blade had not entirely austinized, which may have caused the second line. Sometimes, it just seems to happen without planning or any special treatment, 1095 and 1084 seem to be prone to it, from my limited experience.

 

See if you can repeat it...

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
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Is there any photo?

 

Was it one single quench in oil or something interrupted?

Without clay?

Maybe the oil surface created the two lines while quenching...?

 

 

[i tried a water/oil quench and created 2 (actual 3) lines - interesting but a bit stange:

Effekte.jpg

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=9150]

Andi B.

 

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I dunno what it is, but it looks cool... B)

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

RelicForge on facebook
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