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YellowHammer

my anvil

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Hi everyone, i had just bought my first anvil the other day.

It weigh's 100 pounds and its practicly brand new.My problem is i think its to soft really soft i'm not sure but i think its an iron anvil can i do anything about it? maybe weld a steel plate on the face.

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Hey Phil, As long as you work hot steel on it it should be ok,

however every errant hammer blow will put a dink in the face.

What brand anvil is it? The are a lot of anvil shaped objects for sale out there that are not anvils in the classic sense. You  can get a very good anvil very reasonably from www.euroanvils.net  or  www.oldworldanvils.com

Harbor Frieght sells 110# Russian anvil for about 80 bucks. which is serviceable but needs a lot of tuning.

But as to your present anvil I am not sure if surface hardening compounds will work on something that large. Someone might chime in on that avenue.

Good Luck

 

YellowHammer

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The anvil is a power fist anvil not sure if you ever herd of it.

But if i would work 1095 on it would the steel be softer then the iron when heated??

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Hot steel, with some exceptions, say some of the high alloy tool steels, should be softer than the anvil face.  Dings in the surface will teach you better hammer control.  The real issue is how much the anvil is helping or hurting you.  A good anvil should return energy to the hammer with every strike.  That way you don't have to lift the hammer into position after every stroke.  A way to tell is to bounce a ball bearing on the face.  It should return nearly to your hand after you drop it.

 

As to hardening an anvil, that's a pretty tall order.  You need to have a way to heat 100lbs of steel to 1500 degrees or so, and then have a way to quench the face fast enough to harden it.  The factories used thousands of gallons in a cascade to do it.  And that assumes that the anvil is made of a hardenable material.

 

As to welding a hard face on the anvil, again, it is passable, but it's a big job.  The way I've heard of is to drill holes around the perimeter and weld in posts, then drill holes in the hard plate and fit it over the posts and weld the plate down, not forgetting to pre-heat the anvil to 400-500 degrees.  It might be cheaper to just find a good anvil in the first place.

 

Geoff

 

In the Sunny Great North Wet (no rain for a looooong time)

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Thanks for the advice Geoff,i think i'll go make some charcul or now. :)

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I'd take a file to the top, if it's cast iron it will be really easy to file and if so, it's not worth much for hot work but may be good for tooling leather, setting rivets, or similar work. I have a 93 pound Peter Wright anvil, a similar size, and the top is hard as glass. Another good test is to hit it squarely (that is, not with the edge but with the flat of the hammer) and moderately hard. A good anvil will practically throw the hammer back, even into your forehead if you aren't careful. Larger anvils are usually a bit softer than smaller ones because of the physics of heat treating, but around 100 pounds counts as small in this context, and anvils in this size range will usually be very hard if they were made well.

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Thanks for the advise mstu, i hav'nt really started forging lately but ive started getting the tools i need to finally start. :) And as for the anvil i'll go searching at antique stores and flea markets thats actually where i picked it up, so im bound to find a steel anvil soon. :;):

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