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Tate Roth

Question about DIY rolling mill.

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I think my springtime project may be a rolling mill to compliment my press. I like the idea of rolling out to specific dimensions quickly. I saw on the anvilfire site that a unit was in production that used a worm drive reducer instead of wheels and belts on the standard mcdonald mill. I like that idea for safety and simplicity. I have a 1 & 1/2 horse c face motor 1750 RPM. I have the chance to pick up a drive with c face attachment rated up to 1 & 3/4 horse. The only downside is it's a 60:1 reducer which gives you ~29 RPM. From that I can see, 22 is what it's set up for. This takes the originals 14 feet/min to 18.5 feet/min. Do you think that would be enough torque with that size motor, or should I keep looking for a deal on a 80:1 which would be ideal? I could always gear it down externally.

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I would like to see some pics of these rooling milles, did they ever make a small rolling mill ?

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Thanks for the contact info. After thinking about it some more, I think I may go with the standard wheels and belts. After doing more research on them, it seems these things have a tendency to stall. I'm not sure how well a speed reducer would handle that. A simple belt would just slip. Sometimes simpler is better. I was originally thinking of a building a type of tire hammer, but think I'd get more use out of the mill and keep my neighbors happier.

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Mine is a 1hp motor with a 100:1 gear drive. I have different size chain sprockets on the one chain to step it up to 21rpm and about 12.5 fpm with my rollers. I can bog it down with big stock if I try to take too big of a bite but at that point I'm probably putting too much force on the rollers and bearings anyway. We're already losing some power with a gear drive over chains from what I've been told so I wouldn't want 18+ fpm with that size motor, but if you can get the right size sprockets to get it down to 14 fpm or less it should be OK.

 

The sprockets look the same in the photo because of perspective but really the one on the gear drive is a little bigger than the one on the roller.

 

IMG_0236.jpg

Edited by HSJackson

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Tate their is a discussion and pictures on steel rolling mills, on the 10th of January 2008 page 10 of tools and tool making, hope this helps. Dennis K

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Tate their is a discussion and pictures on steel rolling mills, on the 10th of January 2008 page 10 of tools and tool making, hope this helps. Dennis K

 

Thanks Dennis, I must have missed that one. I've decided to go with the wheels and sprockets instead of the reducer, I'll just have to build a lot of guards for it.

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When I first built a rolling mill, I used a gear reducer that wasn't rated with high enough torque. I noticed a big difference once I switched it pulleys and gears. When I priced a gear reducer with the appropriate specs, it was more expensive than I wanted to pay. If you can scrounge one, it's a simpler way to construct it.

 

Here's a picture of mine.

rolling_mill_1.jpg

 

Jamie

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i scored a nice 1.5 hp 60:1 reducer from surplus center and plan on using that due to when i figured out the belts and pulleys it was going to cost me more than i payed for the reducer and i plan on using a belt to drive the reducer so i have some thing that can slip if needed (tho i didnt price it out using surplus center for the belts and pulleys)

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I built mine from Mcdonald's plans without modifications and it works fine. I've never been able to bog it down (1/2hp), though I'm not one for taking things to thier limits either. While it would seem intimidating to have those gears and chains turning where they are, it is thier placement that keeps things safe. As long as dogs, cats and children aren't playing around it while it's running, you'd be fine. The real danget in these things would be if the roller were feeding in from the front and sucked you in. Since the design rotates toward you, it's not a problem. I don't feel concerned at all about using mine unguarded.

 

Dan

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I love my mill, I built it a few years ago, glad I did it, also glad I used the belt for first drive, it works as a natural clutch. There is a report in the CD to build this, about problems in units using gear reduction without a way for slippage.

 

I used a 1.5 Hp ,motor.

mill2.jpg

Edited by Steve Sells

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I used a 60:1 gear on mine, but to crank it down even more I used a chain between the reducer and the roller with the chain wheel on the roller twice the size of the one on the gear. 3 hp motor which gives plenty of torque.

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So this may be a stupid question, but I've never seen a mill of this design in use. Is the pressure applied to the billet all from the foot treadle? It seems like that would give you a giant leg in no time flat....

 

-d

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My mill treadle is on a 60 to one lever giving roughly 6 tonns for my 100kg .I don't stamp on mine I stand on it .I was dubious but now I use it all the time , I don't weld on it, I have a good hammer and press for that . For finishing blades to size its amazing, especially swords.

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So this may be a stupid question, but I've never seen a mill of this design in use. Is the pressure applied to the billet all from the foot treadle? It seems like that would give you a giant leg in no time flat....

 

-d

 

 

 

This thing was designed right. It don't take much leg pressure to close the rollers. I didn't build mine, so I'm not sure how it's done, but it's pretty easy on you to operate. When starting with a big billet it is kind of slow at reducing the billet. The thinner the billet gets the faster it draws out. I'll have my press done soon, so I can do most of my drawing out with that, and then use the mill to get uniform thickness on the final billets. I have a one horse power motor on mine. Does anyone know if a bigger motor would let you take a bigger bite out of a billet an each pass?

 

Tony G

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I have purchased a 20 hp motor with fly wheel for my next rolling mill build ,wont be a foot pedal one though ,more of a fix the gap and feed it in kind of mill .

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I have purchased a 20 hp motor with fly wheel for my next rolling mill build ,wont be a foot pedal one though ,more of a fix the gap and feed it in kind of mill .

 

 

Hi Owen,

 

Although i've asked at work and they don't meet your rate requirements, having read this i still think it might be worth you popping in when you've got some free time.

 

You might enjoy a look through our Cellar!!!

 

;)

 

When ever we strip out jobs with automation, we keep all the motors, but when we do a new automation job we can't use them for warranty reasons and have to buy in new ones.

 

We've got a cellar full of big, low ratio geared motors <_<

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here is my macdonalds mill... not quite finished (is now)

 

3059130525_9a4f41d65e.jpg

 

and the motor for my next mill (20 hp 3 phaze weighs more than the last rolling machine!!) .This will be a serious Machine and I am having an engineer go over the spec to make sure I don't make a machine that kills me?? I'll be putting shear pins in the power train some where and 5" by 12" rollers ,acme jacks (or maybe hydraulic with adjustable over load valve).

 

3254555777_02aafbf719.jpg

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Hi Owen,

 

Although i've asked at work and they don't meet your rate requirements, having read this i still think it might be worth you popping in when you've got some free time.

 

You might enjoy a look through our Cellar!!!

 

;)

 

When ever we strip out jobs with automation, we keep all the motors, but when we do a new automation job we can't use them for warranty reasons and have to buy in new ones.

 

We've got a cellar full of big, low ratio geared motors <_<

 

Simon ,you have convinced me ,I will have to pop over ,could you email me your mobile number ?

all the best Owen

Edited by owen bush

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just sent you a text Owen

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