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Can you tell what it is yet?


Simon Attwood
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:rolleyes:

 

managed to find a bit of ali on ebay & got it machined up ... ooow shiny

 

i'm getting there slowly but surely :wacko:

 

IMG_0214-1.jpg

"When our eyes see our hands doing the work of our hearts, the circle of Creation is completed inside us, the doors of our souls fly open and love steps forth to heal everything in sight."  Michael Bridge

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I dunno Pete, I don't see a broach slot for the drive, idler wheel maybe?

 

Simon, if that's aluminum, I hope it's not going in a rolling mill...

There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. Will Rogers

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I dunno Pete, I don't see a broach slot for the drive, idler wheel maybe?

 

Simon, if that's aluminum, I hope it's not going in a rolling mill...

 

My first thought was a rolling mill as well, but I sure hope thats not the case. I don't think the Al would hold of for very long at all.

 

I'll place my bet on it being an ornimental flag pole holder the the office desk.

Have you ever thought about the life of steel? It's interesting to think that you can control the fate of a piece of metal.

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I dunno Pete, I don't see a broach slot for the drive, idler wheel maybe?

 

Simon, if that's aluminum, I hope it's not going in a rolling mill...

 

Mike, I would have hoped you wouldn't have thought of me as so stupid by now :lol::lol::lol:

 

Yes Peter, it's a drive wheel for a grinder. The bore is 24.95mm to take a 25mm drive shaft (with a bit of assistance)

 

Ali cost me £6 ($10 ish) 3 inch chunk off a 6 inch round bar. Machining down to 150mm dia x 75mm width

 

Machining was zilch, nada ;)

"When our eyes see our hands doing the work of our hearts, the circle of Creation is completed inside us, the doors of our souls fly open and love steps forth to heal everything in sight."  Michael Bridge

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Anyone who can arrange for a really clean wheel like that knows exactly what they are doing. Good job Simon. The comment about the rolling mill bit was tongue in cheek.

 

I do really like the mortar idea, but iron would be best.

There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. Will Rogers

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Does the idler you mention equate to the tension/tracking wheel on my KMG clone? I used one of Rob Frink's tension/tracking wheels and it has a definite crown. Same for his drive wheel which I also used. A straight drive wheel does make sense though.

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Does the idler you mention equate to the tension/tracking wheel on my KMG clone? I used one of Rob Frink's tension/tracking wheels and it has a definite crown. Same for his drive wheel which I also used. A straight drive wheel does make sense though.

 

 

Yes, on a KMG the idler is also the tension/tracking wheel. I've heard it said that having 2 crowned wheels on a grinder means that they can fight against each other. Only 1 crowned wheel is necessary for tracking and I've got my idler wheel sorted already.

 

it's a slow build because I'm sneaking all the laser cutting and machining on to legit jobs at work to keep my costs down :ph34r:

"When our eyes see our hands doing the work of our hearts, the circle of Creation is completed inside us, the doors of our souls fly open and love steps forth to heal everything in sight."  Michael Bridge

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Gonna be a lot of nice fly wheel effect with that much mass left. Hard to start, but hard to stop too, eh ? :D

 

 

I'm figuring to put at least 2 horsies behind it, Howard, perhaps even 3, I'll make sure it'll get going easy enough ;)

 

another pic to follow ;)

 

and for those that are interested, I've done full AutoCAD drawings (in AC2000) but I'm using them as a guideline only and changing a few bits as I go

 

I've got a pretty good 1 inch belt sander, so rather than go for the 2 inch like the KMG, Iv'e gone an inch wider to give myself the option of running either 2 inch or 3 inch belts.

"When our eyes see our hands doing the work of our hearts, the circle of Creation is completed inside us, the doors of our souls fly open and love steps forth to heal everything in sight."  Michael Bridge

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Fitted on to the shaft

 

DSCF2593.jpg

 

Just waiting for the next set of laser cut parts ;)

 

don't tell the wife I put it on the sofa though!!

"When our eyes see our hands doing the work of our hearts, the circle of Creation is completed inside us, the doors of our souls fly open and love steps forth to heal everything in sight."  Michael Bridge

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... I've got a pretty good 1 inch belt sander, so rather than go for the 2 inch like the KMG, Iv'e gone an inch wider to give myself the option of running either 2 inch or 3 inch belts.

 

If you can get 3 hp, get it. If you have 3 inch belts available and you already have a 1 inch grinder for the small stuff, set up for the three inch belts. Horsepower and a wider belt make for more stable grinding and less wibble wobble in your bevels. You'll be able to pretty much rip each side of a knife to shape in a lot less passes. Ooo...get 24 grit and make it really interesting. You could probably sell the steel wool you'll make in the pile on the floor to all the guys making wootz and steel blooms. :lol:

There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. Will Rogers

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If you can get 3 hp, get it. If you have 3 inch belts available and you already have a 1 inch grinder for the small stuff, set up for the three inch belts. Horsepower and a wider belt make for more stable grinding and less wibble wobble in your bevels. You'll be able to pretty much rip each side of a knife to shape in a lot less passes. Ooo...get 24 grit and make it really interesting. You could probably sell the steel wool you'll make in the pile on the floor to all the guys making wootz and steel blooms. :lol:

 

 

What guys are they then, Mike? :lol:

 

Anyway, that depends upon whether Col is still speaking to me :wacko:

PS, I don't do wibble wobble on my bevels :rolleyes:

"When our eyes see our hands doing the work of our hearts, the circle of Creation is completed inside us, the doors of our souls fly open and love steps forth to heal everything in sight."  Michael Bridge

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What are the countersinks on the top side of the base plate for?

 

 

I'm really glad you asked that question :lol::huh::wacko::lol:

 

They were a mistake by the laser cutters. I gave them a drawing and the CSK was on the underside of the plate and they misread it. Fortunately it isn't an issue :rolleyes:

 

For neatness I was going to use all CSK screws rather than the hex heads I have seen others use. Because of the mistake on the base plate, I've had to use hex heads, but as it's unseen and will be on anti vibration machine mounts, it doesn't matter :rolleyes:

Edited by Simon Attwood

"When our eyes see our hands doing the work of our hearts, the circle of Creation is completed inside us, the doors of our souls fly open and love steps forth to heal everything in sight."  Michael Bridge

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wouldn't it be alright to turn this wheel w/in a .005" tolerance just buy turning the dia, parting from the parent stock leaving maybe .125" excess, drill and bore the centerhole, face off one end, facing off the other end to finish thickness, all the while using nonferrous shims to keep the jaws from marring it ??? is this the best way?

Edited by Ty Murch

.

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