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Ragnar238

keeping edges straight

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All the blades I make end up with some curve in them from the profile forging.  I use counter bends to keep from making question mark shaped knives, but was wondering how you folks do it?  Blades like seaxes drive me nuts, as I never seen to get the counter bend just right.

 

Any thoughts?

Jeff

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<font color='#000000'>All the blades I make end up with some curve in them from the profile forging.  I use counter bends to keep from making question mark shaped knives, but was wondering how you folks do it?  Blades like seaxes drive me nuts, as I never seen to get the counter bend just right.

 

Any thoughts?

Jeff</font>

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Jeff, Both of my teachers at the A.B.S. school used a different method. after a little bit of curve developed they would straighten by gentle hammering on the spine, kind of a straighten as you go process. It works great for me and I would suggest you try it. This method also encourages you to not forge too thin before your thermal cycles ,so you dont get a lot of decarb. Ironbasher

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everyones got a technique... you just have to find what your comfortable with...

- tapping the spine down often works well

 

also ...forge in your distal taper after beveling.... it will bring the tip back ...abit

 

 

Greg

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Ragnar - counter bends and spine hammering, as Greg and Basher already pointed out are good methods -- I usually end up using both of them. one method is re-shaping your hammer heads so the metal moves more on horizontal planes rather than smashing out on all sides equally. You can accomplish this by grinding some of the top and bottom off of a hammer face so it's striking surface more resembles a = shape than a + shape. Wayne Goddard has a great diagram of this in his book "the wonder of knifemaking".

 

I re-ground My 4 LB double face hammer like this, one side left regular. It can be very useful for somethings though it takes time getting used too, and as stated tends to make the blade stretch longer, rather than wider. It's an idea, and I have noticed it helps cut down on "curve"

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ragnar,

 

as the others have mentioned, everyone got his "own" way... but here's what I do:

 

I usually do not prebend / counterbend, as I didn't like that method quiet a lot... it made forging of straight bevels a bit difficult...

While working on the bevels, at the end of each cycle (befor I put the blade back to the forge) and sometimes just after I have taken the blade out again, I'll hammer it on the spine, with the blade lengthwise on the anvil (to assure it gets straight...) ...

it takes some "practice" but once you got the routine, it's no longer difficult to either keep some sort of curvature, or get it really straight or "recurved", whatever your design will be...

 

dan

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I o more ore less the same as dan only I use a vry large mallet, I keep it in a bucket of water inbetweem forging, I also use it to keep the blade flat.

 

Richard

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