Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Supposedly yes, but they're collectibles -- which means you may end up competing against collectors who're willing to pay more (maybe much more) than is justified if you only want a tool.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As has been said, they are collectable today. If you find one cheap and are looking for a user, you may be better off selling it for a profit and buying something that isn't being collected.

 

ron

Link to post
Share on other sites

collectible hammers? Incredible :blink: :blink:

 

I have an Atha hammer and is absolutely exceptional, i forge almost exclusively with that. I have found this hammer randomly in a store of military surplus I paid only 5 euro :lol: I am very happy because in Italy is impossible to find this type of hammers. I do not know how you call this type of shape, american blacksmith hammer?

 

IMG_0096.jpgIMG_0101.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
collectible hammers? Incredible :blink: :blink:

 

I have an Atha hammer and is absolutely exceptional, i forge almost exclusively with that. I have found this hammer randomly in a store of military surplus I paid only 5 euro :lol: I am very happy because in Italy is impossible to find this type of hammers. I do not know how you call this type of shape, american blacksmith hammer?

 

 

Yes, Americans will collect anything. :lol: The tool collectors are the worst, as they have driven up the price of the antique hand tools I like to use in woodworking. And then there are the worst of the worst, anvil collectors. :angry: I know of several who have up to a hundred anvils which they will never use or sell. :rolleyes:

 

That hammer pattern is called an Engineer's double-faced jack, believe it or not. Or a hand sledge, depending on whose tool catalog you go by. The American pattern blacksmith hammer is a type of cross-pein.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, Americans will collect anything. :lol: The tool collectors are the worst, as they have driven up the price of the antique hand tools I like to use in woodworking. And then there are the worst of the worst, anvil collectors. :angry: I know of several who have up to a hundred anvils which they will never use or sell. :rolleyes:

 

That hammer pattern is called an Engineer's double-faced jack, believe it or not. Or a hand sledge, depending on whose tool catalog you go by. The American pattern blacksmith hammer is a type of cross-pein.

 

O/T, but recently on another board a guy posted a link to a Craigslist ad by a fella in South Carolina who was selling anvils. Turns out he's a collector who wants to trade up from some of his less desirable (collectible) pieces. The photos in the ad were enough to make you cry. The guy seems to have a small warehouse full of nothing but anvils that he has absolutely no intention of using. I guess he just sits there among them and giggles or something.

Edited by Matt Bower
Link to post
Share on other sites
:o What a shame! Edited by Michael Pyron
Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, Americans will collect anything. :lol: The tool collectors are the worst, as they have driven up the price of the antique hand tools I like to use in woodworking. And then there are the worst of the worst, anvil collectors. :angry: I know of several who have up to a hundred anvils which they will never use or sell. :rolleyes:

 

That hammer pattern is called an Engineer's double-faced jack, believe it or not. Or a hand sledge, depending on whose tool catalog you go by. The American pattern blacksmith hammer is a type of cross-pein.

 

Oh Alan, many thanks for the lesson :lol: :lol:

This is a great hammer for me, forging is very accurate and clean than the normal hammer found in Italy.

 

Collectors of anvils (hundred anvils)... is absolutely incredible .... and very expensive :blink:

Link to post
Share on other sites

And very annoying... Blasted Anvil collectors...

 

Alright troops, form up! It's time we take back those anvils and put em to good use! Hammers and anvils forever!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...