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True or false!


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It seems to me that the members of this forum are a pretty educated, informed bunch. And from my experiance, it's always a fun time when people are slinging arround some pretty useless knowledge, so I propose a game. One poster gives out a peice of information, and the rest of us guess as to weather it's true or false. The OP (origional poster) then gives the right answer and referance to something that can prove it, like a website or movie or somesuch.

 

Example:

Poster one: you can make soap from animal fat, true or false?

Poster two: false!

Poster three: true!

Poster one: it's true! Referance www.imakesoap.com (not sure if that really exists, but whatever haha)

 

I'll start:

True or false, giving someone the rhododendron flower can be taken as a threat.

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I'll start:

True or false, giving someone the rhododendron flower can be taken as a threat.

 

Google takes all the fun out of these games:

 

"The flower symbolism associated with the rhododendron is beware and caution. Rhododendron means "rose tree." Some spices are toxic to animals and may have a hallucinogenic and laxative effect on humans, thus the symbolism related to warning and danger. Rhododendrons were originally found in Nepal. Today there are over 1,000 species of rhododendrons. Rhododendrons are the national flower of Nepal, the state flower of Sikkim in India, and the state flower of West Virginia and Washington in the United States. "

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  • 4 weeks later...

That is more of a value judgment. If it's your car that got tagged, it's vandalism, OTOH, I've seen some very powerful art on the side of buildings and bridges. I'd just as soon not have random tags on my ride, but I could see asking a tagger who's work you liked to paint your car.

 

Can you imagine riding around in a Big Daddy Roth tagged car! The would be cool.

 

Geoff

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Here's an old superstition that is commonly known here in the Ozarks but some of you in other parts of the country may not know it. Just to make it more fun I will make this multiple choise:

 

What should you do if a friend gives you a knife for a wedding present?

 

1) Say thank you and spit.

2) Throw it over your left shoulder.

3) Use it on your wife.

4) Give them a penny.

5) Cut both his & your palms and shake hands.

 

Gary

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Here's an old superstition that is commonly known here in the Ozarks but some of you in other parts of the country may not know it. Just to make it more fun I will make this multiple choise:

 

What should you do if a friend gives you a knife for a wedding present?

 

1) Say thank you and spit.

2) Throw it over your left shoulder.

3) Use it on your wife.

4) Give them a penny.

5) Cut both his & your palms and shake hands.

 

Gary

 

 

Save it! Cause one day you might want to use it on your wife!

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4) is what we do in Italy too.

 

 

I suspect that's one of the oldest knife-related rules, other than "don't cut yourself." :lol: Some kind of exchange must always take place, even if it's just a token, lest the blade take its own price in blood or friendship. :ph34r:

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4) Give them a penny

 

Wize guy eh? Nyuknyuknyuknyuk *Three stooges moment.*

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  • 1 month later...

4) give them a penny

In Cherokee tradition, unless payment is given for a knife, it is a symbol that the friendship has been cut in two.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Wow. Interesting to know! I had a friend of mine (who taught me how to make knives) give me a knife for free, because of good times forging together, even though i was originally supposed to pay 120$ for it, but he hadn't finished it until I had left to visit my girlfriend and I got it from his parents when I got back, as he had moved while I was gone.

Due to some fireball whiskey when he came back to visit, there was some bad blood between us and we never ended up sorting it out before he left.

He has recently moved back and things have been clearing up between us, the forging has been good and the feelings aswell

And i realize now that just as i am beginning to complete my best knife yet (in my opinion) which I intended as a gift to him, that I am finally completing the unfinished trade. ^_^

 

Okay so here is my question, the "blood groove" on some knives and swords, I have heard that it is so if your knife / sword gets stuck into someone, they will keep bleeding and die. True or false? what is the purpose of the blood groove?

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The whole "blood groove" thing is pretty much a myth made up by people who didn't know is my understanding. The actual purpose of a FULLER is to remove weight from the blade and sometimes make it more flexible (like in viking swords) without effecting the blades performance.

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The whole "blood groove" thing is pretty much a myth made up by people who didn't know is my understanding. The actual purpose of a FULLER is to remove weight from the blade and sometimes make it more flexible (like in viking swords) without effecting the blades performance.

 

No, wait. I heard it's because the body creates a suction and the knife gets stuck without the fuller to allow air in!

 

LOL. Some of the rumors/myths around fullers are funny.

 

Here's a good one for you: I was recently interviewing someone for a job. My office walls are covered with knives and swords (I don't sell what I make, so it tends to pile up.) Anyway, above my desk is a 1930's Shin Gunto Japanese Officers Katana that I obtained some time ago. Some of you might know that these semi-production swords used Western style damascus san mai construction. The guy I was interviewing looks up at the blade and says the following:

 

The Guy: "Oh wow. That's the folded steel the Japanese use in their swords."

 

Dave: "Uh huh."

 

The Guy: "Do you know how they get the pattern in it?"

 

Dave: "Yeah, actuallly I . . ."

 

The Guy (interrupting): "That swirly pattern comes from when they quench the blade by plunging it red hot into a living slave."

 

Dave: "Uh, no. It doesn't."

 

The Guy: "No really! That's how they do it."

 

Dave: "Um . . nope, that's really not how they do it. Actually I make . . ."

 

The Guy (again interrupting me): "I saw this great documentary on them. Did you know there's only two guys left in the world that make Japanese swords using the old fashioned techniques?"

 

Dave: "*Sigh* Really? Wow. Um. . . thanks for coming in. We'll get back to you."

 

True story.

 

Grins,

 

Dave

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