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Hello Gentlemen,

 

I'm building a Post anvil, since my old one turned out to be a dud. The Sea Robin style is what I'm after, though I plan on making its height fixed.

SR3.jpg

 

I bought this steel block for $115 (Php 5,500) at the scrap yard. The guy said it came from the old Clark air base in Pampanga, Philippines, and is already hardened.

 

1.jpg

 

Anyway, I plan on cutting it to my knuckle length using an angle grinder. Gonna be spending a lot of time with Mr. Makita.

 

2.jpg

 

Then weld 4pcs. 17" long angle bars to a 0.75cm thick steel base. This will tightly hold the post in place.

3.jpg

4.jpg

 

Question is, is this enough? Will it work fine? Does it look sturdy?

Do I need to put a block of wood (grains vertical) underneath the post? Or loose contact with the steel base is enough?

 

I need advice.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

-shinobi

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Woohoo, that's gonna be a sweet bladesmith's anvil, E!

 

If you're willing to go the whole 9 yards, yep, a sea-robin style mount will be the "cleanest". I think that post is heavy enough not to bounce around even if its not fixed.

 

As I mentioned before, a couple of other options are:

 

-set it in a small drum or a large. deep bucket and pour in some concrete.

 

-bury a couple of feet of it into the ground ( obviously that doesn't make it movable anymore) So you don't have to cut it.

 

...good luck with the angle grinder, you're gonna need a lotta' cutting discs! :P Find a 9" grinder, a bit more power plus you'll need something that can make deeper cuts than a 4" grinder. If it's hardened, maybe you can try scoring it deeply and breaking it off with a BIG hammer. Hehe

 

Edit:

Looks like me nd howard replied at the same time....erm. great minds think alike? :lol:

Edited by P.Abrera
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A piece of steel, prehardened, and 4 x 6 inches, is going to laugh at your angle grinder. It will take days worth of your time just to cut and then you will have to clean up and level the inevitable mess ups. If this were mine, I would call around and find someplace with the equipment to cut this and do a good job of it. Yes, it may cost but, it will be worth it. I would try the steelyards/steel distributors, the ones with the nice, expensive, chopsaws and bandsaws. The ideal would be a large metal bandsaw equipped with coolant and a carbide tipped blade.

 

Once this is cut into two pieces, you can mount both as anvils and keep the big one at home while using the smaller one for traveling and demonstrations.

 

Making the height adjustable, while more of a hassle, will make it easier to sell later on if you decide this is not the anvil for you. You can adjust the height with the setup you are talking about (four pieces of angle iron welded to a plate) by placing square plywood shims under the anvil to raise it. You may want to cut the block a little shorter, if you decide to go this route, to allow for the anvil to adjust lower than your ideal height.

 

~Bruce~

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I would sink it in the ground, if you're somewhere you want to stay for a while and won't be moving. You would get to keep the mass and it's stable. Like Bruce said, if it's hardened it's going to be almost impossible to get something that big cut down by hand. It's a nice piece of steel, I would just design around it and your budget. Just my opinion. I'm interested in seeing it when you're done. Regards, Jim

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Like everyone else thats commented, I don't recommend cutting the steel to height as that is a total waste of mass. However I would cut a few inches off the top to make it flat, take the extra piece and put a round and square hole in it, attach some angel iron like Chuck did on the Sea Robins and use that for your Hardy and Pritchel. It can sit right on top of your anvil and will work great.

 

 

The only reason to have a stand is to raise a Anvil to working height. Long post Anvils need to be lowered and for that you can either raise the surface of your working area or dig out a hole. I would prefer digging a hole, then pouring a concrete footing reinforced with steel. From there you set the anvil on the footing and tamp the earth back into the hole to make it stand on end. Do not get caught up in having a stand or tools hanging off your Anvil. There is a big advantage to being able to snug up to your Anvil in some situations, bulky stands will just create distance. Hanging tools off your anvil is not something I like but plenty of guys do it. .

 

 

One thing you might consider is having the face milled and hardened. If it will not harden with heat no worries, even mild steel will harden if you hit it enough times. For that matter there is no reason to mess around, you could just set it in the ground and start banging on it now. Then later cut it, mill it, or whatever after you got a feel for how it hits. You could find it is fine just as it is, don't over think it, in other words.

Anvl1.png

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Having taken a second look at your steel, I would not cut it at all. The steps on both sides will end up being used by you for all kinds of cool little things after you start using it. Just set in to height and flatten the top with a big grinder. If you do not have concrete a good sized rock down in hole will do fine for a footing, then just back fill the hole and tamp it down to stabilize the anvil.

 

Interesting that it came off Clark, even more interesting stuff from Clark is still showing up as I figured it had all been melted and recycled by now. Maybe now that the scrap market is down again I can find some more junkyard steel as I love the stuff. For two years nobody around here would sell off anything as it was all hauled of and smelted, now nobody wants the stuff, which is good for us.

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I did much the same as you are intending. I welded a piece of square tube to the foot plate, dropped the post into the tube. The last thing I did was to make up a bunch of short wooden wedges and srive them in around the gap between the post and the tube. It works just fine. I expected to have to re-set the wedges every so often, but that hasen't been the case, I just drove them in and that has been it.

 

You will probably want to weld some straps around your angle iron, just to keep them from opening up, but I think your design should work just fine.

 

Geoff

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Nice score! are there any machine shops left around after the base left?? any machine shop would have a horizontal bandsaw big enough to cut that. i wonder how hard the material is. that could rule out band machining, but so long as a file will bite a little (assuming you don't have a rockwell tester) maybe mid 50's C, it should cut fine as long as you slow the blade speed and the feed rate/force. also, like brent said, if you have a steel supplier, they may have a large chop saw so hardness wouldn't be an issue, however it may be more difficult to get them to cut it for you because they are a steel supplier, not a job shop.

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Ty,

 

I recently completed a post anvil of my own and your basic design is sound. You need to add four U shaped lengths of flat stock to your design. You will want to weld them to the about 1/4 of the length from the top of your angle iron uprights. This give the overall design good support and keeps the angle iron from bending or flexing under the hammering loads the anvil will take. Look at your first picture of the Sea Robin Anvil to see what I mean. Also if you cut off the post, I can guarantee the newly cut section will not be hardened. I highly doubt that large of a piece of square stock was through hardened. I suspect the two end sections and surfaces on the sides of the post were hardened and the center of the post is not hardened at all.

 

I would take the post to a machine shop, or to a buddy who had a metal bandsaw and have them make the cut. I will add a photo of the post anvil to this posting when I get home tonight.

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Thanks for the replies.

 

It seems everyone favored it being buried on the ground.

 

That seems like a sound idea, but the main reason I opted for the Sea Robin style is because my shop is perched on top our septic tank, which makes digging for a hole impossible. My work area is also very small, so a portable anvil which I can move around is convenient.

 

Most of the stuff from the scrap yard came from Clark. They have all sorts of cool stuff there.

 

Machine shops here only have large power hacksaws, but that only took an inch deep off that chunk, then it stopped biting.

 

Then I found a 14" chopsaw.

makita_cutting.jpg

 

So, I finally succeeded in cutting this behemoth with the help of a friend and Mr. Makita. It was a slow process because the thing is through-hardened. I sprayed water on the cut so it does not overheat.

cut1.jpg

 

Since we rotate the block every so often to get an efficient cutting angle, the surface became uneven and needed dressing with the angle grinder.

cut_face.jpg

 

The anvil face after being polished with a 60grit sand paper with wood backing.

face_1.jpg

 

There are still shallow pits that are really hard to remove, because the sandpaper can only do so much on a hardened surface.

face_2.jpg

 

You think this will work fine already?

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There are still shallow pits that are really hard to remove, because the sandpaper can only do so much on a hardened surface.

face_2.jpg

 

You think this will work fine already?

 

I think it will work fine at that level of finish

 

but it will work cleaner and more efficiently with less cleanup to do on the finished piece if you get the rest of those dips out.

Edited by stephanfowler
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Well, here it is, my new post anvil named "Ruben".

Image081.jpg

 

I got rid most of the pits in the face, so it's almost flat. I guess it's fine like that. This is rock solid, compared to my old London style anvil which feels "hollow" everytime you strike it.

 

After I applied epoxy primer.

Image083.jpg

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Great job! Congratulations on building such a useful tool for yourself. As you have noticed, having all the mass centered under the striking surface makes for a very nice anvil. When I saw the picture of the anvil face, without the dips sanded smooth, I though someone with poor hammer control had been pounding on it. Given enough time, and enough blows to the surface, an anvil can get beat up pretty badly. I have heard the theory espoused before, and it makes sense to me, that the anvil should be harder than the hammers striking it. The logic being that it is much easier to repair the hammer than the anvil. Just some food for thought since you are starting out with such a nice tool.

 

Also, like Dee said, I'm jealous! None of the scrapyards in the area, that allow blacksmiths to pick through their piles (all 1 of them), ever have anything of this size. On the other hand, even if I do want a post anvil, it would make anvil #4. So, I cannot bitch too much!

 

~Bruce~

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Well its turned out to look great, I was a little scared for you cutting into it having cut up a few pieces of railroad track myself and deciding it wasn't worth it afterwords with the mess and smoke. One of my friends has a giant sized band saw that can handle somewhere around 24 inch pipe and solid bar so I can cheat on the big stuff now, thus the not worth it.

 

 

What are you going to do with the cut off piece? It looks like it would make a great travel anvil if you ever go to any festivals or demonstrations. It also may make a great Japanese style ground anvil and you could weld up a small stand for it. Either way I'm sure you will find a good use for it or maybe think of something cool that nobody else has thought of.

 

 

Cant wait to see your new work off your new anvil,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Glad it worked out great for you,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, b.

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