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Face mount motor to KMG.


josh powell

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Anyone have experience or suggestions for mounting a baldor face mount 3hp 3450 rpm motor to a KMG? I bought a pair at a price that was way to good to pass up, but now I have to do the work to make them work. :unsure:

 

I'm thinking that I can probably fabricate a motor mount out of 1/2" plate, but I'm a little worried about tensioning the belt. I have a little mill that I'm installing in the shop, I could probably use it to cut slots for a sliding mount, but if there is a faster way, I would love to hear it. I also thought about building a 3rd pulley into the system for belt tension,

 

Additionally, I'm unsure as to whether I should just bolt the motor to the mount, or if I should worry about supporting the bulk of the motor beyond the mount to prevent vibration. I know that my Burr King's at work support the entire grinder assembly off of the face mount, so I suspect that is probably strong enough to support the weight of the motor alone.

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Anyone have experience or suggestions for mounting a baldor face mount 3hp 3450 rpm motor to a KMG? I bought a pair at a price that was way to good to pass up, but now I have to do the work to make them work. :unsure:

 

I'm thinking that I can probably fabricate a motor mount out of 1/2" plate, but I'm a little worried about tensioning the belt. I have a little mill that I'm installing in the shop, I could probably use it to cut slots for a sliding mount, but if there is a faster way, I would love to hear it. I also thought about building a 3rd pulley into the system for belt tension,

 

Additionally, I'm unsure as to whether I should just bolt the motor to the mount, or if I should worry about supporting the bulk of the motor beyond the mount to prevent vibration. I know that my Burr King's at work support the entire grinder assembly off of the face mount, so I suspect that is probably strong enough to support the weight of the motor alone.

 

 

one way is to put the motor on a plate with one side on hinges ( piano hinge) the weight of the motor may be enough tension if not simply add a bolt to pull it down

infinite edge cutlery

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Thanks John.

 

I'm more interested in techniques that have successfully been used for a face mount motor..

 

This is the motor I have: http://www.baldor.com/products/detail.asp?...ting=40CMB-CONT

 

As you can see, it does not have a base mount. As such, I have to fabricate that mount. I'm looking for solutions for that problem, specifically. I could fab an L shaped mount to bolt the motor on to, then mount that on a hinge to provide tension for the belt, but I'm not 100% convinced that it is the best way. What I'm really concerned about is whether or not I need to support the motor beyond bolting the face to an upright plate.

 

 

one way is to put the motor on a plate with one side on hinges ( piano hinge) the weight of the motor may be enough tension if not simply add a bolt to pull it down
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I made an L shaped bracket using angle iron and welded a hinge to the back side. I made a square out the angle and drilled holes to mount to the front of the motor then welded two legs on the square going back the length of the motor plus enough for a connector. Then welded a piece across the back to complete the L. I then used two longer bolts on the front with wing nuts that I can loosen and tilt the motor back when changing belt speed.

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Josh, I do not have direct experience of mounting a motor like this. But, keep in mind that that motor is designed to be mounted in this manner. The only reason to add a stiff leg on the back is if the mounting plate you fabricate has too much movement (slop). Make the hinging mechanism wide enough to provide good support. Make the mounting plate the same as if the motor bolted to it but add a vertical plate to it for the face mount, gusseting it to restrict movement. Welding supply stores sell weld on hinges that are pretty precise and would work well for this application.

Have fun.

Alden

Alden Sherrodd

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I did one. I welded an L out of 1/4" plate big enough to mount the motor. I put two gussets, one on each side. I did then make slotted holes so I could tension it. Of course this was a smaller motor, so you might have to up the thickness of the plate you use. Sorry, there is no easier way to do it except the hinge method, which I never really liked, and with a 3HP beast I wouldn't trust that method. I would want that puppy bolted down tight. Its a bit of work, but not that bad. And you will have a rock solid mount.

 

Tony G

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I did one. I welded an L out of 1/4" plate big enough to mount the motor. I put two gussets, one on each side. I did then make slotted holes so I could tension it. Of course this was a smaller motor, so you might have to up the thickness of the plate you use. Sorry, there is no easier way to do it except the hinge method, which I never really liked, and with a 3HP beast I wouldn't trust that method. I would want that puppy bolted down tight. Its a bit of work, but not that bad. And you will have a rock solid mount.

 

Tony G

 

This is from the maual for your motor:

 

Mounting The motor must be securely installed to a rigid foundation or mounting surface to

minimize vibration and maintain alignment between the motor and shaft load. Failure to

provide a proper mounting surface may cause vibration, misalignment and bearing

damage.

Foundation caps and sole plates are designed to act as spacers for the equipment they

support. If these devices are used, be sure that they are evenly supported by the

foundation or mounting surface.

After installation is complete and accurate alignment of the motor and load is

accomplished, the base should be grouted to the foundation to maintain this alignment.

The standard motor base is designed for horizontal or vertical mounting. Adjustable or

sliding rails are designed for horizontal mounting only. Consult your Baldor distributor or

authorized Baldor Service Center for further information.

 

This is from the spec sheet on your motor. I am not sure what this means by by all means contact your local dealer for mor information on this Mounting: F1 , at the bottom of the specs.

 

 

Specifications: VM3559

 

Catalog Number: VM3559

Specification Number: 35A13T123

Horsepower: 3

Voltage: 208-230/460

Hertz: 60

Phase: 3

Full Load Amps: 8.1-7.6/3.8

Usable at 208 Volts: 8.1

RPM: 3450

Frame Size: 56C

Service Factor: 1.15

Rating: 40C AMB-CONT

Locked Rotor Code: K

NEMA Design Code: B

Insulation Class: F

Full Load Efficiency: 82.5

Power Factor: 89

Enclosure: TEFC

Baldor Type: 3528M

DE Bearing: 6205

ODE Bearing: 6203

Electrical Specification Number: 35WGT123

Mechanical Specification Number: 35A013

Base: N

Mounting: F1

 

 

 

* For certified information, contact your local Baldor office

Edited by CC Knives

C Craft Customs ~~~ With every custom knife I build I try to accomplish three things. I want that knife to look so good you just have to pick it up, feel so good in your hand you can't wait to try it, and once you use it, you never want to put it down ! If I capture those three factors in each knife I build, I am assured the knife will become a piece that is used and treasured by its owner! ~~~ C Craft

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