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I just got a line on a 100 lb. little giant and have a fue questions. What is a fair price range, it is in good working order, how heavy is it, do you think i could run it in a normal California naborhood or will it make to big of a racket?? Thanks Scott

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Heavy, on the order of 3500 lb plus or minus a few.

 

Is there such a thing as a normal California neighborhood? Sorry, I couldn't resist having lived in the East Bay for several years. Operating it will depend on your neighbors. It's a hundred pounds of iron striking and clacking in eccentric motion.

 

A good used rebuilt 50 lb hammer would run 4500.00 USD for comparison purposes.

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I just got a line on a 100 lb. little giant and have a fue questions. What is a fair price range, it is in good working order, how heavy is it, do you think i could run it in a normal California naborhood or will it make to big of a racket?? Thanks Scott

 

 

Yeah, if you live at the end of a runway you might get away with it. :rolleyes:

 

Dennis K

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I have a 100 lb Little Giant, been using it hard to over 10 years. Great hammer! I paid $2500 and had to put another $2000 in it but it's been worth every penny.

 

They're not quiet hammers, actually no 100 pounder is quiet. If it's set up inside a shop, the noise shouldn't be a problem.

Edited by Don Hanson
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Don't forget having to put down a good foundation under the hammer. A smith on the Knife Network posted the process that he had to go through to install a large mechanical hammer. He had to move it to his shop and had to rent a crane a few times to get it moved around. Granted that this was a really large machine but he had to have a five foot thick concrete foundation poured that was isolated from the rest of his shop floor to keep it from damaging the foundation to his barn. Make sure that you check out all you city ordinances concerning the operation of machinery and noise in a residential area.

 

Doug Lester

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Even if there's no specific city ordinance that applies (and there probably is), you could still be subject to a common law nuisance action. Make sure you have a plan to keep the noise and vibration way down.

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Don't forget having to put down a good foundation under the hammer. A smith on the Knife Network posted the process that he had to go through to install a large mechanical hammer. He had to move it to his shop and had to rent a crane a few times to get it moved around. Granted that this was a really large machine but he had to have a five foot thick concrete foundation poured that was isolated from the rest of his shop floor to keep it from damaging the foundation to his barn. Make sure that you check out all you city ordinances concerning the operation of machinery and noise in a residential area.

 

Doug Lester

 

 

That is a thick pad - I watched the building of a 10 meter satellite dish, and the used a double pad. The lowest one was about 20 ft across and 2 ft thick, with heavy reenforcement ( rebar up to an 1 1/2 thick ), the second was even with the ground was again 2 ft thick, but this time the pad was only 8-10 ft across, but it had even more reenforcement - from what they told me the double pad was more effective than a single pad of the same thickness, because the top pad spread the weight of the dish over the bottom pad, like an arch spreads the weight of a wall over a door.

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That is a thick pad - I watched the building of a 10 meter satellite dish, and the used a double pad. The lowest one was about 20 ft across and 2 ft thick, with heavy reenforcement ( rebar up to an 1 1/2 thick ), the second was even with the ground was again 2 ft thick, but this time the pad was only 8-10 ft across, but it had even more reenforcement - from what they told me the double pad was more effective than a single pad of the same thickness, because the top pad spread the weight of the dish over the bottom pad, like an arch spreads the weight of a wall over a door.

 

 

Consider that the pad for the dish is supporting the weight of the dish and resisting any leverage applied by the dish from wind action. That's a solid foundation, but a dish doesn't go BANG BANG BANG for long without somebody stopping it so they can get those channels back on the air. I wonder if a 100lb hammer applies 100lb of force to the foundation, or does the base absorb much of it. OR- Does the force of the hammer applied to the base cause 3500lb to move ever so much applying THAT much force to the base.

A five foot thick pad does seem like a lot.

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Thanks to all, I got a better look at the hammer today it has a small crack in the right hand arm, The babbit bearings have bin replaced with bronze, there is an extra set of dies and a new spring. The price is 2,500$ what bo you think? Scott

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That seems like a pretty fair price for a 100 pounder, I have seen many 25 or 50 lb LG go for that price and I consider this a better hammer.

Chris

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