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Archie Zietman

Installing an on-off, and thoroughly confused

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Been a long time since I've been here. Hello again!

I have a basic electronics question: I want to install an on-off switch to my blower (one of my teachers a few years back had a light switch spliced between the blower and plug I think? It was definitely a light switch). So I bought a switch, but it only has 3 wires: 1 hot, 1 neutral and 1 ground. I'd think you'd want two of each in order to splice it into a power cord? How comes it that you only need one trio of wires? I'm just utterly baffled, and am in need of pictures or drawings to explain how it is done.

 

Thanks eversomuch,

Archie

 

P.S. Can you tell I'm not an electrician? :)

 

edited for clarity and a typo

Edited by Archie Zietman

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Hello.

Been a long time since I've been here. Hello again! I have a basic electronics question: I want to install an on-off switch to my blower (one of my teachers a few years back had a light switch spliced between the blower and plug). I bought a switch, but it only has 3 wires: a hot, a neutral and a ground. I'd think you'd want two of each in order to splice in into a power cord, do you not need that? How does one do it? I'm just completely baffled, and am in need of pictures or drawings to explain how it is done.

 

Thanks eversomuch,

Archie

 

P.S. Can you tell I'm not an electrician? :)

 

 

normally you only switch the hot on and off.

 

so most simple switches have two terminal ........... you cut the hot/black power wire and place the switch where you cut.

 

I AM NOT SURE ABOUT YOUR SWITCH WITH THREE WIRES

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The green one is earth ground, so that you cannot electrocute yourself if the switch fails. You only need break the hot lead with the switch (using the other two terminals, not the green one). If in the US, the hot wire is black, and it goes to the narrow blade of a polarized plug if everything is normal. The white wire is neutral, which in the case of US 120 VAC is also earth ground, and the green wire is ground only (earth). I think the European color code is different, and I do not remember where you are, nor does your info say. I hope that helps. :)

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Instead of a light switch I drilled a .25" hole in the cover of the electric box on my blower and installed a simple toggle switch...makes for a neat installation...

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The green one is earth ground, so that you cannot electrocute yourself if the switch fails. You only need break the hot lead with the switch (using the other two terminals, not the green one). If in the US, the hot wire is black, and it goes to the narrow blade of a polarized plug if everything is normal. The white wire is neutral, which in the case of US 120 VAC is also earth ground, and the green wire is ground only (earth). I think the European color code is different, and I do not remember where you are, nor does your info say. I hope that helps. :)

 

in the usa:

 

neutral is the low side and carries current attached to ground only at the service entrance ime

 

green is earth ground normally carries no current there for safety

Edited by john marcus

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Here are some pictures. There is a fourth wire which is for 3-way installations, unsure whether I need it (the red one with the little flag-notice on it). The red wires both have a temperature marking on them (105 degrees C), so I'm guessing they're hot. I need to splice this thing into the middle of a wire, like an extension cord, and need some help. I hope the pictures help.

front.jpg

back.jpg

Edited by Archie Zietman

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Here are some pictures. There is a fourth wire which is for 3-way installations, unsure whether I need it (the red one with the little flag-notice on it). The red wires both have a temperature marking on them (105 degrees C), so I'm guessing they're hot. I need to splice this thing into the middle of a wire, like an extension cord, and need some help. I hope the pictures help.

 

 

ok.........you bought a speed control not a simple switch.

 

you must check to see that the type of motor you will be controlling is compatible with the speed control

 

 

based on available info my best guess.........( did it come with an instruction sheet ?? anything on the case ???)

 

green to the blower case

tape the extra wire for 3 way not used

black wire to hot from wall ( black in the usa)

red to motor hot that was connected to hot from wall.

 

 

note not all motors are happy running on a speed control

Edited by john marcus

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sorry I have to say this there is no neutral on a switch.

 

 

some circuits switch both neutral and hot. never seen it in a house though :)

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It looks like what you have is a household dimmer switch..Guess you want to use this to control the blower speed..Why??....all blower forges I've seen have the airflow controlled by a gate on the blower controlling how much air goes in thus how much goes out....It's mechanical and works great...good luck,let us know how it works out....but for simplicity you do not have to reinvent the wheel.

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If the motor is AC (It should say on the label), a dimmer won't work very well. In fact, it'll downright screw up your motor. You should only use a dimmer (aka pot, potentiometer, variable resistor for ease of searching for information) on a DC (Direct Current) motor. If you've never tried, here's what happens. On a DC motor, the motor spins slower and with less force as you decrease the voltage and current going in to the motor. With an AC motor, which relies on the alternating push and pull of (typically) the 60Hz your house outputs, the motor won't catch ever push or pull, and will start to vibrate excessively, slowing the fan down in the process but not in the way you would want. Also, it doesn't save anything as far as power goes.

 

At least, I THINK that's what's going on with an AC motor...

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