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Jesus and Walter smelting again


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I must admit, that is a sweet little furnace - are the construction details posted?

 

If so ( I must have missed them ) where exactly are they?

Once you can accept the universe as matter expanding into nothing that is something, wearing stripes with plaid comes easy.

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This was the most productive smelt that we've done at my place. We pulled 12 pounds of more or less clean bloom straight out of the furnace. Today I picked through all the junk scattered on my driveway and found another 7 lbs of bits and pieces. Some of that is cast iron and other low quality stuff -- but some was decent. We only put 40 pounds of ore in the furnace, so the total yield was a hair under 50% -- by far the best yield rate I've ever had. In my early smelts I felt good if I broke 20%. I don't think we've had a yield that good in any of the smelts we've done at Jesus's either...but Jesus may be able to correct me on that. I only have a logbook for the smelts we've done at my place.

 

We spark tested a bunch of pieces from the bloom yesterday and it looked pretty good. But you have to forge it before you really know if you've ended up with good steel or insanely expensive scrap metal.

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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Nice job, guys! Looks like fun, rain and all. Was that your Spanish Red ore, Jesus?

 

It was lots of fun. We used what I think it's called specularite. Just another form of hematite but heavier and denser so that it doesn't blow out of the furnace.

 

he he he

That's a monster, how much did it weigh?

 

Not so big, Skip, but one of the best yields if not the best for a furnace of this scale. We run into some trouble tapping the slag and then it started to rain so we called it quits before planned. How did your smelt with Lee go?

Enjoy life!

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I've added a couple of pictures. The first I added just because it looks cool. Talk about a fiery beard! Jesus has a fiery head.

 

The second two are shown for academic interest. Part of the post-smelt process is busting up the bloom and sorting the pieces by spark testing them. Here, I'm spark testing various pieces of the bloom. The first shows a fairly crappy piece of the bloom -- relatively low in carbon (for our tastes anyway), not throwing very good sparks. The second throws a greater density and quantity of spark...but also (and this is a little harder to see), the sparks divide and send out stars of secondary sparks very soon after coming off the grinder -- as opposed to lower carbon steel which sends out sparks that tend to extend further from the grinder before they extinguish themselves.

 

may_2009_smelt_3.jpg

may_2009_smelt_6.jpg

may_2009_smelt_7.jpg

Edited by Walter Sorrells

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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I've added a couple of pictures. The first I added just because it looks cool. Talk about a fiery beard! Jesus has a fiery head.

 

The second two are shown for academic interest. Part of the post-smelt process is busting up the bloom and sorting the pieces by spark testing them. Here, I'm spark testing various pieces of the bloom. The first shows a fairly crappy piece of the bloom -- relatively low in carbon (for our tastes anyway),

snip

 

So what do you guys do with the those parts of blooms that don't meet your standards - remelt?

Once you can accept the universe as matter expanding into nothing that is something, wearing stripes with plaid comes easy.

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So what do you guys do with the those parts of blooms that don't meet your standards - remelt?

 

Mostly they join the amorphous and slightly ominous looking piles of assorted unidentifiable crap that fills my shop. All carefully bagged and neatly labelled, though. (I'm serious!) I figure one day it'll all come in handy for something. I have messed around with mixing lower carbon pieces with cast iron and squashing them until they're homogeneous.

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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What are your thoughts of just running them back through the furnace, for reprocessing?

Once you can accept the universe as matter expanding into nothing that is something, wearing stripes with plaid comes easy.

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I must admit, that is a sweet little furnace - are the construction details posted?

 

If so ( I must have missed them ) where exactly are they?

 

Yeh I would also like to know some details on the furnace. I have somewhat of a shell but the linings I have been trying don't seem to be up to the task.

Bill Burke

ABS Master Smith

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This furnace is quite simple. It is the first design I came up with. Basically is a hot water heater steel shell tank divided in 3 sections. The two upper sections are created by casting a refractory made of sand with a little cement. You can use a round form in the center of 8-10 inches in diameter to mold the refractory. The lower section has the holes for the tuyeres and the tap arches. Take a look at the thread called "From dust to edge" which is pinned somewhere in the forum for more details.

Enjoy life!

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Thank you ,

 

One question that I didn't see asked in the pinned thread-

 

How much do each of those sections weigh?

Once you can accept the universe as matter expanding into nothing that is something, wearing stripes with plaid comes easy.

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Yeah, somewhere in that range. Each one takes about three fifty pound bags of sand to make. Putting the top section on by yourself is kinda like that thing in the strongman competitions where these freakish Norwegian guys lift massive round stones onto a little platform that's about chest height. A little nerve-wracking.

 

By the way, here's a link to another youtube video about the smelt.

 

 

I dunno. A lot. About 100-150 lbs???

Walter, do you know?

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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What are your thoughts of just running them back through the furnace, for reprocessing?

 

If you put a large quantity of them in, they'd end up coming out as cast iron most likely.

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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Share on other sites
Yeah, somewhere in that range. Each one takes about three fifty pound bags of sand to make. Putting the top section on by yourself is kinda like that thing in the strongman competitions where these freakish Norwegian guys lift massive round stones onto a little platform that's about chest height. A little nerve-wracking.

 

Ouch!

 

Is all that sand necessary?

 

I like the design, but since I don't have a partner, I may have to think of ways to reduce the weight to more manageable proportions. I wonder if more sections of individually lighter weight would work?

 

 

By the way, here's a link to another youtube video about the smelt.

 

 

 

Cool video! Who do I need to talk to to get a copy that I can view off line?

 

I noticed that you have to break the bloom out of the bottom section, how much damage to the lining occurs?

Once you can accept the universe as matter expanding into nothing that is something, wearing stripes with plaid comes easy.

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