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Hamon


Isaiah Lake

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The simplistic answer is to put clay or refractory cement on the parts of the blade you don't want to harden and then heat and quench as normal after the clay dries. The transition between the coated areas and the bare area forms the hamon. For info on how to create different styles of hamons in great detail, Walter Sorells has created a GREAT video on the process that he sells on his website. http://www.waltersorrells.com/blades/hamon%20video.htm

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The simplistic answer is to put clay or refractory cement on the parts of the blade you don't want to harden and then heat and quench as normal after the clay dries. The transition between the coated areas and the bare area forms the hamon. For info on how to create different styles of hamons in great detail, Walter Sorells has created a GREAT video on the process that he sells on his website. http://www.waltersorrells.com/blades/hamon%20video.htm

thanks

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One question that I have about blades with hamons...if the spine doesn't harden do you still have to temper it?

 

 

Well you don't have to temper the spine independently. But depending on the steel used, its a good idea to temper the sword. Some people that use 1050 don't temper them since 1050 will only get to about 58Rc. but its a good idea to temper it anyway at 250 to 300 F just to relieve any stress. If you use a higher carbon steel that will get harder then that you should temper it just like any other blade.

 

Tony G

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Thanks...I am working on a fighting knife right now and was thinking of going with a hamon on it. It's 5160 so I guess the temper is still in the books

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Don't expect to get much hamon activity with 5160, it will show a hamon but not nearly as well as 10xx or 'w' series steels. I usually edge quench 5160...

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
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  • 2 weeks later...
so the line will show after polishing? or is there an etchant involved?

Depending upon the steel, quenching method, and finish, the hamon can be anywhere from almost impossible to spot to quite bold and obvious, without an etch. A good etch will make it more apparent, as will using a more shallow-hardening steel, and a faster quench. It depends on what you are after. Edge-quenched 1095 often shows a very visible transition with a 600grit finish without any etch, but try and photograph it..... :rolleyes:

 

Sometimes its obvious at 50grit, sometimes you have to chase it. There are many, many variables.....

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

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