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woodknack

My First Homemade Neck Knife

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Well Here is my first homemade neck knife. Please tell me what you think. The blade was cut out of a 10" circular saw blade. I am hooked on this hobby now! I have a few more I want to make but im going to add micarta handles to them. I also have some Kydex coming so I can make a shealth for it. The blade looked alot better just blued. But I read somewhere about etching it in ferric chloride. I did that and thats what made the spots on the blade.I think I liked it better just blued. Oh well it was just a first knife anyway. Im sure i'll improve on the next knife.

 

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DSC_0001-3.jpg

Edited by woodknack

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nice design very practical i like it.

 

Thanks! I think it will look really good with micarta handles. I have blue jeans and some green jeans all stripped so I can start making the handle material. Need to get some epoxy and nice clamps before I dive into that.

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Just wanted to show you what the blade looks like after I plasma torch it out of the saw blade.

 

DSC_0034.jpg

 

This is one that I just started to sand and shape.

 

DSC_0035.jpg

 

Here are the two together for a better look.

 

DSC_0038.jpg

 

I think i am going to put a nice handle on this one and make it a nice hunter/skinner knife.

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Nice first, not too bad at all, how did you heat treat it?

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Nice first, not too bad at all, how did you heat treat it?

I was very careful not to over heat the blade. I dont think i need to heat treat it. the blade was already hardened. I sanded the blade without gloves so when it started to get hot to the touch I dipped it in water. The first knife I have done is razor sharp! After I make the sheath for it I'll put it trough the test( I'll bring it to work where I cut lots of boxes and see how it compares to my kershaw chive that I use daily.). Im thinking it should be a great blade. This is a learning lesson for me. And Im having fun doing it. And really all I have invested in the projects is pretty much just time!

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If you cut that out with a plasma cutter or a torch then I would think the steel around the cut is not going to be properly heat treated any more, most importantly the cutting edge section. I think it'll perform much better if you normalize it 3x, quench it in preheated oil, then temper it back at around 400-450 for an hour or 2, some people even repeat this step 3 times. I just think it'd make that pretty blade worth more and work better.

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If you cut that out with a plasma cutter or a torch then I would think the steel around the cut is not going to be properly heat treated any more, most importantly the cutting edge section. I think it'll perform much better if you normalize it 3x, quench it in preheated oil, then temper it back at around 400-450 for an hour or 2, some people even repeat this step 3 times. I just think it'd make that pretty blade worth more and work better.

Maybe your right. I plasma cut it back far enough so I could sand down past the dark color to the the regular color of the steel. I think It will be just fine. One good thing about the plasma it that it goes fast and doesnt heat up a very big area. But I may try to heat treat this one. Havent got that far yet. But something to think about anyway. Thanks...

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It would probably be best to just go ahead and anneal the steel (easy to work with) and then harden after you are done.

 

Just remember, sharpness is NOT a determining factor of steel hardness. You can make mild steel sharp, but that doesn't mean it can hold that edge for long.

 

Run the file test on the edge. If the file 'skips' across the edge without cutting in, then the edge is hard. If it bites in, it isn't hardened enough. When you experience this you will know the difference. I would suggest doing the test on a piece of mild or annealed steel and then comparing it to a piece of steel you KNOW has been hardened 60RC or above. The first time I experience it, I was amazed at how big a difference there really was.

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It would probably be best to just go ahead and anneal the steel (easy to work with) and then harden after you are done.

 

Just remember, sharpness is NOT a determining factor of steel hardness. You can make mild steel sharp, but that doesn't mean it can hold that edge for long.

 

Run the file test on the edge. If the file 'skips' across the edge without cutting in, then the edge is hard. If it bites in, it isn't hardened enough. When you experience this you will know the difference. I would suggest doing the test on a piece of mild or annealed steel and then comparing it to a piece of steel you KNOW has been hardened 60RC or above. The first time I experience it, I was amazed at how big a difference there really was.

 

Well a file doesnt touch it! it just glides across doesnt bite in at all. As far as annealing, well looks like I already got the shape I want its just sanding time now. The first blade I made I had to heat up a spot on the top of the handle with a torch so I could drill the hole in it. A drill bit would not even put a dent in it before I heated the spot up.

 

Thats why I want to see how long my other blade will hold an edge. I know it took awhile to put a edge on it. Maybe I need to put it trough a cutting test. Maybe some rope or something.

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OK what If I wanted to try to harden the blade. What steps should I use?

 

I know the blade is very hard now so should I anneal first?

 

Can I just heat the blade red hot and soak it in oil?

 

This is all new to me. Id like any help.

 

Do I need to resand the blade after I oil dip it?

 

The blade is very thin. Like a 1/16th of an inch.

 

How do you guys heat your oil before dipping the blade in it?

 

questions questions......LOL

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If it where me i would hold off and save the heat treat for your next knife honestly...... that is if it holds an edge your happy with.

 

if its under a 16th total thickness and already ground to an edge its gonna be hell to keep the warp out of it expecially if this is one of your first times doing it. for stock that think i do HT before i even start grinding and then just take it slow the 1/16" O1 i have will get waves in the edge if i try and take it down before i HT it

 

Hope this helps

 

~~DJ

 

PS if the edge dosnt hold up and you dont mind the risk of killing it it would be a good learning experience. heat it up to non magnetic then quench in warm oil vertically and try not to move it to much then as soon as you take it out of the oil (20-45 seconds should do it) clamp it in some thing to take the warp out (if it breaks this is where it will happen) but be quick about it and then leave it there to cool to room temp. after this temper at 350 in an oven 3 times for an hour each.

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If it where me i would hold off and save the heat treat for your next knife honestly...... that is if it holds an edge your happy with.

 

if its under a 16th total thickness and already ground to an edge its gonna be hell to keep the warp out of it expecially if this is one of your first times doing it. for stock that think i do HT before i even start grinding and then just take it slow the 1/16" O1 i have will get waves in the edge if i try and take it down before i HT it

 

Hope this helps

 

~~DJ

 

PS if the edge dosnt hold up and you dont mind the risk of killing it it would be a good learning experience. heat it up to non magnetic then quench in warm oil vertically and try not to move it to much then as soon as you take it out of the oil (20-45 seconds should do it) clamp it in some thing to take the warp out (if it breaks this is where it will happen) but be quick about it and then leave it there to cool to room temp. after this temper at 350 in an oven 3 times for an hour each.

 

Thanks I may give that a try just becouse I have never done that before and it would be good practice.

 

What should I clamp it in? Will 2 pieces of wood?

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Hmmm....Where to start without taking up 10 pages......lol

 

No need to anneal now, but you do need to normalize. Heat the blade to critical checking with a magnet, (steel becomes non-magnetic at critical) pull the blade out and immediately allow it to air cool somewhere wind isnt blowing on it, but you dont want it resting against something either. Some people clamp the tang in something, I just hold it down in a metal container until it cool, it doesn't take long. Once the steel is at least below black heat you repeat this process 2 more times.

Now you should have a refined grain structure in the steel and are ready to quench. Bring the blade back up to non-mag, but this time dunk the work into a metal container of oil. Hold there until it's cooled to about 400F or so, (only takes a few seconds) the remove to inspect for warping. If it DID warp, you can still bend it back straight with your gloved hands if you're quick enough while the steel's still cooling. I forgot to mention it helps to heat the oil to about 120F before quenching, I do this by simply setting the container near the forge until it's hot enough, just dont spill it! You can wipe the oil off the blade now to inspect for cracks but it's very important to get the blade into the oven ASAP for tempering, one little drop onto a hard surface and that knifes going to look more like a broken glass than a blade. Temper the blade back in the oven at around 400F-450F depending on the steel, size, intended use etc. for either 3 cycles of an hour each, or one good 2 hour cycle with a very slow cool-down. Now you're ready to clean up and finish!

 

Another note, dull the edge back before all of this to at least a mm or 2 to avoid overheating the edge or cracking there.

 

EVERYONE here does this a little differantly and even myself use several differant methods depending on the blade but this is just a pretty straight forward simplistic method that should work fairly well for the blade you're making, hope this helps, Michael.

Edited by Michael Pyron

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Hmmm....Where to start without taking up 10 pages......lol

 

No need to anneal now, but you do need to normalize. Heat the blade to critical checking with a magnet, (steel becomes non-magnetic at critical) pull the blade out and immediately allow it to air cool somewhere wind isnt blowing on it, but you dont want it resting against something either. Some people clamp the tang in something, I just hold it down in a metal container until it cool, it doesn't take long. Once the steel is at least below black heat you repeat this process 2 more times.

Now you should have a refined grain structure in the steel and are ready to quench. Bring the blade back up to non-mag, but this time dunk the work into a metal container of oil. Hold there until it's cooled to about 400F or so, (only takes a few seconds) the remove to inspect for warping. If it DID warp, you can still bend it back straight with your gloved hands if you're quick enough while the steel's still cooling. I forgot to mention it helps to heat the oil to about 120F before quenching, I do this by simply setting the container near the forge until it's hot enough, just dont spill it! You can wipe the oil off the blade now to inspect for cracks but it's very important to get the blade into the oven ASAP for tempering, one little drop onto a hard surface and that knifes going to look more like a broken glass than a blade. Temper the blade back in the oven at around 400F-450F depending on the steel, size, intended use etc. for either 3 cycles of an hour each, or one good 2 hour cycle with a very slow cool-down. Now you're ready to clean up and finish!

 

Another note, dull the edge back before all of this to at least a mm or 2 to avoid overheating the edge or cracking there.

 

EVERYONE here does this a little differantly and even myself use several differant methods depending on the blade but this is just a pretty straight forward simplistic method that should work fairly well for the blade you're making, hope this helps, Michael.

 

Thank you very much! very informative! I think im going to give it a try! only problem is I dont have a forge. Maybe I can heat the blade with a torch until it get red hot. Or demagnetized.

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Thank you very much! very informative! I think im going to give it a try! only problem is I dont have a forge. Maybe I can heat the blade with a torch until it get red hot. Or demagnetized.

 

 

You can heat with a torch but it can be tricky be careful to get it even before quench. It helps if you have some firebrick to build a small forge shape out of and then use a rosebud to heat the interior of the "forge" with. I Heat treated my first 5 knives in coffee can lined with Kaowool using a propane torch.

 

~~DJ

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I think im going to give it a try! only problem is I dont have a forge.

 

LOL, come on now, everyone has a forge! Can you dig a small hole? You got a hairdryer? Then you got a forge! Seriously, that's all it is. You can try the torch thing but it's a pain, just build a fire in a hole or old grill or something and blow, it's that simple!

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Ok got my kydex and rivets the other day so I made a homemade press and proceeded to try and make a sheath for the first neck knife. Here is my attempt.

I'm happy with it! and the blade snaps right in.

 

DSC_0002_3.jpg

 

DSC_0003_3.jpg

 

Here is a picture to show the size of the knife.

 

DSC_0001_3.jpg

Edited by woodknack

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Very nice!

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