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john marcus

ROLLER MILL BUILD STARTING

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ok last chance to make corrections before welding. everything is working. the process will be to tack weld a bit and check the top roll and welded a little etc.

dcam.jpg

dlastchance.jpg

drolls.jpg

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thats looking mighty familiar :)

looks great!

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thats looking mighty familiar :)

looks great!

 

 

its your neighbor's plans converted to all inch parts :)

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tomorrow is time to mount the drive and beef up the welds........cant wait :)

 

also they are a few small parts to add still........spring and lever stop, top plate and motor mounts

efront.jpg

eleftside.jpg

esector.jpg

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i believe this is my first choice for the motor and gear position as it keeps the center of gravity low.

motorposition.jpg

Edited by john marcus

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Looks great John DO IT! Man I can't wait to see what it can do.

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ok progress on motor and gear mount.

 

i mounted the gear to a large piece of channel and am aligning it to the frame.

fmotormount2.jpg

fmotormount.jpg

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Looking really good. Nice job with clean work.

 

One question, is that plate going to stay there that the motor and gear mount are on? If it covers the back, you won't be able to pass a long piece of material between the rollers, it will hit that plate. Guess how I figured that one out..... :huh:

 

Jamie

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Looking really good. Nice job with clean work.

 

One question, is that plate going to stay there that the motor and gear mount are on? If it covers the back, you won't be able to pass a long piece of material between the rollers, it will hit that plate. Guess how I figured that one out..... :huh:

 

Jamie

 

 

thanks for the reminder...........i might have missed it until..............

 

it is a c channel............i guess it will need a window :wacko:

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ok now featuring the polarbear window :lol:

 

 

hoping to wire the motor up tomorrow and see what turns !

hview1.jpg

hview2.jpg

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If at all possible can you take some video of it in use? I grasp the basic idea of how it works, but would like to see it in action.

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John, you did a top notch job! Does the roller go away from you or towards you?

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John, you did a top notch job! Does the roller go away from you or towards you?

 

 

towards you is the safe direction to run it

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got the roller mill running today.......!!!!!! i rolled out some aluminum tig rod into ribbon.......hopefully tomorrow i can get time to roll something hot :)

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Congratlations. Great to follow your project!!!

 

I'm new to this thread, and I have Just several days using a mill that a friend lent me.

To my untrained eye, it looks like the design would be improved by increasing the size of the rollers and driving both rollers.

I'm sure this would complicate the design but the results might be worth the trouble. Especially when working red hard billets.

I was also thinking of using hydraulic motors to power the rollers, using my Hydraulic press power pack and flow controlles to give precise speed controll when timiing the rollers.

Please critique my ideas,.

SeaRobin

Edited by SeaRobin

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I'm new to this thread, and I have Just several days using a mill that a friend lent me.

To my untrained eye, it looks like the design would be improved by increasing the size of the rollers and driving both rollers.

I'm sure this would complicate the design but the results might be worth the trouble. Especially when working red hard billets.

I was also thinking of using hydraulic motors to power the rollers, using my Hydraulic press power pack and flow controlles to give precise speed controll when timiing the rollers.

Please critique my ideas,.

SeaRobin

 

 

hydraulics seem fine to me for power. i am not sure speed control is important but i have a vfd on a 3 phase motor just in case i want to try it.

 

larger rolls will reduce the pressure on the material ( larger surface area in contact) and cool the material faster same reason.

 

from my limited experience and comments i have read slippage doesnt seem to be a problem........maybe it is for red hard materials.....

 

 

thanks for your thoughts

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ok.....tried it out on a heavy piece of W2.

 

shot with quarter is the before. i ran it through several times. the roller is not braced yet so it took it easy and was very pleased with the results.

 

also i have to move the mill near the forge for obvious reasons.

 

next step will be to cut off a piece of W2 and use tongs so it can be turned end for end in the roller mill.

jbefore.jpg

jafter.jpg

jrolling.jpg

jhotrolled.jpg

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That rocks, John. Brings back the memories of my build.

 

You may know this but, when you get things braced and can really put it through it's paces, you put your hot steel into the rollers as far as you want and stomp the pedal down as far as it will go in one fast motion. That creates a step where you started and rolls the same thickness down the bar. When ready for another pass, tighten up the rollers to next thickness, slide hot bar in up to last step and stomp down on the pedal. You get a rythm going like that but only lasts maybe 3 draws in one heat. The rollers really suck the heat out. Part of my rythm is when the steel is back in the forge and I'm waiting to bring heat back up, I adjust the rollers and do any prep needed for another pass. I also keep several short peices of steel in various thicknesses at the mill so that I can stick them between the rollers (not running), with the pedal pushed all the way down, as gauges for final rolled thickness. More than once I got caught up in the whole process and rolled my final out too thin, oops!.

 

You'll quickly see what I meant before on the notched cog thingy for the handle. If you're just drawing down a bar to final thickness, it's easier to just reach down a give the star wheel a half turn or so to tighten up the rollers. The notched cog is fine if the steel's in the forge, but was more awkward than just turning the star wheel and having finish gauges to set final thickness.

 

Keep up the good work

 

Dan

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dan thanks for the info on the 'step' method.makes sense !!!! i will try it soon..........i need some braces and a spring which is a little stronger so i dont have to lift the pedal with my toes.

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John, your top roller bearings need a top plate to take the load off the bearing mounting bolts or they will move causing a miss alignment of the rolls. This will curse your knife blanks to curve.

Here’s a picture of a modification I had to make on my rolling mill.

 

Hope this helps.

 

. Dennis K

 

rolling_mill.jpg

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hydraulics seem fine to me for power. i am not sure speed control is important but i have a vfd on a 3 phase motor just in case i want to try it.

 

larger rolls will reduce the pressure on the material ( larger surface area in contact) and cool the material faster same reason.

 

from my limited experience and comments i have read slippage doesnt seem to be a problem........maybe it is for red hard materials.....

 

 

thanks for your thoughts

 

I just gave myself a dope slap. A larger diameter roller will decrease pressure and increase heat loss.

 

But I do still have a roller slippage problem when working red hard billets, the reasoning behind the idea of driving both rollers.

The speed controll would mainly be for insuring synchronizing roller speed.

 

I think the mods Dennis did to the bearing alignment are great. The machine I'm using has the same problem.

 

I really like your machine. The lines of the machine are so much cleaner with out all the belts and pulleys.

One thing you might want to do is add a ring around your acme thread adjusting fingers. I find the ring makes adjusting height easier.

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dennis.. thank for the tip.........i thought that piece of angle might be enough but i believe as you suggested it needs a full top plate

 

 

searobin.......... i like the ring idea.see what i can do

 

thanks john

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