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ROLLER MILL BUILD STARTING


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John, would you be interested in just selling a pair of rollers with bronze bearings and the bottom roller assembly?

 

top roller, bearings and grease fittings

 

bottom roller, bearings, shaft, grease fitting, and frame ???

 

note parts built to my print in inches slightly different from mcdonalds

Edited by john marcus

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top roller, bearings and grease fittings

 

bottom roller, bearings, shaft, grease fitting, and frame ???

 

note parts built to my print in inches slightly different from mcdonalds

 

Aye all of that. :) I understand, I'm not using his instructions.

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  • 3 weeks later...

top roller, bearings and grease fittings

 

bottom roller, bearings, shaft, grease fitting, and frame ???

 

note parts built to my print in inches slightly different from mcdonalds

 

John,

 

Please (anyone) correct me if I have the wrong impression. I have no problem working stock down to about 1/4" by hammer and it is pretty flat as well (LG50). I could only see using the rolls to flatten at that stage ( I do not like to use stops on my hammer, noise). The flattening would save a lot of grinding. I can also see an application where stock is forged down and given a final roll prior to welding. Am I way off the mark or are some of you actually rolling all the time?

Any way I will see you in person in Visalia to discus this some more. My current thought is if I had a roller which would start at 1/4" and reduce down to about 1/8" I would have what I need ( and it woud be easier to design, as one roller could drive the other via a set of gears ( sorry, I am always staring at those machines which roll a penny into an ellipse).

 

I am getting tempted to use my precious metal rolls on some iron to prove a point...but every time I look at those smooth surfaces I put it away.

Jan

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John,

 

Please (anyone) correct me if I have the wrong impression. I have no problem working stock down to about 1/4" by hammer and it is pretty flat as well (LG50). I could only see using the rolls to flatten at that stage ( I do not like to use stops on my hammer, noise). The flattening would save a lot of grinding. I can also see an application where stock is forged down and given a final roll prior to welding. Am I way off the mark or are some of you actually rolling all the time?

Any way I will see you in person in Visalia to discus this some more. My current thought is if I had a roller which would start at 1/4" and reduce down to about 1/8" I would have what I need ( and it woud be easier to design, as one roller could drive the other via a set of gears ( sorry, I am always staring at those machines which roll a penny into an ellipse).

 

I am getting tempted to use my precious metal rolls on some iron to prove a point...but every time I look at those smooth surfaces I put it away.

Jan

 

 

it seems to stretch almost 100% length wise, which for me is hard on the hammer..........also great for rolling damascus or san mai billets. distal tapers are also a nice touch with a roller..........

 

like all tools it is not the be all or end all but its nice to have when you need (want) it.

 

in the mcdonald design only one roller is driven :)

 

 

john

Edited by john marcus

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi John, if you get a chance would you be able to provide a couple of pointers as to how you got the bushing blocks for the drive roller to line up? I adjusted it so I can turn the roller by hand when the bushing blocks are pressed against the channel, but when I tighten the bolts all the way, the rollers clamp up. Any insight you could toss out there would be fantastic! Thanks!

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i could tell you what i did but i am not sure it matters at this point.

 

i think from what you described i would try something like this.

 

tighten only one side.does it bind ? .....shouldn't unless its pressing the other block into the channel....

 

for sake of discussion lets say it left the roller horizontal but pulled the other block away from the channel....use a few shims until the gap is filled .........

 

 

its more complicated if one or both sides are trying to take the roller out of horizontal.... if this is the case use undersized bolts to check it out keeping the roller horizontal while the smaller diameter bolts are tightened....if it works out you can file the channel holes to allow the same amount of adjustment so when the reg bolts are tightened the roller stays in position.

 

it can be a combination of both shims and level adjustments.

 

what i did on initial assembly was to bolt the roller in place and keep it free turning as i tacked welded and final welded the pieces together.

 

hope this helps if not let me know !!

Edited by john marcus

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Thanks John, it sure does help! I still haven't welded the frame together, I did a few tacks that can be cut if needed, which might be the case. I'll let you know how it turns out!

in that case bolt the roller tight.tack check adjust.. should be very close when you are finished...

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  • 3 weeks later...

Nice Michael, cannot wait to see the pictures!

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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  • 3 weeks later...

John, what is the diameter of the rollers and what is the diameter of the roller shaft. I just got a lathe so I'm going to be making my own.

 

Thanks!

-Dan

Edited by Dan Seaver
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John, what is the diameter of the rollers and what is the diameter of the roller shaft. I just got a lathe so I'm going to be making my own.

 

Thanks!

-Dan

 

 

top roll 2 inch diam with 1.25 diameter ends ( no separate shaft )

bottom roll 2 inch diam with 1 inch diam shaft

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  • 3 months later...

Hello John,

That was a beautifully documented build.

I am currently running a Matt Whitmas built mill that I love. 5"dia. rolls, 12"wide, 5hp hydraulics with forward/reverse.

But..

I'm working on a project (san-mai construction) that will require a stepped transition from bolster to distal tapered sword length blade.

I think the small rolls and closing/engagement system on the McDonald type mill would work well for this blade.

I got the impression from the thread that you might have complete mills or parts available for sale.

Is that still true?

Hank

henry knickmeyer

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John, would you be interested in just selling a pair of rollers with bronze bearings and the bottom roller assembly?

 

 

happy to....... let me see what i have in stock

 

what dimensions do you need / want or dont care ??

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John,

I'd be trying for an abrupt transition from bolster to blade so I think a small diameter roll would be best...2" or a little less. Width is less important, 3 or 4" would be enough, whatever we could get without deflection problems.

Hank

henry knickmeyer

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  • 1 month later...

happy to....... let me see what i have in stock

 

what dimensions do you need / want or dont care ??

 

I actually ended up turning my own rollers since I got a lathe at the beginning of winter. The rolling mill I'm building is based on Delbert Ealy's design. Your thread inspired me to do a WIP thread also, mine is waiting on funds though since cash is tight.

You can view it here if you would like to:

http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=686554

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  • 1 month later...

I got one of these mills from John a while back and have it up and running in my shop. Unfortunately I then had to replace the roof on the shop so I haven't had a chance to play with it.

The mill looks great and John was good to work with.

Thanks John,

Hank

henry knickmeyer

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I got one of these mills from John a while back and have it up and running in my shop. Unfortunately I then had to replace the roof on the shop so I haven't had a chance to play with it.

The mill looks great and John was good to work with.

Thanks John,

Hank

 

 

thanks !!!

infinite edge cutlery

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Mine is still going strong! Once you learn how to use one of these it really speeds up drawing steel. Also, it's a great final step on sword-length billets to assure uniform thickness.

 

--Dave

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Just a quick addendum to this thread.

The rolling mill that Dee is using in Ric Furrer's "Dee from Australia" thread is the one that John Marcus built for me a while back. It's a great tool.

Hank

 

John/Hank/Dee,

If you wish I will post the three videos I took of Dee using the mill.

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

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