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john marcus

ROLLER MILL BUILD STARTING

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I must say that I watched Dee using Hank's mill and she impressed me enough with how well it worked that it's the next thing on my "really don't need but just got to have" list.

Now where do I get one?

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John/Hank/Dee,

If you wish I will post the three videos I took of Dee using the mill.

 

Ric

 

 

yes please if its ok with dee

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I must say that I watched Dee using Hank's mill and she impressed me enough with how well it worked that it's the next thing on my "really don't need but just got to have" list.

Now where do I get one?

 

 

John,

I must say Dee's work at that roller made an impression me as well. I am going to have a lot of "antique" Wootz coming down the pipe soon and rolling the last 1/4" of thickness may be the best way to go. The problem is, I work his material at a low temperature at about 800C near the end of the forging process. At this temperature this stuff is pretty tough ( much like forging cold steel).

I have seen youtube videos where a roller was being challenged by too thick , too wide and probably too cold a material.....alll my material will be about 1.5" wide and about 5/16 thick...I need to go down to about 5/32.

Would you test a sample ( just above critical temperature) to see if it will be a viable way to go.....why ...if you show up in Burlingame or Visalia ( in your PU truck, it would never have to touch the ground. If this is not possible I will contact another "local" and see if he will test it.

Thanks

Jan

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John,

I must say Dee's work at that roller made an impression me as well. I am going to have a lot of "antique" Wootz coming down the pipe soon and rolling the last 1/4" of thickness may be the best way to go. The problem is, I work his material at a low temperature at about 800C near the end of the forging process. At this temperature this stuff is pretty tough ( much like forging cold steel).

I have seen youtube videos where a roller was being challenged by too thick , too wide and probably too cold a material.....alll my material will be about 1.5" wide and about 5/16 thick...I need to go down to about 5/32.

Would you test a sample ( just above critical temperature) to see if it will be a viable way to go.....why ...if you show up in Burlingame or Visalia ( in your PU truck, it would never have to touch the ground. If this is not possible I will contact another "local" and see if he will test it.

Thanks

Jan

 

 

no problem but its at least a month away........ i stole some parts from my roller for a customer and we have started to build four more complete units.... once i have one i would be happy to try it out.

 

john

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I have one of John's mills. I use it on every billet of damascus. It works really well, but I work the steel HOT. Near welding temp.

 

When drawing out steel, you get a sort of bubble or bulge in front of the roller after you stomp down on the foot pedal. This only seems to form when the steel is yellow or higher heat.

 

You can draw steel at lower temps, but it goes slowly. The dramatic, fast draws only come from high temp welds in my experience. I can draw steel out at least 3x faster on the mill than on the press (even using the drawing die) as long as I keep the steel really hot.

 

One neat aspect is that the steel doesn't cool down nearly as quickly on the mill vs. the press. The press dies suck up the heat of the billet quickly. Since the mill only has a small part touching the steel at any given time, the heat exchange is much smaller.

 

Others may have different experiences or techniques.

 

Dave

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I have one of John's mills. I use it on every billet of damascus. It works really well, but I work the steel HOT. Near welding temp.

When drawing out steel, you get a sort of bubble or bulge in front of the roller after you stomp down on the foot pedal. This only seems to form when the steel is yellow or higher heat.

You can draw steel at lower temps, but it goes slowly. The dramatic, fast draws only come from high temp welds in my experience. I can draw steel out at least 3x faster on the mill than on the press (even using the drawing die) as long as I keep the steel really hot.

One neat aspect is that the steel doesn't cool down nearly as quickly on the mill vs. the press. The press dies suck up the heat of the billet quickly. Since the mill only has a small part touching the steel at any given time, the heat exchange is much smaller.

Others may have different experiences or techniques.

Dave

 

Dave,

Thanks. I am not trying to do this last bit of reduction fast, but I would like to do it above critical and most importantly do it quietly. Working with relatively narrow sections I hope it will work..and leave me with little grinding to do. My assumption is wootz should not be worked at too low atemperature...to high a temperature and the cementite will show up in ohter forms ( meaning I would have to heat cycle all over again).

 

Jan

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Hi John. I've been reading this thread also. It's great the way you did a WIP during the construction of the mill.

Thanks for letting us ride with you on this venture, it was a lot of fun to read, even through I'm just now seeing it for the first time.

Robert Hensarling

Uvalde, texas

Edited by rhrocker

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just wondering about how essential, the basic hammer drawing principles, are when compared to the option of building one of these first. thanks.

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hey John, do you still have any McDonald mills for sale or are you thinking of building more in the future ?

I'd like to buy one, but haven't seen any for sale anywhere.

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