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where do you buy perlite?


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can you get it at home depot or walmart? also does it make a good high-temp aggregate? i was going to experiment with different mixtures to use as a refractory. thanks.

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I know I've seen it at our local Lowe's and I think the Home Depot has it. I don't know about Walmart.

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Perlite isn't as heat resistant as you'd like, and it may tend to flux the surrouding matrix. Likely OK at general forging temps, may start to cause problems at forge welding temps.

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Easily found on the Internet? Sure. But if you mean easily found at your local hardware store, not that I'm familiar with. A lot depends how much you want to spend, and how often you're willing to make repairs.

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Make a hotface of some kind of high temp commercial refractory, say 1/2" thick. (If you really want to get primitive you could go with a mix of kaolin or ball clay plus clean silica sand, but I don't recommend it. It's much more complicated.) Back your that with your perlite mixture. The hotface should absorb the worst of the punishment and protect your perlite some.

 

A ceramic supply store can sell you the kaolin or ball clay, or at least order it for you.

 

By the way, I've played with homemade refractories enough to know that I don't ever want to play with them again. The commercial stuff works right the first time, no experimentation required, and it's a lot easier to deal with.

Edited by Matt Bower
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can you get it at home depot or walmart? also does it make a good high-temp aggregate? i was going to experiment with different mixtures to use as a refractory. thanks.

 

 

Clint,

The hot face suggestion is a good idea. A 50/50 mix of grog and fire clay will work well for anything we see on these pages. You can use it as a ramming mix and then back it up with an insulating material like Perlite . You may want to check at your local feed store for a similar material called Dry-Stall ( a little less expensive) , I have used it as an insulating backing and it works well ( it does shrink a little when hot, and do not breath the dust from any of this stuff) .

 

Jan

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