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Where to buy copper/niobium superconductor?


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I've seen a number of makers using this material, but I've no idea where they get it from. Anyone out there have a source?

 

-Jim

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There are two purposes. #1. to satisfy my lust for interesting raw material. #2. to make interesting blade fittings. (I've no idea if one could make a habaki out of it, but I bet it would be really interesting to try!)

 

-Jim

 

 

For what purpose?
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I've seen a number of makers using this material, but I've no idea where they get it from. Anyone out there have a source?

 

-Jim

Jim contact Gary Runyon 256-722-2231 He is the only source for this stock, and the supply is limited.

Chuck

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Thank you, Chuck. You're a Scholar and a Gentleman!

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"niobium superconductor??"

 

Sounds like something a comic book villian would use to stop Spiderman or something.

 

That goes in the same bucket as the "Cyclonic Percipitator" from the dust collection thread.

 

Grins,

 

Dave

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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see http://www.wahchang.com/pages/outlook/html...ssues/15_03.htm a start.........

 

 

or Here is a Thomas Register listing of MFRs which may be of help to you in purchasing Type-II Superconductors which exhibit the 'flux pinning' effect:

(note: C = coatings or film, M = materials or components, W = wire)

 

Advanced Ceramics Inc., NJ, M, 609-397-2900, 609-397-2708

Alfa Aesar Johnson Matthes, MA, M, 800-343-0660, 508-521-6350

All-Chemie LTD, SC, M, 803-884-4400, 803-884-0560

Alloys International Inc., NY, W, 516-342-0043, 516-342-0051

Angstrom Sciences, PA, M, 412-462-2777, 412-462-2780

California Fine Wire Co., CA, W, 805-489-5144, 805-489-5352

Commercial Crystal Labs Inc., FL, M, 914-643-5959, 914-643-6058

ESDI Inc., NY, C, 516-563-8278, 516-563-8231

G & J Steel & Tubing Inc., NJ, W, 800-322-8823, 908-526-9487

G&S Titanium, OH, W, 800-860-0564, 330-262-1550

GE Co., CT, M, 800-626-2004

Grove Grundilling Inc., ME, W, 207-743-7051, 207-743-7083

Hitachi Cable America, NY, M, 800-394-0234, 914-993-0990

HITC Superconductors Inc., NJ, M, 609-397-2700, 609-397-2708

Hypres Inc., NY, M, 914-592-1190, 914-347-2239

IGC Advanced Superconductors Inc., CT, W, 203-753-5215, 203-753-2096

Innovare Inc., PA, M, 610-837-8830

Intermagnetics General Corp., NY, M, 518-786-1122

InterWire Group, NY, W, 800-799-4978, 914-273-6510

MolecuWire Corp., NJ, W, 908-938-9473, 908-938-3189

Omega Engiuneering Inc., CT, W, 800-826-6342, 203-359-7700

Oxford Superconducting Technology, NJ, W, 908-541-1300, 908-541-7769

Rea Engineeered Wire Products Inc., IN, W, 219-422-4252, 219-422-4246

SAES Getters USA Inc., CO, M, 719-576-3200, 719-576-5025

Satcon Technology Corp., MA, M, 800-663-4916, 617-661-3373

SonoTec Corp., NY, C, 917-795-2020, 914-795-2720

Superconductive Componenets, OH, M, 800-346-6567, 800-292-8654

Superconductor Tech Inc., CA, M, 805-683-8527, 805-683-8527

Superconix Inc., MN, M, 612-222-0046, 612-222-0049

Vacuumschmelze (Siemens), NJ, M, 908-494-3530, 908-603-5994

Watteredge Uniflex Inc., OH, W, 216-871-9215, 216-933-8248

Edited by john marcus

infinite edge cutlery

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see http://www.wahchang.com/pages/outlook/html...ssues/15_03.htm a start.........

 

 

or Here is a Thomas Register listing of MFRs which may be of help to you in purchasing Type-II Superconductors which exhibit the 'flux pinning' effect:

(note: C = coatings or film, M = materials or components, W = wire)

 

Advanced Ceramics Inc., NJ, M, 609-397-2900, 609-397-2708

Alfa Aesar Johnson Matthes, MA, M, 800-343-0660, 508-521-6350

All-Chemie LTD, SC, M, 803-884-4400, 803-884-0560

Alloys International Inc., NY, W, 516-342-0043, 516-342-0051

Angstrom Sciences, PA, M, 412-462-2777, 412-462-2780

California Fine Wire Co., CA, W, 805-489-5144, 805-489-5352

Commercial Crystal Labs Inc., FL, M, 914-643-5959, 914-643-6058

ESDI Inc., NY, C, 516-563-8278, 516-563-8231

G & J Steel & Tubing Inc., NJ, W, 800-322-8823, 908-526-9487

G&S Titanium, OH, W, 800-860-0564, 330-262-1550

GE Co., CT, M, 800-626-2004

Grove Grundilling Inc., ME, W, 207-743-7051, 207-743-7083

Hitachi Cable America, NY, M, 800-394-0234, 914-993-0990

HITC Superconductors Inc., NJ, M, 609-397-2700, 609-397-2708

Hypres Inc., NY, M, 914-592-1190, 914-347-2239

IGC Advanced Superconductors Inc., CT, W, 203-753-5215, 203-753-2096

Innovare Inc., PA, M, 610-837-8830

Intermagnetics General Corp., NY, M, 518-786-1122

InterWire Group, NY, W, 800-799-4978, 914-273-6510

MolecuWire Corp., NJ, W, 908-938-9473, 908-938-3189

Omega Engiuneering Inc., CT, W, 800-826-6342, 203-359-7700

Oxford Superconducting Technology, NJ, W, 908-541-1300, 908-541-7769

Rea Engineeered Wire Products Inc., IN, W, 219-422-4252, 219-422-4246

SAES Getters USA Inc., CO, M, 719-576-3200, 719-576-5025

Satcon Technology Corp., MA, M, 800-663-4916, 617-661-3373

SonoTec Corp., NY, C, 917-795-2020, 914-795-2720

Superconductive Componenets, OH, M, 800-346-6567, 800-292-8654

Superconductor Tech Inc., CA, M, 805-683-8527, 805-683-8527

Superconix Inc., MN, M, 612-222-0046, 612-222-0049

Vacuumschmelze (Siemens), NJ, M, 908-494-3530, 908-603-5994

Watteredge Uniflex Inc., OH, W, 216-871-9215, 216-933-8248

 

John. I think the stock Jim is looking for, is what is left from the sample runs of the main conductor of the Super Collider project that was started in Texas years ago. The project was scrapped due to budget cuts. Gary worked for the company that made the conductor samples and was able to buy them as scrap, years later.

I suspect that the cost of having one of these companies duplicate the material Gary sells might induce cardiac arrest.

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Yup,

Chuck is right, Gary Runyon is the sole source, and spends a lot of time (and $$$) to have it cut with a wire EDM. Very cool material and can take a beautiful finish in a rainbow of colors. As was mentioned, to recreate this material would cost enormous amounts of money so we are lucky that Gary has seen fit to make it avialable to us all ... and at a price in line with "plain" mokume!!!

 

Dan

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The annealed alloy Cu99.5Nb0.5 shows zero resistance at a current density of 200 A cm–2 below 3K

 

from http://www.springerlink.com/content/q5657j4387x54084/

 

Really interesting.

Its 99.5+% copper. Probably easily worked. Niobium by itself has a pretty high melting point. I think it should solder just like copper.

don't quote me on that.

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I have copper buss bars that have a coating to them (chrome plating) this is what I am making my habaki out of minus the plating.

A soft answer turneth away wrath: The tongue of the wise useth knowledge aright: but the mouth of fools poureth out foolishness.

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  • 2 years later...

John. I think the stock Jim is looking for, is what is left from the sample runs of the main conductor of the Super Collider project that was started in Texas years ago. The project was scrapped due to budget cuts. Gary worked for the company that made the conductor samples and was able to buy them as scrap, years later.

I suspect that the cost of having one of these companies duplicate the material Gary sells might induce cardiac arrest.

 

 

I have to debunk this myth that this copper/ niobium titanium material is rare. There is any where between $40k to $120K worth of it in every MRI machine on earth. Hardly rare, it is still expensive. However, there is no need to have a company "duplicate" this material, they readily manufacture miles of it per year... There are a good number of companies that all they do is crank out this stuff all day long. One company makes enough of it in a year to satisfy the entire custom knife market thousands of times over.

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I have to debunk this myth that this copper/ niobium titanium material is rare. There is any where between $40k to $120K worth of it in every MRI machine on earth. Hardly rare, it is still expensive. However, there is no need to have a company "duplicate" this material, they readily manufacture miles of it per year... There are a good number of companies that all they do is crank out this stuff all day long. One company makes enough of it in a year to satisfy the entire custom knife market thousands of times over.

 

Could you cite any of the manufacturers? It would be good to know who to try and bother to purchase offcuts and scraps :)

 

Thanks,

 

-d

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  • 1 month later...

I actually just found some of this stuff on ebay, thought I would report back. The seller has no feedback, I have emailed him with questions, so we will see whats up. The price on the piece he is selling seems pretty good considering this is a very large piece.

 

superconductor on ebay

Edited by DC Purvis
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Weighing in. Having seen the raw stock that Gary had at Batson's several years ago the piece showed on ebay looks to have been smaller in diameter and possibly pressed. The pattern distortion around the edges isn't characteristic of the material to be drawn to wire as it would be consistent in size, shape, and distribution since no matter how small you draw it the cross section is always the same, if it's done right. If I recall the plans for the Texas SCSC would have called for the resulting wire to be in the range of fewer than 100 microns diameter but maintaining the original pattern, etc. None the less it's difficult to work with and pretty cool too.

My two bits worth

Denis

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Just heard back from the seller, seems like a nice chap. I asked if it had been pressed or altered since toward the edges the circles get larger. He said this is a cross section of a round bar that is used in the manufacture of MRI machines. There is supposed to be larger filaments on the outer diameter as this was the spec for what ever model scanner it is supposed to be used in apparently. You can see there are two different sizes, I think it looks pretty cool. Anyways it's about to end , I wish I has found this sooner so I could have found funds . Oh well.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I don't have that alloy but I do have some niobium/tantalum superconducting alloy. It's 92.5% Nb, 7.5% Ta. It works pretty much like regular niobium but the anodizing range is four or five volts higher for each target color.

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