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Grant, what happens if coils touch?

 

 

it the coils short(touch) in one place it is the same as removing one coil....... less power transferred to the work and changes the load on the heater

Edited by john marcus

infinite edge cutlery

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Thanks Grant...

Look for a package heading your way ... went out this morning :D

 

Well after 3 test runs... all sort of o.k.... :wacko: water flowed through... :P I finally got the hang of it... very cool...

 

Now I just need to form the coil... ran out of time...

 

I have a quick question about annealing copper...

 

Does it anneal just as well when you quench it in water as just leaving it to air cool?

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I think quenching is needed.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Quenching makes no difference in pure copper. It is just a convenience that lets you get back to work faster. The softening occurs at temps above 350F the more heat you put in the faster it gets soft. So making it glow and allowing to cool any way you see fit gets you to dead soft really fast. Copper can be annealed at lower temps if you increase the time factor.

 

The confusion comes from...

The quenching of metals like Sterling silver and some gold alloys being required to get to dead soft. There is a window in the cooling cycle where the mid range temps on the cooling cycle promote the growth of precipitates. If allowed to grow these re-harden the alloy to some extent. Quenching from black heat keeps time spent in this window to a minimum and yields a softer material than air cooling alone.

 

patrick :ph34r:

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You're right, it doesn't make a lot of difference in the softness. I do find that water quenching gives a much finer grain though. Any time spent above recrystallization temperature causes grain growth and the coarser grain does seem to fracture easier. But yeah, it mostly allows you to get back at it without burning your fingers.

[font="Book Antiqua"][color="#0000FF"][size="5"][b]Perfection[/b][/size]

[i][size="3"]is achieved not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.[/size][/i][/color][/font]

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If your copper is getting brittle something is not quite right...

Just a quick torch heat to a dull red and an air cool is all that is needed. I have never seen any copper get brittle from this. I have work with copper frequently everyday for the last 13 years.

 

patrick :ph34r:

 

Edited to add, I usually anneal in a well lit room. With the lights off its more of a low orange.

Edited by Patrick Hastings
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Thanks for all the replies...

I learn so much here with all the backgrounds and experiences...

I really appreciate the time people take here to explain things to a otherwise uniformed person like me...

Hope to return the favor someday...

Mucho Mahalo's :D

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I didn't say "brittle". Hammering breaks up the large grain, but I find where I'm twisting or bending the finer grain seems less fracture prone.

 

"Mucho Mahalo's" What's that, Spanish/Hawaiian?

Edited by nakedanvil

[font="Book Antiqua"][color="#0000FF"][size="5"][b]Perfection[/b][/size]

[i][size="3"]is achieved not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.[/size][/i][/color][/font]

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I didn't say "brittle". Hammering breaks up the large grain, but I find where I'm twisting or bending the finer grain seems less fracture prone.

 

"Mucho Mahalo's" What's that, Spanish/Hawaiian?

 

Yuppers.... Spanish Hawaiian :lol:

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I didn't say "brittle". Hammering breaks up the large grain, but I find where I'm twisting or bending the finer grain seems less fracture prone.

 

"Mucho Mahalo's" What's that, Spanish/Hawaiian?

 

For some reason I thought I read brittle in there. My mistake. Need more sleep.

patrick :ph34r:

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Well I made the flat coil and I still have water flowing through it :rolleyes:

Was worried I might have blocked it on that double 90 degree bend... :wacko:

Just need to solder the 1/4 copper tubing to it, flare and hook it up...

Any last minute things I need to know before I power this "puppy" up?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Went fishing last weekend so didn't get these up .... (didn't catch anything but it sure was a nice day!)

Here's the results of my first flat coil... used 1/8 and 3/16 stock...

Strong magnetic field in the center of the coil... really pushed the bar down...

I'll post the video on my youtube and you'll see the 1/8 move when I turn the machine on...

Cool stuff...

Flat Coil 1.JPG

Flat Coil 2.JPG

Flat Coil 3.JPG

Flat Coil 4.JPG

Flat Coil 5.JPG

Flat Coil 6.JPG

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Craig, as you can see, the outside edge wants to to heat faster. You now need to learn a little bit about "tuning" the coil for the work. To get a more even heating out of it you need to now depress the center of the coil turning it into a slightly conical shape. This not only puts the center part closer, it changes the shape of the magnetic field. In most uses, you'll want a more even heat. Might need to turn the heat down too, so it'll take 20 seconds instead of ten. Power is cool, but control is more important. Keep playing! Have fun (looks like you are).

 

Mega Mambo Mahalo's, Grant

 

obtw: thanks for the re-load on coffee and mac nuts!

Edited by nakedanvil

[font="Book Antiqua"][color="#0000FF"][size="5"][b]Perfection[/b][/size]

[i][size="3"]is achieved not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.[/size][/i][/color][/font]

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Thanks guys for the pictures and tips. Never thought it could be so versatile. If Tom Ferry checks back in, maybe he might comment on heat treat limitations.

 

Interesting stuff, Craig

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  • 1 year later...

You'll notice with the pancake coil that it heats at the outside better. This can be improved a little by pushing it into a little bit of a cone shape.

[font="Book Antiqua"][color="#0000FF"][size="5"][b]Perfection[/b][/size]

[i][size="3"]is achieved not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.[/size][/i][/color][/font]

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