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Not Satisfied with Hamon


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I have no problem (well there are always problems )with getting the hamon in the steel that I want but have not been satisfied with my process of "showing it off". I don't have a good method of giving the high contrast of dark & light that I would like. How do most of you finish a clay tempered blade?

 

Gary

Edited by Gary Mulkey

Gary

 

ABS,CKCA,ABKA,KGA

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Gary

 

For starters I polish up to the 1000 grit and then start doing light dips into Ferric, and then removing the oxides with Rubbing Compound then rubbing ultra fine pumice, then do this all over again with the next grit until I reach 3000 grit and by then the hamon is very defined and the soft steel is darker.

 

Now as other will post to this thread keep in mind that not all methods work for everyone so pick and experiment

John W Smith
www.smith-forge.org

Fire and wind come from the sky, from the gods of the sky. But Crom is your god, Crom and he lives in the earth. Once, giants lived in the Earth, Conan. And in the darkness of chaos, they fooled Crom, and they took from him the enigma of steel. Crom was angered. And the Earth shook. Fire and wind struck down these giants, and they threw their bodies into the waters, but in their rage, the gods forgot the secret of steel and left it on the battlefield. We who found it are just men. Not gods. Not giants. Just men. The secret of steel has always carried with it a mystery. You must learn its riddle, Conan. You must learn its discipline. For no one - no one in this world can you trust. Not men, not women, not beasts.

[Points to sword]

This you can trust

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Hi Gary,

 

My approach is a mix of East and West. I use EDM stones up to #900US, then wet/dry at #1000US. Then I polish with a thick piece of hazuya with only baking soda water for lube--clouds-up the softer body, mirror polishes the hardened areas. After that, I etch in either ferric or lemon/lime juice. (My ferric is at 2:13 ferric:distilled H2O, but that seems too "potent" at this point. I suggest 1:3 down to 1:5 ferric:distilled H2O). Oxides are then cleaned with Flitz (or similar: SimiChrome, Noxon, etc.) and paper towel.

 

After degreasing that with denatured alcohol, I polish the whole blade with the same (now thinner piece of) hazuya, using a "lube" of baking soda water and hazuya-on-hazuya rubbings. (If you work a piece of wetted hazuya on another piece of it, you will get a gray-white paste, more commonly called "tojiru"). The body is then worked with Shin-Jizuya, which darkens and mirrorizes the body. I usually have to go over the hardened areas again with hazuya + tojiru to keep them milky white.

 

[Edited for clarity]

For Western blades (as well as Japanese-style blades), John gives a pretty solid approach. John and others use that method to great effect on Japanese-style blades. I too have polished to #1000US, etched in ferric, then polished with Flitz, followed by pumice in baking soda water. (The baking soda is critical; it prevents rust, which will happen before your eyes even with distilled water). This seems to be a life-long quest of experimentation. I also strongly recomend Walter Sorrell's hybrid polishing DVD, worth its weight in platinum...

 

Thanks,

Edited by RedNeckLeftie

Brian K.

Rogue Amateur and Weekend Hobbyist

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I have tried quite a few things ,many mentioned above .

flitz is an amazing product .

Remember that cameras lie in the case of a good Hamon photo ,In real life hamon are a lot more subtle and elusive .

forging soul in to steel

 

owenbush.co.uk

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I make a slurry of baking soda and very fine powdered polishing stone. I polish up to about 1500, degrease with denatured alcohol, etch in 1:5 ferric solution if necessary. I use the slurry to clean the oxides off the hamon and brighten it until I am satisfied with the shape and detail. I clean the rest of the oxides off slowly with baking soda and cloth in water.

 

I made some nugui-like substance which I've been trying out. I mixed iron oxide and lamp black ground into a really really really fine powder. It has to be really fine because scale will scratch the crap out of anything. This I mixed with seed or mineral oil and filtered through cloth to get the large particles out.

There are many kinds of nugui for different types of finishes. I'm still learning about this. They are not cheap to buy.

 

Niko: Where do you get your Nugui? do you use the different types?

Edited by toxonix
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I made own nugui from Iron-Oxide (Fe3O4 magnetite) also from 50-50 graphite and Fe3O4

Pottery oxide is fine powder and it dosent scratch steel.

Lubricant is oil in both..Some oils make "skin" if they are in open air!

Low viscosity is ok...baby oil,clove oil.

 

Soft piece of cotton and flod it and between them nugui...it says better this way trapped in cotton.

It needs guite a lot preasure to get it dark....but if you do it too much...steel turns brown..and you need to

take step back....and re done.

 

AND it not bad to use GOOD safety cloves ( anti cut.. kevlar/wire)

 

BR

Niko

 

 

Edit:

 

Ahh...I did make one test whit Fe2O3 hematite...but I just cant remember how it worked.

Edited by Niko Hynninen
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In re-reading my earlier post, I noticed it could use some re-wording, so it's been edited. Small change, better conveyance.

 

Niko,

 

Thanks for the nugui tips, I think when I tried it, I did not use enough pressure to get a good effect. I'm guessing you learned to use gloves the hard way--like me? :o

 

Thanks,

Brian K.

Rogue Amateur and Weekend Hobbyist

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