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Is this a hamon?


SAD

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MJD is forging this for my Birthday and I was wanting to ask some more experienced smiths if this really is a hamon. Matthew says it is, but I'm not sure. It's from a piece of leaf spring so it's probably NOT 10XX steel. Please tell me what we have here.

isthis1.JPG

isthis2.JPG

“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquillity of servitude than the animating contest of freedom, — go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen!”

a better man than me first said that, but I say it today.

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could be 10xx, depending on the age and make, there are no hard and fast rules - i've had leaf spring take a great hamon, but other springs won't even differentially harden. as to whether this is what you have here, it's hard to say at this level of polish - did he use clay? i take it the side with the pitting is the spine, and the tip is to the left of the pics? if you could post a pic of the whole blade it may help...

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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oh, and here's the whole thing if anyone is interested. There will be more cleanup before mounting the mahogany scales. We got side tracked when we saw what might be the merest hint of a hamon.

SADblade.JPG

Edited by SAD

“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquillity of servitude than the animating contest of freedom, — go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen!”

a better man than me first said that, but I say it today.

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It looks like a differential-hardening line. Would take a higher level of polish to determine if it is hamon or not. Hamon are not happy accidents. They are not merely differential hardening lines. They are not things we hope might show up. They are pre-determined, pre-planned treatments done to the blade. Did he prepare the blade and treat it as such that it should have a hamon should all the conditions have gone correctly? If so, he may have a hamon or merely hardening line if it did not have hataraki added. Even Soshu blades have ashi and hataraki that aren't evident in the polished habuchi, but they are put there puposefully and via the skill of the smith. I would say it warrants a better polish to see what turns up. Of course, just my humble opinions.

 

Shannon

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Now admittedly I don't have the best vision in the world but it looks like to me the activity I'm seeing in the blade looks like severe decarb around the area that looks heavily pitted due to substantial overheating. I could be pretty far off but I think it's a very highly defined decarb line. The blade looks neat though either way.

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Decarb line makes the most sense. However, the pitting is from original stock. Matthew likes working from that point to get the "look". This is an OLD leaf spring and he did not clean it up before he began forging. no differential hardening, no clay.

 

"Hamon are not happy accidents"

 

Decarb must be it, hadn't considered the possibility.

Thanks all for your input. It's a cool blade either way. Can't wait till he fits the scales. Gonna use this one all the time!

“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquillity of servitude than the animating contest of freedom, — go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen!”

a better man than me first said that, but I say it today.

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