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Trying out new stuff


Dave Stephens

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Happy Saturday Everyone:

 

Here's one I made in order to learn some stuff.

 

I've played with a bit of carving, but needed a lot more practice (still do!). So I decided to challenge myself and try to carve a face of some kind with the caveat that it still had to form a comfortable handle for a knife.

 

I have also not really played with getting a hamon beside for one failed attempt with O1 a long while ago.

 

Finally, I hadn't done many integrals, and those I had built were a bit of a disappointment.

 

So . . . why not try all three in one blade, right? :blink: I ordered some satanite, some round stock and pulled a chunk of ebony out of the materials drawer.

 

Attatched is the result.

 

It is made from the W1 round stock that Deker was selling earlier. That stuff is nice to work with. Thanks Deker.

 

Lots of lessons learned on this one. A big one was the placement of the satanite clay. I thought I was putting it on really ragged to create an active, interestin hamon. Instead, I got this smooth line. I guess I really need to make the clay placement dramatic next time.

 

The hamon popped very easily, however. Just one quick dip in the FC.

 

I believe my next project will be an intergral damascus blade of some kind.

 

Cheers!

 

--Dave

 

overview.jpg

 

upright.jpg

 

back.jpg

 

handle.jpg

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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That is really cool! How did you shape the back of the bolster where it meets the handle? Great work!

 

Thanks Steve.

 

I formed the back of the bolster by drawing out the tang as you normally would, then I used an abrasive wheel cutoff saw to make cuts that created the "shoulders" with sharp angles. Finally, I locked the tang in my drill press and turned it on its slowest setting and put a bastard file on the back of the bolster. It flattened it out and made everything even.

 

Of course, I make it sound really easy now. What I just described was the method that worked well. I left off all the methods I tried which didn't work worth a damn! :D

 

Cheers!

 

--Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Well just look at you go...There is no better way than getting out of your comfort zone to push your skills forward. Incorprating several challenges into one project was IMHO, an extremely intellegent decision. And as to the carving...bet you didn't know you had it it inya. Way to go Dave

; your stuff is improving with every piece you finish.

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Thanks JD. That means a lot.

 

Carving is something I want to learn so I can transition to lost wax casting of bronze. I figure I ought to master wood carving first.

 

Then it's on to wire inlay, engraving, scrimshaw, folders, mosaic damascus, stainless damascus, mokume, setting stones in bezels, etc. etc. etc. (that'll only take another 20 year or so I estimate . .)

 

The cool thing about this craft is you never run out of the next thing to learn . . .

 

Cheers!

 

--Dave

Edited by Dave Stephens

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Thanks JD. That means a lot.

 

Carving is something I want to learn so I can transition to lost wax casting of bronze. I figure I ought to master wood carving first.

 

Then it's on to wire inlay, engraving, scrimshaw, folders, mosaic damascus, stainless damascus, mokume, setting stones in bezels, etc. etc. etc. (that'll only take another 20 year or so I estimate . .)

 

The cool thing about this craft is you never run out of the next thing to learn . . .

 

Cheers!

 

--Dave

You said it. That list of skill sets you just named...got em' all...after 27 years at this!!! And there's still more I want to try; so muich to master, so little time!!

Edited by jdsmith02115
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I am really impressed. the face reminds me of an "Ent". Also, no matter how you turn the knife, there seems to be a face with a camera looking back at you.

 

Seriouly, nice work . What size stock did you start with, and did you have to do any upsetting or just forge and file the step?

 

Carving opens up an entire world of possibility, doesn't it! You are really different skills together in interesting ways. Keep at it, and keep sharing the process with us.

 

Kevin

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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very awesome dave, thats impressive for a go at it, and in a very dense wood too. Looks great, I love it.

Gnáthamh na hoibre an t-eólas

(Knowledge comes through practice)

 

Iron is full of impurities that weaken it; through the forging fire, it becomes steel and is transformed into a razor-sharp sword. Human beings develop in the same fashion. - Morihei Ueshiba

 

my site: http://lfcforgeworks.webs.com/

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That's got personality any way you look at it. The copper is a nice touch. Very cool.

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

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That is bloody awesome Dave... :)

 

It has excellent flow and overall shape. & definitely love the carving!

I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness,

nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend"

J.R.R. Tolkien

 

 

www.CedarloreForge.com

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Guest hawk_shaman

Very nicely done. I love the thought of turning a functional piece into a work of art as well. This forum never fails to inspire.

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What size stock did you start with, and did you have to do any upsetting or just forge and file the step?

 

I started with 1" round stock, so I didn't do any upsetting. I just squished the round stock down into a flat bar in the front of the bolster, and squished the tang from the round stock behind the bolster.

 

"Squished" by the way, is an ancient Mesopotamian term meaning "To use a 24 ton hydraulic press to flatten red hot steel."

 

Grins,

 

--Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Cool Dave,

you are fearless ..... well maybe not fearless cause of you fishing background.... but you are not afraid to take on new stuff!! Good for you... are you making a sheath? The drill press turning method makes me shudder.... I think you need a lathe.... but you already know that....

Dick

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I really like this knife.. you accomplished your goals, you learn a lot im sure.. and the hamon is nice.. and to be honest i think the subtle hamon looks great with the carved handle.. a flashy hamon may of over power the carving? instead, they both (blade,handle) compliment each other with the bolster to tie it together!! as a whole , well i love it. :)

 

chris.

i could complain but who would listen.

 

chris.

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The drill press turning method makes me shudder.... I think you need a lathe.... but you already know that....

Dick

 

Dick,

 

You know, now that you mention this I probably should have said that I had a 1/2" thick lexan shield set up (an old window from a boat) in case of flying blades.

 

Yeah, not a recommended technique.

 

Lathe/Mill combo is one of those tools on "to buy someday" list for sure.

 

--Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Thanks for all the kind words guys! I appreciate it.

 

--Dave

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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I am so "not worthy" to even comment on this blade. The WOW factor is high. I just barely understand enough to know what goes into a knife like this. This knowledge is humbling. I hope one day to approach skills like this. Right now I merely hope for a blade that cuts without bending or breaking and a handle that won't rattle or chafe. This knife represents mastery of multiple disciplines. I can imagine a knife like this being prized in any age.

“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquillity of servitude than the animating contest of freedom, — go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen!”

a better man than me first said that, but I say it today.

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I am so "not worthy" to even comment on this blade. The WOW factor is high. I just barely understand enough to know what goes into a knife like this. This knowledge is humbling. I hope one day to approach skills like this. Right now I merely hope for a blade that cuts without bending or breaking and a handle that won't rattle or chafe. This knife represents mastery of multiple disciplines. I can imagine a knife like this being prized in any age.

 

Thanks bud. I appreciate the compliments, but this is really a learning knife, not representing "mastery" in any sense of the word.

 

Take a look at some of the real master's work we have here on the forum (start with our host, Don Fogg, then take a look at Jake Powning, J.D. Smith, Uli Hennrick, Jim Hrisolous, I could go on here . . .) and you'll see the difference. As you grow as a craftsman, your "eye" for this sort of thing will become more discerning.

 

In terms of accomplishing your goal of building a good, solid starter knife, I recommend getting a couple of books. David Boye's Step-by-Step Knifemaking is a great one to start with. Wayne Goddard's $50 Knife Shop is also a good one if you're on a budget. And, The Complete Bladesmith by Jim Hrisolous is a must if you want to learn to forge and not just do stock removal. I've owned these books for many years, read them so many times the pages are all bent and stained with coffee rings, and I'm still learning from them.

 

Luck!

 

-Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Dave,

You must be a very humble person. I see the overall piece after the fact,(mirror polish, balanced lines, detailed integral bolster, carved copper accent, close tolerances at all joints, HAMON!) so the impression is of one who knows what he is doing even if this project represented a leap forward for the maker. Seriously, thanks for the encouragement and patient words. I've only been at this for a couple of years now and don't even get to forge at all some months. Gentlemen such as yourself and the names on the list you mentioned(yes, all truly superb craftsmen) take time to guide, encourage, and teach. This forum is a blessing beyond description.

My son(MJDforge, 13, of whom I am proud) just acquired a copy of the $50 knife shop. Mr. Goddard is indeed a great teacher.

 

If this is a "learning knife" :blink: then I can't wait to see what you consider mastery B) !

“If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquillity of servitude than the animating contest of freedom, — go from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains sit lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen!”

a better man than me first said that, but I say it today.

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