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Type Y Viking Sword


Michael Pikula
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That is very nice indeed.

 

I don't suppose you could be talked into posting a tutorial on how you achieved the fuller?

 

I've only made one Viking blade, and the fuller was a real challenge. I'm interested to learn how you forged/ground this and made the base of the fuller wide and the tip of the fuller narrow.

 

Cheers,

 

--Dave

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"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Thank you for the comments! The customer loves the sword, I was able to deliver it in person which made the transaction even better since you can see the first reaction when they see and handle the sword for the first time.

 

The pommel was pretty fun to make! I still need to work on fitting two piece pommels together and get a cleaner look, on the next one of course.

 

Dave, I can share what I know about grinding fullers. I'm working on some blades that I'll be posting progress pics/steps of so I think that it would fit in really nice in that post. Forging the fuller is still the hardest part for me, you can't tell by looking at it but I welded an twisted inlay of my logo into the blade, funny how grinding makes things go away.... :rolleyes:

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That is beautiful work! Not a type I see very often, that pommel shape looks very challenging.

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Ut-oh, I thought 'regular' fullers were tapered! unsure.gif

wink.gif

 

 

tongue.gif

 

I meant parallel-sided fullers. wacko.gif I'm a bit lost in time at the moment, working on a 16th/17th century Bavarian broadsword with a 3/4 (more like 5/8) length fuller that doesn't taper much and it's coloring my reality. wink.gif It's a bastard sword that's really a bastard! laugh.gif I would expect nothing else from the new blade that fits the Guard of Guilt, though.

 

 

 

Michael, I keep looking at this one and still enjoy the "correct" fuller and hilt components. biggrin.gif

 

Regarding your post below, that's also my understanding. Sneaky so-and-so's, those Viking era smiths!

Edited by Alan Longmire
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Thanks for all the feedback once again! I look forward to sharing what I know about fullering, although I still feel like I have a far way to come until my fullers are at the quality and level that I would like them to be... Also somewhere I read that viking fullers were not a true radius but rather had a slight flat at the bottom so I might have to throw out everything I know and start from scratch once I can look at some originals.

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Wouldn't it be possible to forge in the fuller in the preformed sword blank which would be untapered in thickness, then grind in the thickness taper and therefore gradually reduce the width of the fuller over the length of the blade?

 

Awesome sword Michael, everything is smooth and sensual with like others said alot of "presence". The picture with the box is like, rooting around in an attic or old house somewhere and coming upon this awesome sword hidden away! Like everyone said, I bet that pommel was a challenge! How did you get the final finish on the hilt parts?

Edited by Sam Salvati

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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Wouldn't it be possible to forge in the fuller in the preformed sword blank which would be untapered in thickness, then grind in the thickness taper and therefore gradually reduce the width of the fuller over the length of the blade?

 

Awesome sword Michael, everything is smooth and sensual with like others said alot of "presence". The picture with the box is like, rooting around in an attic or old house somewhere and coming upon this awesome sword hidden away! Like everyone said, I bet that pommel was a challenge! How did you get the final finish on the hilt parts?

 

Yea, Same that is one way to do it. Makes it a bit easier if you are a stock removal guy. Its not bad to do on a power hammer with the right set up either. Or you can grind the whole thing in under an hour with a 2" small wheel on a decent sander.

 

Wow Michael. You must have done something right to have all of these firebeards posting kudos.

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