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Niko Hynninen

Tatara / tamahagane

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Hi.

 

I have bean busy!

 

 

Here is my project...Im happy whith the result.

 

My goal was run 200 kg of ore....but furnace was thinking other ways...so total amount was 80kg~

and bloom is 40kg

 

I find lots of info agane how this tatara works and I sure hope I get new chance whit it at some day.

 

But even my 200 kg plan did not work...is excellent steel and it looks like real tamahagane.

 

I hope you like....I do :lol:

 

Some pics

 

DSCN8455.jpg

 

DSCN8458.jpg

 

DSCN8540.jpg

 

DSCN8705.jpg

 

DSCN8707.jpg

 

DSCN8778.jpg

 

DSCN8868.jpg

 

DSCN8888.jpg

 

 

BR

 

 

 

 

Niko

Edited by Niko Hynninen

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Holy Cow, Nico! :blink:

 

Now THAT'S a tatara smelt! You did that by yourself? :ph34r:

 

Congratulations! B)

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Wow! If you're going to be working alone, I hope you have a power hammer to consolidate that!

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Wow!

you got some lovely colours! that's a beautifully constructed furnace. I'm looking forward to seeing what you make out of the bloom!

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Niko,

you are hard core!!!!!

 

that is the only tatara smelt I've seen that looks like an engine block after the furnace has been removed !!

 

The steel looks good ,when I first saw oxidisation colours in smelt steel I almost wet myself with joy !!!!!!! don't know why exactly but I found them very exiting (kind of like the real thing!!)??!!??

 

You have jewel steel .......

 

I think you are going to need an even bigger shelf !!!

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double wow from me and a bravo !!! ... :o

 

i don't know much about tatara but that is quite a construction job...

 

sweet that it turned out so nicely...

 

are you planning to make one of those long temple swords out of it... ;);)

 

 

 

fantastic

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Wonderful Niko!!!

:D

An impressive amount of work! :lol:

Congratulations!!

 

Antoine

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My hat's off to you, Niko. Simply fantastic.

Your perseverance never cease to amaze me.

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Hi.

I have bean busy!

Niko

 

 

Niko,

Fantastic! Your determination is being surpassed by your skill, wow. Congratulations Niko, you have raised the bar again...what will you be up to next time?

 

Jan

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Thank you all for most kind words.

 

I build tatara by my self and asked school friend to help whit smelt...my coal was that 200kg, I figured that help

might be in order.

 

I find agane the same thing...some way we need to get space bellow tuyeres totally empty to get room for bloom.

15 deg. angle was too small and they were bit too hi...heat was not enough to burn it to ash...that is most importat if we wanto get room for bloom. In japanese tatara wall are clay / Si sand...so it turns by it self to slag and bloom can grow side ways...If we use too hi temp bricks they just stay..In other hand we have to get that slag liquid enough to run it out...so there is lots ways to ruin the smelt.

 

Most interesting part of smelt was flame...CO flame. Its guite acurate how you can see if air amount is too big or you need to feed more ore / charcoal in.

 

 

Control of burn time ( one charge) is guite difficult...some point furnace just burns faster and next can be totally different.

My coal was to get 30min burn / charge but it was 20-10min...Furnace is living thing so control is more or less in both ways man and furnace. I used Fe3O4 magnetite that is bit over 70% Fe + Ti and V is as alloys...so this stuff is guite close to satetsu...but bit higher Fe%.

 

I think bigger charcoal burns slower....and air between layers / pokets lets the heat evenly in whole furnace, even the hot spot is right front of tuyeres.I had good coal...but I sould have get rig off smallest pit...I think they choke furnace.

 

Need to go trough my notes and try to figure is there other ways to make tatara that lets bloom to grow...its huge amount of work if its done from clay and sand only.

 

It was long day tooked me 22 hours continious work...my coal was 50h :) I think IF burn time would be 30 min / charge its possible to run it 50h and furnace need to be big..maby my tatara was too small for 200kg??

 

I would like to start forging the bloom to waffels..but now I have to make presentation of this all...

My dream is to forge big sword out of this material...japanese: katana / tachi...sanmai or kobuse...but its big projekt and need good prep.

 

It was fun...and even its lots of work and money is spend...I would not hesitate to do it all over ;)

 

 

Thank you all :)

 

 

Here is pic of spark.

 

DSCN8905.jpg

 

DSCN8914.jpg

 

[

BR to all

 

Niko

Edited by Niko Hynninen

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Niko, Sweet Tatara! Will be watching your work on this.

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Niko, that's amazing. Great job!

 

Jim

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Hi Nikko,

Glad to see you have realise you need some one to help. You can't load charcole then iron while checking the flame and open the beer at the end.

Looks really good.

Where have you found information on shapes of tatara? As I recently saw a site by Hitachi which gave abrief history of tatara. I came away with the impression that big tatara are very late. The furnaces used in earlier times were small and sometimes underground.

Andrew

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Hi

 

Andrew.

 

I have found info some books that i have and lots of time in internet too

At moment im trying to figure out other possible shapes and some how

chance the part bellow of tuyeres, so it would be free for bloom.

 

Japanese style tatara and older too are clay / sand...so it gives room as erosion eats it.

Modern HT cast´s and bricks dodn work same way.

 

Nobody should feel jealous...I share my info and maby it helps others too :)

 

And....im all ready planing new tatara...Yep...another obsession ;)

 

BR

 

Niko

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Hi

 

Andrew.

 

Nobody should feel jealous...I share my info and maby it helps others too :)

 

And....im all ready planing new tatara...Yep...another obsession ;)

BR

Niko

 

Niko,

I am not jealous as I know the amount of work involved. There are some real dangers you should be aware of.. what if suddenly you had a lifetime supply of Tamahagane and a lifetime supply of Wootz to be forged. Life would become stressfull and you would need a hobby.. a nice clean one like golf or something..... be careful Niko.

 

Regarding your furnace. if you want it to be authentic.. why not make the area in contact with the metal out of sand/clay and the rest of the box out of whatever.

 

Jan

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Niko,

 

very impressive what you have done, such a sweet looking furnace and such good steel.

I wish you all the best with your project.

 

Best regards, Cyrus

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Hey Niko-

 

Truly beautiful, superfine, wicked slammin' work!

 

I don’t know all that much about traditional tataras, but I do have some experience in giving blooms room to grow down (or rather, sink down so they can keep growing on top). I think you’re on the right track with the clay/sand erodable bottom .

 

But also , to let the bloom grow down I think it helps to have a very hot and dry bottom below the furnace. I know Kihara goes to great lengths to do this- burning and pounding the charcoal of a fire for hours even before building the furnace. I think a dry bottom is part of the idea behind the Scandinavian slag-pit furnaces also.

 

And then, once the slag begins to flow, I think it’s important to make sure it keeps flowing, so it continues to bring heat to the bottom of the hearth, and everything stays hot and soft enough to let the bloom subside. If you neglect this too long, and the slag freezes up, it’s very hard to overcome. Another reason it’s hard to do alone- it’s hard to keep the furnace charged and to keep the slag running too!

 

It is truly is a great and beautiful thing that you’ve done.

 

Lee

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Hi!

 

 

Jan.

 

 

There is all ways this risk...I would be in so much trouble if one day this all starts to feel

wain...But golf... :huh: Looks bit slow to my spirit...

But there is allways the autentic the acient way of making things....bellows, natural materials ;)

Would be interesting to.

 

I was thinkin this way too...but it needs some planing, but cant see why it would not work.

 

Lee.

 

I used metalsheet under the tatara...and inside is one layer of thin fire bricks to get hi temps..

I think metal worked fine and moisture was not able to get in side the hotspot...I was bit affaid if steem could explode under the tatara??

 

I think it would have been better if i have had 4 tap holes...not middle like now just 2 but at wall side just next to corner...or even 6, middle and sides...like japanese tatara..plast that this greates might effect charcoal burn the way its all most ash and bottom could be free?? It need some tought.

 

Thanks to all for kind words.

 

 

I had nice piece and it was 230g. Spark was totally hi side but not cast...

So in to the forge and some hammer to it..It starts to gruble quite easily, but I managet to hold it in one...

I made one fold...after I had cut it half whit chisel and used hammer to fold it back to it self...it acted quite nicely and just it was against other part it separated...but whit tongs i managet to get it in forge and make the weld.

Now its ~180g

 

Some pics.

 

 

DSCN8953.jpg

 

DSCN8985.jpg

 

BR

 

Niko

Edited by Niko Hynninen

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Niko

it looks like very nice steel... not too slaggy..

 

the top picture is cool... I think your going to have alot of fun with this project

 

good inspiration

 

Greg ;)

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Hi Niko!

The picture looks super. Realy. I like the way cementite is located. It should be easier to forge. But beware, it may be difficult in heat treatment.

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