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Well There is about 20 different ways, depending on the person who responds. Me I like to do a ferric chloride dip for a few seconds to a minute or two. Then a light rubdown with rubbing compound to remove the oxides and then I hit the blade with some pumice to remove the oils from the rubbing compound. I do this as I am approaching my final grits in a hybrid polish.

 

 

But like I said you will get many replys so try them all and pick the one that works for you.

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What John said there is basically my way too.

 

I will just add that I've spent way too much time trying to make a hamon 'pop' that just wasn't there in the first place. Maybe there are ways to make a weak hamon come out, but I havn't been too successfull. Better to take it back and re-do the heat treat sometimes.

 

Dan

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I've always tended towards hot lemon juice followed by a pumice rub, repeated as necessary

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So how do you make a hamon pop? I'd assume its not anything like a damascus etch but I'm really not sure

 

As has already been said, there is more than one way to accent a hardening line or hamon. I suspect that the multitude of techniques is centered around the fact that some procedures often yield slightly different responses depending upon the craftsman and that different steels/heat treating practices often make different demands. I use primarily low alloy steels which are not known to produce exceptional hamons. So, I have had to "jiggle the handle" on etching routines, polishing routines, and acid concentrations/types to get the results I like.

 

hirahamon1.jpg

 

This is 5160 done to a 1500 grit paper polish and then etched in an acetic, citric, and phosphoric acid mixture. Etching is done in hot solution with added soap to make the solution wet the surface and not make splotches or spots.

 

Yoroi6_Close.jpg

 

Another 5160 blade done the same way.

 

OSaBlack_F.jpg

 

 

This one also in 5160 done to 2000 grit and hot etched in a mixture.

 

I find that plain carbon steels (10XX) respond differently to etches than low alloy steels which may have resistance to specific acids/concentrations. As well, the crystaline structures of different steel types, heat treated in different ways, tends to make finding the optimal way of making the hamon pop somewhat problematic in that we need to experiment a bit to find what works best. Differentially hardened 5160 makes different demands than clay heat treated 1050 or W1.

 

I wish I could make it easy but life is never that way for me.... <_<

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Hi Sam. I have been on "Walk About" and have attempted to reinvent myself. :blink:

 

Funny how I feel so different yet seem to want to resume all the same old stuff with renewed vigor. The place has had a facelift. It looks nice. B)

 

Brian

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Man..I'm getting all sniffy getting such a nice welome back. :lol:

 

It's nice to be somewhere warm on the 'Net again. Somewhere where the information and spirit flows freely...not many places like that left anymore.

 

It's good to be back. B)

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Brian, I always enjoy your work, the Asian influences, good to see you posting again.

 

I have reinvented myself a dozen times and can only say go for it, life's to short to get caught up in a world your no longer excited to be in every morning. 3 times I left a comfortable life with nothing but a backpack and started over, every time it was a great adventure and still is.

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Hi Sam. I have been on "Walk About" and have attempted to reinvent myself. :blink:

 

Funny how I feel so different yet seem to want to resume all the same old stuff with renewed vigor. The place has had a facelift. It looks nice. B)

 

Brian

 

 

Awesome to see you back around Brian, I've been using your advice for a long time and it's always served me well.

 

Stephan

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