Jump to content

Forged Aluminum Platter


Recommended Posts

Hi everybody,

 

This is my completed Chrismas present for my dad. He collects various platters and serving trays and is rather Italian. Like, sits in his shack next to his house and cooks sauce with a wife beater on Italian. Like, Cadillac driving, gold chin wearing, Ravioli making, cursing at the Red Sox on the radio Italian. You get the idea.

 

He always serves a Caprese salad with every big holiday meal. If you have not had the pleasure, it is fresh Tomato, fresh Mozzarella, a piece of basil and olive oil. Sublime. I thought I might make him a platter to serve this salad on. And what's more Italian than a hand beat aluminum panel?

 

I used 6061 T6 Aluminum and the White Pine method of finding the correct forging temp. The size is 16" by 6". This was a first for me. I would love to hear your thoughts and perhaps some techniques you guys coud share.

 

Platter.JPG

 

platter 3.JPG

 

platter 2.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats really neat man, very pretty too! I've only ever cold forged aluminum, sounds very interesting forging it hot, not too hot though I'm guessing... Cool project!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Heck, you can be an OFFICIAL member of the family if you bring wine. We always have food to suit vegitarians, carnivores and those of the "chosen person" persuasion.

 

The Aluminum forged very well. As discribed to me by Blacksmith Derek Glazer, heat the aluminum until a white pine stick will leave a black smudge. That is forging temperature. Worked great. No cracks!

 

Thanks,

 

Nick

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a cool idea! Do you think the aluminum might react with the acidity of the tomatos and give you that tinny metallic taste aluminum drinking cups can impart to certain fluids? :huh:

 

My wife and I have Caprese Salad almost every day when the tomatoes are ripe. Fresh tomato, still warm off the vine, room-temperature fresh mozzarela, fresh basil leaf picked from right beside the tomatoes (and sometimes a little fresh oregano), a bit of extra-virgin oil, and a nice glass of wine on the screened-in back porch....Yum!

 

Almost makes me miss hot weather. Almost. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a cool idea! Do you think the aluminum might react with the acidity of the tomatos and give you that tinny metallic taste aluminum drinking cups can impart to certain fluids? :huh:

 

My wife and I have Caprese Salad almost every day when the tomatoes are ripe. Fresh tomato, still warm off the vine, room-temperature fresh mozzarela, fresh basil leaf picked from right beside the tomatoes (and sometimes a little fresh oregano), a bit of extra-virgin oil, and a nice glass of wine on the screened-in back porch....Yum!

 

Almost makes me miss hot weather. Almost. ;)

 

That is a good point Alan. I will have to lay some tomatos down on it and see if there is a taste issue. I suppose I could get it clear anodized if that is an problem.

 

Nothing like fresh tomatos and basil. I have been referring to the basil plant as a pesto plant all summer.

 

Thanks for the comments.

 

-Nick

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been a while since I've had the pleasure of your dad's hospitality. I'd like to come see this platter in action. Too bad I haven't brought that forming stake to the shop yet. Ithink it would have been just right. ~Herb

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not worry too much about tomatoes, but mozzarella takes metallic taste pretty easily; this is why I never cut fresh cheese with carbon steel knives.

You have to make a try to see if it's a real problem. In this case you could try to melt some tin in the platter, in the way it's done with copper. Maybe it works..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...