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Three forges in less than a year; maybe I got a keeper.


jarrett
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Nothing revolutionary here. I had built a forge a few months back trying a removable/sand bottom for forge welding. It worked but was extremely inefficient and took a lot of fuel. SOOOOOO.......

 

Built a new one with a more tried and true design. I debated on a vertical versus horizontal and decided on the horizontal for the lenght it affords. I've got sufficient materials to build a vertical one later. What you see in this first pic (on the left)is my origianl purchased forge, bought in January of this year. It works good and will weld, but its not quite large enough and it too looses much heat with the open design.

 

I built the air tank model on the righ with the intent of using it for forge work and welding so I beefed up the floor. Here is the spec; 1" inswool all the way around, 1 1/2 inch fire brick on the bottom and 1" inswool from the 8 oclock to 4 oclock. Then 1" of castable refractory on top of the brick and up some of the walls. Then coated all wool with satanite. Then (yes theres more) I put about 1/2" of bubble alumina on the floor and up the sides a little. Went through air drying and then fired it slowly. Recoated the sides with castable today. Whew.

 

It gets hot fast and takes so little fuel to operate. Extremely low PSI. Using two venturi burners built from parts at the hardware.

 

Can't wait to put it to work. I've got 5 blades I'm working to get finished by Christmas so there is no time for forging now until after Christmas

 

both forges from front.JPGhorizontal forge.JPGhorizontal forge heating up.JPG

 

All the refractory I purchased from Ellis Knife works.

Edited by jarrett

CUSTOM KNIVES BY JL RHODES

JLRKNIVES

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

God bless you. I thank God every day for the freedom to spend time with those I love, and time to pursue this craft.

 

"Adversity is a test for strong men."

"What one man can do, so can another."

"NO excuses, just do better next time."

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Glad to hear you're building a new set-up. I'm in the process of building a new forge as well. My Horizontal has 2" of insulation and satanite al lthe way around. it gets plenty hot enough to burn steel and can easily weld, but it takes a while to get to that heat and I'm limited with only 12" if usable pace inside. I've also got a wicked hot spot in the center that makes larger blades difficult.

 

I've decided to do a Vertical forge with a pass through design so my length is unlimited. I'm using a a propane tank as a body (fork lift style, not BBQ). I've got it cut up with a removable bottom for replacing inulation anda removable top so I can easily use it to heat and hold a crucible.

 

It seems like every forge I make is closer and clsoer to what I'm looking for.

Have you ever thought about the life of steel? It's interesting to think that you can control the fate of a piece of metal.

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Nice forge. Have fun with it. I would just like to mention something, that I have mentioned before. It makes things a little easier. Get some high alumina castable. Its pretty flux resistant. I think Darren has something. Make the bottom of the forge round like the rest. No bricks or anything in there. Now mix up the refractory, put wax paper in the bottom of the forge and then pile in a bunch of refractory. Shape it as you like and bring it up the walls a little, so it acts like a cup to catch any flux. Let it dry and then fire the forge and cure. You may have to experiment with what ever refractory you get on the curing as to not get it to crack. Anyway,the paper burns away and you have a flux resistant removable bottom. You could even make a couple to have spares for when one fails or breaks. Hope this helps.

 

Tony G

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Good advice. Thanks. I believe now that I read about using the paper and making removable bottom; though this time I didn't use it. I bet I remember when I have to fight with it to make any repairs.

 

This forge is 21" long. I put the burners in at an angle; get an nice vortex effect. There are still hotspots but on the off blast side, the heat is pretty well distributed.

 

When I started this, (in addition to welding) I had in mind being able to heat treat longer blades in the future should I advance to that. I wanted to heat the whole thing at once; something hard to do with my small forge. After the build started, I came across the large duncan kiln on ebay that I got for a steal. I have to add that it is awesome; heats up relatively quickly and provides a smooth even heat.

 

So now, in retrospect I could have gone with a vertical forge and the pass through design. Those seem like they would be the most efficient design and really provide a nice even heat. Next time maybe.

 

You know, for me, the tool design: build: critique/improve: rebuild better cycle is a great part of this.

CUSTOM KNIVES BY JL RHODES

JLRKNIVES

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

God bless you. I thank God every day for the freedom to spend time with those I love, and time to pursue this craft.

 

"Adversity is a test for strong men."

"What one man can do, so can another."

"NO excuses, just do better next time."

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Good advice. Thanks. I believe now that I read about using the paper and making removable bottom; though this time I didn't use it. I bet I remember when I have to fight with it to make any repairs.

 

This forge is 21" long. I put the burners in at an angle; get an nice vortex effect. There are still hotspots but on the off blast side, the heat is pretty well distributed.

 

When I started this, (in addition to welding) I had in mind being able to heat treat longer blades in the future should I advance to that. I wanted to heat the whole thing at once; something hard to do with my small forge. After the build started, I came across the large duncan kiln on ebay that I got for a steal. I have to add that it is awesome; heats up relatively quickly and provides a smooth even heat.

 

So now, in retrospect I could have gone with a vertical forge and the pass through design. Those seem like they would be the most efficient design and really provide a nice even heat. Next time maybe.

 

You know, for me, the tool design: build: critique/improve: rebuild better cycle is a great part of this.

I am building a verical forge with a pass through design. I made it out of a 1/2 of a 100lb gas bottel it is 18" high 36" round

it has 2" of koawool on the inside a 1" air blower burner . how munch satanite and tic 100 do I need to coat it.

Al High

It good to be a knife maker

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Al,

 

I referenced Darren Ellis sight for all my refractories. Look in his FAQ for calculations. Here is the link. http://refractory.elliscustomknifeworks.com/

 

Hope this helps. I am not using a blower, so I've got two burners. I've considered adding forced air. Maybe later.

CUSTOM KNIVES BY JL RHODES

JLRKNIVES

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

God bless you. I thank God every day for the freedom to spend time with those I love, and time to pursue this craft.

 

"Adversity is a test for strong men."

"What one man can do, so can another."

"NO excuses, just do better next time."

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