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Jameasun

Cricular saw blades?

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More junk steels... I am going to make up some leather working knifes. In particular what they call a round knife or head knife. Thinking of using some old used up circular saw blades. I was just wondering if anyone knew the type of steels used in these blades? brands I have on hand are skill, dewalt, and irwin of which most are plywood style 60 tooth or more. Thank you for your input...

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I have no clue about the saw blades, but I have to say that I can't wait to see the head knives you come up with. My parents just bought me one a few months ago, but if they hadn't I would have been hitting up some bladesmiths to see if I could have one made. I will probably still end up doing that, I just can't justify it at the moment :P

 

~Noah

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I would stay away from the blades with carbide teeth . I think those might be a milder steel than the other type .

I could be all wrong though , I haven't tried making anything out of them ,

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Circular saw blades made for modern table saws are usually laminated and made from alloys not suitable for making knives using traditional heat treating methods.

 

I often see new makers scrounging for steel on the forum. This is fine if you happen to have a lot of suitable scrap steel (i.e. leaf springs, files, etc.) laying about, but if not why not just order some new steel? 10xx steel is dirt cheap. I mean really cheap. A 12" chunk of 10xx steel costs less than a couple of cups of Starbucks fancy espresso drinks.

 

This is just my two cents, but it seems to make sense to me that when you're starting out, you want to eliminate variables which might cause failure. Knowing what steel you are dealing with, and knowing that it is annealed, etc. goes a long way toward eliminating said variables.

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

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As with any unknown steel test it. Test it for the presence of carbon and if it hardens. If I am just making a tool/knife for myself then I recycle a lot of tool/carbon steel.

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Many years ago I dug around and found that the backing metal used in saw blades of this type and metal cutting bandsaw blades, the steel that the carbide teeth are welded to, is 6150 or something similar. Tough, heat treatable, not a super steel but suitable for its intended purpose.

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I made a 'kitchen' knife from a 7 1/4" saw blade about 20 yrs. ago. Recon I didn't temper quite high enough - dropped on concrete floor and the tip broke off. Reground it. Is my favorite kitchen knife - holds a good edge for a long time.

ksb

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Any modern circular saw will be crappy steel with carbide teeth and not suitable for a knife. If you use unknown steel then the heat treat, the most critical part of knifemaking, will be left to random chance. Save yourself the headache and just buy bar stock. Its about $4.00 for enough 1080 to make a knife.

 

http://alphaknifesupply.com/bladesteel.htm

 

 

They ship flat rate.

Edited by JCWalker

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Come on guys, think about this for a minute. Even if it is a carbide toothed saw blade, the body of it has to be heat treated and tough to stand the shock and vibration and rotational stress of a saw blade in action. It might not hit HRC 65 when you quench it, but chances are it will get reasonably hard, and if you experiment with it most any saw blade will make an acceptable knife blade. It may not be the last word, but they aren't crap, either.

 

You cannot say as a blanket statement that they are, or aren't good steel, nor what kind of steel they are, in today's world. There are (and have been) a good many different saw companies, and they use lots of different kinds of steel. Sometimes it's a proprietary material, more often it is an off the shelf stock steel, and the choice is driven by the bottom line.

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I second that. I hope they are good because I just finished up a few blades made from circular saw scraps & 1080. I like quenching the whole blade and shattering it to bits, then stacking them up and welding/folding until I have a few nice layers. These are old sears blades from the 50s and maybe a little later.

Edited by toxonix

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See this thread for pics:

 

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=15686

 

This is from OLD circular saw blades, 8 and 10"

I can't say whether newer saw blades would be any good, but I wouldn't go buy them off the shelf to make knives. New steel doesn't have the same allure as old stuff does, even though the alloys might be similar or the same.

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On 1/1/2010 at 10:06 PM, Jameasun said:

More junk steels... I am going to make up some leather working knifes. In particular what they call a round knife or head knife. Thinking of using some old used up circular saw blades. I was just wondering if anyone knew the type of steels used in these blades? brands I have on hand are skill, dewalt, and irwin of which most are plywood style 60 tooth or more. Thank you for your input...

I purchased a French Model Round knife from Terry Knipschield about a year ago. I truly love this knife. Terry is well known, in the leather & knife working field. He has a web site Knipschield Custom Knives. He has pictures and tells you what kind of steel he used on each knife. On the one I purchased he used ATS 34 or CPM 154CM high carbon stainless steel. It is heat treated to RC-60.I am not a knife maker, but I can say this is one beautiful knife. The information that I gave you is on his web page. Take a look at his web page, there is a lot of information on it. He is a really nice guy, I am sure he will answer any questions you may have.

Jim

IMG_0651.JPG

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On ‎1‎/‎2‎/‎2010 at 10:09 PM, Howard Clark said:

Come on guys, think about this for a minute. Even if it is a carbide toothed saw blade, the body of it has to be heat treated and tough to stand the shock and vibration and rotational stress of a saw blade in action. It might not hit HRC 65 when you quench it, but chances are it will get reasonably hard, and if you experiment with it most any saw blade will make an acceptable knife blade. It may not be the last word, but they aren't crap, either.

 

You cannot say as a blanket statement that they are, or aren't good steel, nor what kind of steel they are, in today's world. There are (and have been) a good many different saw companies, and they use lots of different kinds of steel. Sometimes it's a proprietary material, more often it is an off the shelf stock steel, and the choice is driven by the bottom line.

I agree with Howard as "never say always".  However I'm not a fan of "mystery steel" either.  The cost of the steel  is but a small part of the value of any knife.  Why not purchase new steel that you know exactly how to  H/T?

 

Just my $.02.

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i know the recommended method is to get known steel, but if that is not an option to you, as it isnt to me, then reclaimed steel is a viable option. 

ive made a couple of knives from some an old saw blade, it must be at least 2 feet in diameter. non carbide tips. i cleaned off the surface rust and took a file to it and it skated right off the bat. so the knives ive made out of it so far i havent even heat treated. i just did some stock removal, careful not to heat and lose the hardening. they are plenty tough, take a hell of a beating and retain their edge pretty well. only issue i have with them is i just cant seem to get them scary sharp. i can get them to shave, but i know i should be able to get them sharper then they are. 

so my next plan for this steel is to anneal it, then work the steel, then re heat treat and see where i end up at

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Sounds like an older blade and just as a SWAG I'd take a small sample and go through, starting with an anneal, the sequence for L6 and water quench then break it to see what the grain is up to and go from there.

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