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Had a chance to play in the forge this weekend, and had a go at making some spirograph damascus.

 

not quite there yet, but not far off.

 

big thanks to Mick Maxen for helping me understand the theory of the stuff

 

000_1116.jpg

 

000_1121.jpg

 

000_1120.jpg

 

thanks for looking :D

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i'm probably wrong, but i'd imagine he made a straight laminate billet, forged it approx to shape, doodled on it with a spirograph forming the pattern, traced the spirograph pattern with a dremel or some sort of cutting tool, then re-welded it and the pattern came out, a bit more like mokume then western "damascus"

but like i said, prolly wrong.

 

pretty dang cool though

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i'm probably wrong, but i'd imagine he made a straight laminate billet, forged it approx to shape, doodled on it with a spirograph forming the pattern, traced the spirograph pattern with a dremel or some sort of cutting tool, then re-welded it and the pattern came out, a bit more like mokume then western "damascus"

but like i said, prolly wrong.

 

pretty dang cool though

 

If you are serious with this theory then you are way off base and most assuredly wrong.

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try and keep the overly aggressive and offensive posts to a minimum, its just as valid a theory as anyone else's who doesn't know for certain.

 

if you know, than how about you share information instead of knocking on others suggestions?

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If I had to guess...

 

Make 4 jelly rolls, forge weld the 4 together ala explosion pattern but square with 15n20 (or similar high contrast material) in the inner surfaces, then forge them on the bias, followed up with laddering. Something like turkish ribbon, but starting with jelly rolls. Am I on the right path? Even close?

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If you are serious with this theory then you are way off base and most assuredly wrong.

 

 

well, it would work.

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Ooh i diddnt mean to start a argument :mellow:

 

as to how its made - no one is close yet, and i was sworn to secrecy :ph34r:

 

 

 

but like richard said the low layer count makes it a bit easyer to figure.

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Hey, don't be calling me richardlaugh.gif.... See your starting all kinds of trouble here Tobyrolleyes.gif

 

I think the original layers need to be perpendicular ? not on the bias... can you answer that ?

 

and now I'm rethinking that... this is a teasertongue.gif

 

thanks, Dick

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Devin Thomas demonstrated this pattern, which he came up with, at Batson's Hammerin one year, but I got lost and with my crs, it is just a social memory now. Sorry. I think it has something to do with the band pattern that Rick Dunkerly came up with for the mosaics which would involve a four way twist, but can't dredge up any more, getting old, sorry.

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try and keep the overly aggressive and offensive posts to a minimum, its just as valid a theory as anyone else's who doesn't know for certain.

 

if you know, than how about you share information instead of knocking on others suggestions?

 

I wasn't knocking or being aggresive with my reply, I just wasn't sure if it was a serious post. If a billet were made by the suggested method then when the bevels were ground the inlayed material would be ground away and there would just be straight layers of steel.

 

I do know how to make this pattern but made a promise to Devin that I would not reveal the proccess to anyone. Toby is very close to getting it right and if he wants to reveal his proccess the that is up to him, but I will not.

 

Omalley,

it was not my intention to offend you but as I pointed out your theroy will not work unless you can do it with very little grinding after you have have done the reweld.

Edited by Bill Burke
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It's actually a easy pattern to do.

 

Devin has freely shared for years and is a great guy. Some of the small time damascus sellers have copied his patterns too close. His own brother has really done him wrong also. This is not good.

 

Edit to add; Toby, you pretty much got it, in a low layer kind of way :)

Edited by Don Hanson
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Hey Don thanks :D

 

since having a go at this pattern i have recently seen photos of how its done,

 

and apart from being massively low on the layer count it looks like it would benifit from welding in a can with a press.

 

all my welds have been done wet and drawn under a power hammer (dont have a press and have yet to try welding in a can :) )

 

 

 

 

also.. i really dont want to tread on anyones toes, being on the other side of the pond i dont know Devin (or any of you guys apart from Don Fogg) you mostly seem to be giants from all the way over here. i dont want to become known as a spoiler (i had second thoughts after publishing my results with the feather W's - just got excited that it worked :P )

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Tony, no problem and I do not think you're treading on any toes. I just like to see credit giving to the folks who did it first and then shared with us. Sorry I chose your thread to voice the wrong doings to Devin Thomas.

 

it looks like it would benifit from welding in a can with a press.

I do all my mosaic can welding and drawing with the power hammer and tend to use my press very little ;)

Edited by Don Hanson
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Hello:

 

A lot of these mosaic patterns will be in book IV..it's the "It's a SECRET" attitude that motovated me into writing my books in the first place...

 

Like Dave S. in his 1095/SS welding outside a can..I have been welding ss and HC steels without a can for decades...no one asked me how so I saw no reason to mention it...if someone asks..I tell them...it's that simple..

 

Personally I am not a "fan" of mosaic welding in a can..I look at it as "cheating" in a way. If JJ Perret can do downright remarkable work in the 18th Cent as far as pattern welding goes..who needs a "can"..???But since it is all the current "trend" I will be including it in book IV.. "Secrets" be damned...

 

Anyway that's the way I see it...

 

JPH

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Awesome job. Thats a really nifty pattern. Gonna have to mess with some of that when I get money for supplies agian.

 

I have to say I feel pretty much the same as JPH on the "secret" attitude, it just somehow feels a bit inappropriate. When I figure out how to make that unobtanium blade that reaches RC75 and bends 100* without taking a set.....be damned sure I'll be here telling everyone how. :) But thats just me, and I might be drunk on this whole sharing thing.

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i dont want to become known as a spoiler (i had second thoughts after publishing my results with the feather W's - just got excited that it worked :P )

 

Well, I'm sure glad you did share that one. I learned a great deal from it and I'm currently in the middle of making a short sword using your methods.

 

Keep sharing your methods if you can dude. I, for one, really appreciate it.

 

--Dave

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Share away! Just because you tell someone how something is done does not mean that very many people will be able to actually do it (or if they use the technique, that it will look anything like what you make when it is put in context of the whole knife/sword)!

 

We all have to learn somewhere - just give credit! (or, in my case, still need to learn somewhere).

 

OK - those were general comments.

 

Specifically - that is a really nice start to whatever you are making. I hope to see more, soon. thanks.

 

Kevin

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)
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