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double hamon?


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working on a seax blade recently, forged out of a huge old file. i think its pretty close to 1095.

 

i edge quenched it in veg oil. i know it hardened pretty well because it skated a file and after i tempered it, its tough as anything. bends to about 25 degrees with no deflection.

 

polished it to 400grit and gave it a wipe down with a cloth soaked in dilute FeCl. at first i saw a straight line right along where it went into the oil like i expected, but after a couple etches and sanding the oxides off, i see a little very thin hamon right on the very edge in the middle of the blade. this one is way foggier and more active. more like a hamon looks when you clay a blade, rather than an edge quench hamon. now its easier to see the little hamon than the straight hamon. i dunno if i didnt soak the blade long enough in the forge? or if its anything to worry about.

 

what do you think made this happen? :blink:

jared Z.

 

lilzee on britishblades.

 

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

-Sir Winston Churchill

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That means you did the thermocyling correctly. B) You got the grain size down low enough to reduce hardenability to the point where you not only got a simple edge quench line, you got a true hamon in the transition zone. This is a good thing!

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it's hard to tell without seeing the blade, but i think that if the quench line fades with further polishing, but the 'hamon' gets clearer, it's possible that the quenchline is just a surface phenomenon, and the hamon is where you actually hardened the blade - this can happen if you drop the hardenability too far through normalising, or if you didn't get it quite hot enough or soak long enough before the quench. it's a problem i've had with oil quenching 1095, and is fixable with a longer soak.

 

basically it is not a problem if the blade is fully hardened up to the quench line, but if not and the natural hamon is too close to the edge, you can quickly sharpen through the hardened portion.

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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I've seen this more than once quenching W1 in oil. I would think that the W1 has to drop below the nose pretty fast to get any hardening, so I'm not sure if what looks like a secondary transition zone is really a different structure throughout or something like air hardening on the surface. I'll see if I can find some pics to see if we're talking about the same thing.

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thanks for the replies guys. :)

 

i know i normalized it at least 4 times throughout making this blade, so the grain size should be pretty small. i'm not too worried about whether it hardened well enough because i've already tested the bejesus out of this blade, and im just going to destroy it testing anyway.

jared Z.

 

lilzee on britishblades.

 

From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.

-Sir Winston Churchill

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