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DFogg

1080 heat treat

7 posts in this topic

I've been using 1080 on a project and am having trouble getting a reasonable degree of hardness.  Here's my set up: basically the blades are stock removal type because i am still working on setting up a forge, and the heating is done via a furnace with digital temp control.  i've been attempting to water quench from about 800-815C(1500F) and am only getting a hardness of about 50Rc(measured on a machine). Thanks for the help.

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What size on the blades, lenght, width and thickness?

 

Where are you testing on the blade to get that hardness?

 

Did you get a spec sheet with the steel?

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All the work i have been doing hase been using the mechanics lab/workshop i have at school.  The spec sheet says 1075-1080 and i ordered it from admiral steel.  The blade is 8 inches long, the spine tapers from 1/4 to about 3/16 and the edge is about 1/10-1/16 thick. Its a simple one edge straight dagger profile.

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And the machine is a diamond tipped hardness tester set up for the Rockwell C scale. I dont know any other specifics, but i did successfully harden a tool i made from D2 to about 61-62Rc with an air quench from 1875F (same digital furnace).

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its probably also worth mentioning that because of the way the furnace is set up(closed door), that i have no idea when the blade is up to temp and it is put in the funace and left there for about 15 minutes so the funace and blade can come back up, I would say its in the low orange range when it comes out(although i have only a small amount of experience judging colors).

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The reason I asked about where you took the hardness test is that it is convient to test on the flats of the blade, but it might not have through hardened to the thicker sections. You should check the edge with a file.

 

The second consideration is how quickly you were able to get the blade to the quench. You have very little time to do this and if you were to delay for a few seconds the blade could drop below critical.

 

The last situation is that it is difficult to work with a closed oven. Blades tend to scale and decarburize in that environment. You might possibly have some decarb and that would through off the RC test.

 

Last you did not mention tempering. If you tempered the blade what times and temps were involved?

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