Jump to content

swiss army knife copied from romans??


Recommended Posts

hey guys, I just found this and thought it a rather unique item, opens up a whole new view of ancient luxury items

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1247230/The-Roman-Army-Knife-Or-ingenuity-Swiss-beaten-1-800-years.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am very interested in that knife!

I found the info's on the BBC video's and had opened a thread on a French knife forum :

for the peoples understanding French :

http://forum.neoczen.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=12666

 

thank you very much Pat B. to have placed the reference! :D

Edited by Jacques Delfosse
Link to post
Share on other sites

all the discussion is just going around that fork...

but forks ware yet known by ancient Egyptians!?

and the description said : coming from around the Mediterranean Sea... :rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites

glad i could show everyone something that sparked a good conversation topic :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very enteresting. You know, when I first read the heading, I thought that someone had been smoking something that they shouldn't have been smoking. Goes to show ya that a lot of "modern" products have a lot, sometimes a whole lot, longer lineage that we think.

 

Doug Lester

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very enteresting. You know, when I first read the heading, I thought that someone had been smoking something that they shouldn't have been smoking. Goes to show ya that a lot of "modern" products have a lot, sometimes a whole lot, longer lineage that we think.

 

Doug Lester

 

 

haha only thing smoking bere is the coals in my forge, and sometimes the hair I lose from back drafts.. :P I agree though, there are almost no "modern" inventions, most of the time its a modern take on a ancient work

Link to post
Share on other sites

Are wonderful knives, I have seen many pictures in internet then I think they were very popular.

A few years ago when I saw for the first time a similar knife, I thought it was a fake because I saw the fork...but apparently the Romans knew too :D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why should we think that it is a fake because of this fork ?

I guess that Chinese knew how to make a fork without wanting or needing to use some instead of sticks.

Just a question of habits and culture.

 

I can't follow people saying fork was invented so late when trident seem to be an emblem for ancient gods

 

Just my 2p

 

Stéphane

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why should we think that it is a fake because of this fork ?

I guess that Chinese knew how to make a fork without wanting or needing to use some instead of sticks.

Just a question of habits and culture.

 

I can't follow people saying fork was invented so late when trident seem to be an emblem for ancient gods

The trident is a fish spear, not an eating fork. The spoon and knife are very old (knife the oldest tool, some 2 million years old, spoon at least 5000 years old), but the fork was added to our cutlery at the end of the medieval period (or so I thought until seeing this one). Then you first see prickers with just one tine, then two and multiple. The exception is large meat forks, supposedly used to get boiling meat from the pot/kettle, which you see from the bronze age onwards (roughly 1000BC).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Come to think of it, Pat, some of my wilder ideas have come while inhaling charcoal smoke :rolleyes: .

 

Doug Lester

 

 

lol oh I can agree with you there, all those impurities make for some fun mental processes... although often the projects they spawn are incredibly random

Link to post
Share on other sites

received today from Mrs. Lucilla Burn from the Museum in Cambridge (UK) :

 

"Object in Focus: The Roman ‘Swiss Army Knife’

What is it?

 

This is a combination eating implement, its folding parts comprising

– a knife blade (incomplete)

– the bowl of a spoon

– a three-pronged fork

– a spike

– a spatula

– a pick.

The first three implements have obvious uses as cutlery. It has been suggested that the spike implement could be used for extracting meat from snails, a use for the pointed ends of Roman spoons suggested by the Roman poet, Martial, in one of his Epigrams. The small spatula could be used for extracting paste such as garum, the Roman fish paste delicacy, from narrow necked bottles. The curved pick could have served as a tooth pick. The knife blade is made of iron and the rest of the implement is silver, the fork and spoon rotating on a hinge at one end so one or other becomes part of the handle when not in use. Near the centre is a small flat knob which fits through a lyre design at the end of the fork and when turned locks the fork against the handle. The other implements are held with rivets between a folded sheet of silver, in the centre of which is another cut-out lyre-shaped design.

 

Date?

We do not know where it originated. A similar object has been found in a third-century A.D. burial in Thrace (Bulgaria). This date would agree with the style of the spoon bowl and designs on the handle seen on other Roman artefacts.

 

How rare is it?

 

Roman forks are extremely rare but folding spoons and folding knives (like modern pocket knives) are relatively common. However, only four of these multi-combination implements have so far been discovered. The most elaborate one has seven attachments including a sieve. They are in several senses the ancestors of today’s Swiss army knife and the fact that they folded suggests that they were made for travelling, as a kind of convenient picnic set, or a modern soldier’s knife, fork and spoon that clip together. But they and the folding spoons and knives cannot be considered as Roman ‘army issue’ because they have not been found on military sites. They do however show that that the Romans were capable of inventing implements of surprising ingenuity.

Apart from the damaged bowl and the broken blade, the implement is in a good state of preservation and shows little or no sign of wear in antiquity. Perhaps it was always regarded as something more to admire than to use.

 

Swiss Army Knives

 

These were patented by Karle Elsenener in 1897 and many thousands are still manufactured daily in Europe’s biggest knife factory. The most elaborate Swiss army knife has thirty-three functions. "

Link to post
Share on other sites

Can opener? Where are the most essential survival parts, the bottle opener and cork-screw? ;)

 

 

not necessary with amphora's and barrels:rolleyes: :rolleyes::rolleyes::D

I'm curious to see how the actual copy (Spanish)will be!

I must receive it soon...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Id love to make one... and might do so when I have the time.. college and whatnot...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...