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Last year I made a couple dozen file guides and there were a few interested people that didn't get one in time before I took a break from them. If there are 10-12 people interested (seriously)then I can machine up some. They're $36 which includes US and Canadian shipping. Made from low tempered S7 and O1 guide pins.

 

fileguide3-1.jpg

 

Squaring up shoulders.

 

fileguide4.jpg

 

Setting and keeping a clean straight riccaso.

 

fileguide5-web.jpg

 

This one is a very old one that I still use. It's for illustration only and the new ones will not look like it.

Edited by B Finnigan
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I got one last year and love it. :D

Steve

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A couple people got them and JB welded thin carbide strips to one side for grinding. Although I doubt either of them re-surfaced the strips since you would need a diamond abrasive. I do grind with mine and if you're moderately careful you won't gouge out the guard. If you just slam it up against the side of the platen it will scratch and lose the precision edge.

 

You can buy the guides elswhere with the carbide strips on but you will fork over around $150.

 

A trick to use is to grind the teeth off one edge of the files you will be using. You still have the other edge to use if needed. Then the file slides across the guide with little or no resistance.

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I bought one last year and love it. However, in my infinite wisdom, I scratched up one side of it with my grinder thinking, I'll just be careful. How wrong I was. I still have one good side, but put me down for a fresh one. Shoot me a paypal request or pm me.

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I bought one last year and love it. However, in my infinite wisdom, I scratched up one side of it with my grinder thinking, I'll just be careful. How wrong I was. I still have one good side, but put me down for a fresh one. Shoot me a paypal request or pm me.

 

You can grind it flat again if you have a mill or surface grinder. Or know someone that does. It's very low temp tempered and very hard but still workable.

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Couple of questions please.

Will the new ones have guide pins and springs?

I guess I don't understand low temp tempered.What is the aprox hardness and will a file cut it?

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Yes guides, no springs. Low temperature tempered means the emphasis is placed more on hardness then flexibility like you want from a blade. I have a couple guides that are 5160 and not tempered at all. But I have snapped one like glass from over tightening it onto the blade. At a 400 deg (F) temperature S7 specs say it's 57-59 HRC. A file will leave scratches but the guide will beat up a file if you drag the teeth across the edge.

 

I have not seen any need for springs but they could be added without and modification to the guide.

Edited by B Finnigan
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ouch, plans are 20$ each ;)

 

honestly for something like this, its cheap enough to just pay the man, consider your hours of reverse engineering, making the damn thing, then fixing it if you messed up, and still having a product likely inferior to the one he has perfected.. Pay yourself an hourly wage as a knife maker, mine currently is 20 an hour.. more when I improve, and figure out if its worth it to you to make your own tools, or buy them.

 

plus, I don't know if he'll take it this way, but asking for plans of how to make a product someone is selling is often considered poor form :)

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Fortunately I am not wound that tight and anything I post I have no problem with someone copying. I have already mentioned the two steels I use and the HT'ing process. The pics should be enough to serve as a tutorial. If not then you might want to tackle a different craft.

 

A step by step tutorial is too easy and will not stretch your brain enough. Growth and skill come from having to chew on a certain aspect of a project for a couple days. Most of my growth and knowledge has been from tackling something that I am really not sure how to complete it. But I dive in and work through it.

 

The most important aspect of a file guide it get it dead nut even. If not you will end up with gaps on your guards. Very visible gaps and the accompanying loss of a tight fit a guard must have.

Edited by B Finnigan
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Fortunately I am not wound that tight and anything I post I have no problem with someone copying. I have already mentioned the two steels I use and the HT'ing process. The pics should be enough to serve as a tutorial. If not then you might want to tackle a different craft.

 

A step by step tutorial is too easy and will not stretch your brain enough. Growth and skill come from having to chew on a certain aspect of a project for a couple days. Most of my growth and knowledge has been from tackling something that I am really not sure how to complete it. But I dive in and work through it.

 

The most important aspect of a file guide it get it dead nut even. If not you will end up with gaps on your guards. Very visible gaps and the accompanying loss of a tight fit a guard must have.

good point! i assumed there would be some super secret part in their that i would not have thought of. i have the steel that looks perfect for that just lying around. sorry to be annoying!

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ouch, plans are 20$ each ;)

 

honestly for something like this, its cheap enough to just pay the man, consider your hours of reverse engineering, making the damn thing, then fixing it if you messed up, and still having a product likely inferior to the one he has perfected.. Pay yourself an hourly wage as a knife maker, mine currently is 20 an hour.. more when I improve, and figure out if its worth it to you to make your own tools, or buy them.

 

plus, I don't know if he'll take it this way, but asking for plans of how to make a product someone is selling is often considered poor form :)

good points and sorry if i offended you. you are probably right, but i like to make things rather then buy them.

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I post as many home built tools as I do knives in hopes that more people will do it. By using our expensive equipment for branching out to other projects you end up learning skills that will carry over into knife and sword making. It also helps to justify the more expensive equipment that we usually have to save up for eons to buy. I look at working my shop as fun and relaxation and don't figure in a per hour amount on most projects. That's even the case when I am selling tooling.

 

And when mass producing something boredom will set in. Then it's time to take a break. For me it's always going to be a hobby first.

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I got one last year and Love it, downside is friends come over and I have to pull it off of current work so a friend can use it to file a knife.

So put me down for another.

Chris

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