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Hogan Baker
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Ok well the knife that I have been working on (Found here... : http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=16198&st=0&p=150833entry150833 )

 

Any way, I got the blade polished up to 1000 grit and I thought I saw a hamon, which was really odd since I did a full quench with out any clay. ( I known, I chickened out, I didn't clay it up like I had planed on, but I really am planing on differentially hardening my next) So I etched it in vinegar for an hour. It revealed some terrible (I think) things. The following pictures are of what the blade looked like after the vinegar and steel wool.

 

This first picture shows a crack (?) near the plunge cut. It also shows some of the small hamon that extends through the middle of the blade about half way along the length. It is hard to photograph.

 

crack, hamon.jpg

 

The next three pictures are showing the black lines that are in the blade. They are mainly only in the tip of the blade.

 

cracks 1.jpg

cracks 2.jpg

cracks 3.jpg

 

The blade is forged out of w-1. I had some troubles during my first heat treat (it warped) so I normalized once, straighted, normalized again, and then quenched again. I was quenching in water. It was tempered at 450, then a soft back draw was taken with a torch. It flexes over the knee fairly well, it cut through a 2x4 and the edge defection over a brass rod looks pretty good.

 

I don't really know, but I conclude that the "hamon" up the middle of the blade was from me not heating the steel thoroughly. The blacks lines, i figure must be small cracks in the steel. Possibly created by forging too cold? The really odd thing is that I had the blade polished so that I could see my face in it, I would have thought that I would have seen any flaws then.

 

My questions are pretty odvious, is this blade ruined? (I sure hope not, having put maybe 15 hours into it already. I work all by hand so it takes a lot longer..) What caused it? How can I avoid it?

 

Thanks,

 

Hogan Baker

Edited by Hogan Baker

"Stale water is poor drink. Stale skill is worse. And the man who walks in his own footsteps only ends where he began."

 

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I'm definitely no expert but maybe the black marks near the tip are alloy banding that developed during the multiple heats? Though looking really closely at the pictures I can see possible cracking so you may have hit it on the nose (no pun intended.)

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I believe the black lines are nothing significant. They can be polished off with no damage to the blade. It should be fine, I have seen this before.

“Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick.”

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I cleaned the blade of with soapy water first. And then just put it in a pan filled with vinegar for an hour-ish.

 

Tomorrow I suppose I will try to polish it off.

 

Thanks, I will let you know what happened.

 

Hogan Baker

"Stale water is poor drink. Stale skill is worse. And the man who walks in his own footsteps only ends where he began."

 

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I hope that does polish out. I've had a blade of 5160 show cracks on polishing and with a light etch as the interior of the cracks became darkened then as the surface was shined back up, bam, there they were.

 

These marks on your blade don't really look like the cracks my blade suffered though. Which I decided were caused by cold forging.

 

Hope it works out.

CUSTOM KNIVES BY JL RHODES

JLRKNIVES

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

God bless you. I thank God every day for the freedom to spend time with those I love, and time to pursue this craft.

 

"Adversity is a test for strong men."

"What one man can do, so can another."

"NO excuses, just do better next time."

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I once had a blade that did that. Mine turned out to be cracks from to quick a quench. I hope thats what yours are. Kinda odd that alloy banding would show up just in one spot like that.

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Well, I had gotten all of the cracks out of the blade, polished up to 1000 grit, finished the guard, worked on the handle, and then I though, "what the heck, i'll do some more 2x4 chopping". It Broke. I hit a knot in the wood while swinging as hard as I possible could, and I left a piece in the wood...

 

Thinking back, I have no idea why I chopped another 2x4. I had already done two. Plus i had almost finished the knife, and on top of all that, I purposefully tempered it on the hard side....

 

I guess that teaches me that I should only do my testing before I spend 20 or 25 hours working on a knife.

 

Anyway, tomorrow I figure I might as well break it all the way. I will try to do a 90 degree bend and see what happens. I may take a video.... What other destructive tests do you guys do with your defective blades?

 

Anyway, thanks for trying to help me with it....

 

Hogan Baker

"Stale water is poor drink. Stale skill is worse. And the man who walks in his own footsteps only ends where he began."

 

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for every crack that you did see ... there are others that are laying in wait.

its not just a matter of grinding off the ones that are obvious ... its a sign that something didnt go right and the steel was over stressed

 

so really, the only test i would do for it and learn anything from ... is snapping it in half and taking a look at the grain

you can see how you are affecting the steel and thats really about it.

 

sorry it broke.

:(

deeDWF4.jpg

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