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BSA Metalworking merit badge


Gregory Lirot
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I have been toying with the idea of teching the metalworking merit badge to my scout troop for a while now, and may finally do it. i have to get my dad certified as the merit badge counselor thingy but i would provide the skills and tools. i know the requirements are something really simple like a coat hook and ashtray. does anyone have advice on what tools to bring/ not bring? i know i am going to make EVERYONE bring saftey glasses, a hammer they can handle (about 1lb), heavy work boots, gloves and a signed permission slip. i think i need to bring my materials (like 1/4in mild steel and 1/2in mild steel) tongs, my forge, PPE and anvil.

"I have surprised myself with what I can make with simple tools when a definite need arose. I don't think a man knows what he actually can do until he is challenged."- Dick Proennke

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The ABS does some forging events for kids etc .... and if im not mistaken, they just did some scout thing ..

maybe you can contact someone from there to discuss what they found handy, useful, needed, legally required etc ?

 

you might even be able to get some of the abs guys to come help.

 

just a thought.

^_^

deeDWF4.jpg

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The ABS does some forging events for kids etc .... and if im not mistaken, they just did some scout thing ..

maybe you can contact someone from there to discuss what they found handy, useful, needed, legally required etc ?

 

you might even be able to get some of the abs guys to come help.

 

just a thought.

^_^

that might be a good plan, thanks a lot. i do not plan on making small children sharp pointy things though! i bareley trust myself with them you know :lol: i know that this will have to have all the normal scout saftey things (permission slips, waivers PPE and parents). although, i can't think of too many smiths in my area who can help me out, most are an hour or so away. :(

"I have surprised myself with what I can make with simple tools when a definite need arose. I don't think a man knows what he actually can do until he is challenged."- Dick Proennke

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yeah .. i know how it is.

 

i used to demo at a museum for the school kids ...

we had to rope of an area .. i had to have a lanyard on my hammer .. the forge and my anvil had to be on concrete ..

plus there had to be a someone standing nearby with a fire extinguisher.

there were some other strange rules that were imposed upon us .. but i cant remember them all.

 

im sure that the scouts would enjoy it .. and they obviously will be able to tell you what will be needed and all that.

 

good luck.

:)

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yeah .. i know how it is.

 

i used to demo at a museum for the school kids ...

we had to rope of an area .. i had to have a lanyard on my hammer .. the forge and my anvil had to be on concrete ..

plus there had to be a someone standing nearby with a fire extinguisher.

there were some other strange rules that were imposed upon us .. but i cant remember them all.

 

im sure that the scouts would enjoy it .. and they obviously will be able to tell you what will be needed and all that.

 

good luck.

:)

this was't even my idea. i am the troop blacksmith (not officaially of course :lol:). one of my fellows asked me ifi could run a project for out venturing crew (scouts 14-18, including me) to do this. i will probably do it at the scout house in the driveway (if i am allowed to) since it is far enough away from the building and is concrete. thanks for the ideas, now i have to do more research on all the rules!

"I have surprised myself with what I can make with simple tools when a definite need arose. I don't think a man knows what he actually can do until he is challenged."- Dick Proennke

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no power hammers lol. where are you located ?

"fire can be a tool of destruction or creation, the difference lies in the hands of those who wield it". me

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The current BSA requirements for the Metalworking MB are much more complex than they used to be. Get a merit badge pamphlet before you go any further down this road... I think you'll need more materials prep than you indicated.

The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

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The current BSA requirements for the Metalworking MB are much more complex than they used to be. Get a merit badge pamphlet before you go any further down this road... I think you'll need more materials prep than you indicated.

 

from the BSA website:

requirements for the Metalwork merit badge:

0. Read the safety rules for metalwork. Discuss how to be safe while working with metal. Discuss with your counselor the additional safety rules that apply to the metalwork option you choose for requirement 5.

0. Define the terms native metal, malleable, metallurgy, alloy, nonferrous, and ferrous. Then do the following:

0. Name two nonferrous alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers. Name the metals that are combined to form these alloys.

0. Name three ferrous alloys used by modern metal workers.

0. Describe how to work-harden a metal.

0. Describe how to anneal a nonferrous and a ferrous metal.

0. Do the following:

. Work-harden a piece of 26- or 28-guage sheet brass or sheet copper. Put a 45-degree bend in the metal, then heavily peen the area along the bend line to work-harden it. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point in this unworked piece of metal.

. Soften the work-hardened piece from requirement 3a by annealing it, and then try to remove the 45-degree bend. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.

. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. Using hand tools, make and temper a center punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel.

0. Find out about three career opportunities in metalworking. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

0. After completing the first four requirements, complete at least ONE of the options listed below.

0th. Option 1 - Sheet Metal Mechanic/Tinsmith

Zero. Name and describe the use of the basic sheet metalworking tools.

Zero. Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.

Zero. Make two objects out of 24- or 26–gauge sheet metal. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Construct these objects using a metal that is appropriate to the object's ultimate purpose, and using cutting, bending, edging, and either soldering or brazing.

Zeroth. One object also must include at least one riveted component.

Zeroth. If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel or tin-plated sheet steel, preserve your work from oxidation.

0th. Option 2 - Silversmith

. Name and describe the use of a silversmith's basic tools.

. Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet silver. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.

. Make two objects out of 18- or 20- gauge sheet copper. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Both objects must include a soldered joint. If you have prior silversmithing experience, you may substitute sterling silver, nickel silver, or lead-free pewter.

. At least one object must include a sawed component you have made yourself.

. At least one object must include a sunken part you have made yourself.

. Clean and polish your objects.

0th. Option 3 - Founder

〇. Name and describe the use of the basic parts of a two-piece mold. Name at least three different types of molds.

〇. Create a sketch of two objects to cast in metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.

〇. Do the following:

0. Make two molds, one using a pattern provided by your counselor and another you have made yourself that has been approved by your counselor. Position the pouring gate and vents yourself.

0. Do not use copyrighted materials as patterns.

0. Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using a mold provided by your counselor.

0. Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using the mold that you have made.

0th. Option 4 - Blacksmith

0. Name and describe the use of a blacksmith's basic tools.

0. Make a sketch of two objects to hot-forge. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.

0. Using low-carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick, perform the following exercises:

0. Draw out by forging a taper.

0. Use the horn of the anvil by forging a U-shaped bend.

0. Form a decorative twist in a piece of square steel.

0. Use the edge of the anvil to bend metal by forging an L-shaped bend.

0. Using low-carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick, make the two objects you sketched that require hot-forging. Be sure you have your counselor's approval before you begin.

〇. Include a decorative twist on one object.

〇. Include a hammer-riveted joint in one object.

Preserve your work from oxidation.

 

It looks like i will need to bring my rivet bucking block and a few rivets now plus the brass or copper sheets. ^_^

"I have surprised myself with what I can make with simple tools when a definite need arose. I don't think a man knows what he actually can do until he is challenged."- Dick Proennke

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And have all those little sheet pieces pre-drilled or punched to save time with the boys. I demo'd both hot-rivet as well as pop-rivets when I did this a while back. Of particular note, is getting them to create a design idea before they show, or schedule 2 events - the first to teach them the basics, the work hardening/annealing stage, and rivets... and then have them come back to do their forged items.

 

It's a lot of fun, but more work than just cutting up a couple tin cans (like it used to be).

The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

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And have all those little sheet pieces pre-drilled or punched to save time with the boys. I demo'd both hot-rivet as well as pop-rivets when I did this a while back. Of particular note, is getting them to create a design idea before they show, or schedule 2 events - the first to teach them the basics, the work hardening/annealing stage, and rivets... and then have them come back to do their forged items.

 

It's a lot of fun, but more work than just cutting up a couple tin cans (like it used to be).

that is what i was planning on doing. i think that i should first find out exactly how many people are going to come, then see if i need to make it over two days. i know i need to have them plan out what they want to do, then make them simplyfy it to meet what they are capable of. Although, i would put the riveting in the same time as the hot work stage and put all the talking and verbal requirements with the work hardening/anealing day. the pre punched holes sounds like a great idea to save time (and a headache :lol:)

"I have surprised myself with what I can make with simple tools when a definite need arose. I don't think a man knows what he actually can do until he is challenged."- Dick Proennke

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  • 4 weeks later...

I just started Blacksmithing a year or 2 ago and the last 2 years have helped teach the Blacksmithing portion of the Metalworking merit badge at the scout camp up in Jupiter, we had about 14 kids the first time and about 20 last time, some as young as 11 or so. Most had never picked up a tool, but they made up fot it in enthusiasm. I would say go for it, you will need help as its hard to keep an eye on more that 3 or so by yourself. We had 5 forges going at once and a guy like me at each one to keep an eye on them. Was a good time.

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