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finished tsuba


jake cleland
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i think i'm about done with this one. now that i know what i'm capable of, and where my skill level lies at the moment (very near the ground), i'll put a lot more planning into the next one, but i'm comfortable with how it turned out.

 

frog tsuba 1.jpg

 

frog tsuba 2.jpg

 

as always, comments, criticism, suggestions etc welcomed.

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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Very nice, Jake. Thanks for sharing.

 

-Todd

www.toddblades.com

 

"Geometry says how sharp, steel says how long." - Roman Landes, Ashokan 2009

 

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."

 

- George Orwell

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Beautiful, very nice work, with a little natural patina, it will look perfect. Congratulations, and thanks for sharing.

Yann Reynal De Saint Michel.

www.atelierdeyann.fr
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Quick question, isn't the hole for the blade to fit in upside down, don't you want the art to right side up?

or is it like that so you would see the tsuba when it is worn blade up fashion?

Karl

 

a tall glass of milk... just a quenching medium for hot cookies.

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Quick question, isn't the hole for the blade to fit in upside down, don't you want the art to right side up?

or is it like that so you would see the tsuba when it is worn blade up fashion?

 

 

It is a common mistake to want to look at it as you suggested. I did plenty of that myself at first. If you look at all originals you will then see the way it is supposed to work.

Grey hair and alopecia are signs of age, not of wisdom...

Rósta að, maðr!

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you are quick Jake,

I think it is really good for you first... I think the frog has a cartoon feel to it... I think your observations you asked of Jim in his engraving thread will make the next one come out much better... the fooling of the eye by a hint of a line or shadow.. I would bet you already see how to improve it.... thanks for showing ... it is honorable to post something you feel is not the best you can do in order that the rest of us can learn too .... thankssmile.gif

Dick

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From a bear to a frog; it's a miracle!

 

Jake, I think it's an excellent first effort. You're a quick study. The balance of the composition is very good. The inlays were ambitious, and for pieces that scale, well done with limited tools. You learned a lot. Your frogs look like frogs and the hawk looks like a hawk. The texturing is effective and the water well done with just a hint. The one line across the seppa-dai seems a little invasive.

 

One of my first engraving jobs was a small single-shot pistol and the customer wanted an animal inlayed in gold so I put in a wolf head. When I showed it to him he asked if it was a pig! :lol:

I still don't think it was quite that bad but it taught me how demanding those small bits are.

 

Keep up the good work.

 

Jim

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  • 3 weeks later...

jake, how did you get the patina/texture/color on this. I have made a few crude tsuba with modern engravers, that are slick mild steel with gun bluing on them and then let them rust for a while. They are ok, but nothing as artful as this.

 

(Laughing) I work at a truck repair shop with a limestone rock parking lot, old washers and metal lay out here and get a very old look to them pretty quickly, getting run over and rained on, I have thought about just leaving my tsuba in the parking lot and letting mother nature to the work. Just curious how you got it to turn out so great. Looks marvelous.

 

Besides Patrick Hastings and Ford Hallman (sP?) I don't get alot of information on the topic to study by. I love their work. Ford has a few youtube videos, but not many. Looks like I'm going to be admiring your stuff now to.

(which have been for a while- your blades).

 

Scott

Scott Hale - www.halestormforge.com

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thank's for the kind comments, everyone. Scott, i used a combination of rusting and etching with ferric vinegar and nitric to set up the surface of the steel, and then used multiple applications of gun blue, followed by boiling and oiling.

Jake Cleland - Skye Knives

www.knifemaker.co.uk

"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler."

"Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."

 

Albert Einstein

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Scott, Jake says it's OK for me to post a link to a tutorial I did on rust patina on a wrought iron tsuba, based on a Japanese formula. I haven't tried this on mild steel, but would be interested to hear others' results.

 

HERE is the link.

 

Jim

 

 

jake, how did you get the patina/texture/color on this. I have made a few crude tsuba with modern engravers, that are slick mild steel with gun bluing on them and then let them rust for a while. They are ok, but nothing as artful as this.

 

(Laughing) I work at a truck repair shop with a limestone rock parking lot, old washers and metal lay out here and get a very old look to them pretty quickly, getting run over and rained on, I have thought about just leaving my tsuba in the parking lot and letting mother nature to the work. Just curious how you got it to turn out so great. Looks marvelous.

 

Besides Patrick Hastings and Ford Hallman (sP?) I don't get alot of information on the topic to study by. I love their work. Ford has a few youtube videos, but not many. Looks like I'm going to be admiring your stuff now to.

(which have been for a while- your blades).

 

Scott

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lol if your skill level is at the ground mine must be six feet under. really nice work

"fire can be a tool of destruction or creation, the difference lies in the hands of those who wield it". me

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