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I was talking with a friend of mine about the queching method we saw in many youtube video (also for katanas) for the carbon steels. first of all they uses warm oil (60° C) as a qunching medium. when the blade is at the right temperature, then they put the bevel in the oil for 3-4 seconds, then they pull out of the oil it for other 3-4 seconds and finally put all the blade in the oil letting it still for a longer period. end of quenching.

now I understand clearly that first edge quench. this will give a harder edge and a softer spine. simple.

 

my question is: why they pull out the blade for a while before diveing it completly in the oil??? why don't they simply wait the first edge quench and then put immediatly all the blade in without extracting it from the oil???

 

we could't find any reason...

Edited by loneronin
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Without being able to understand the commentary, all I can figure is that he is checking for warpage (though on a blade that small warping is not going to be a big factor). I edge quench most of my blades. I use a stop plate to control the depth of the quench and immerse the blade and hold it until I can see the spine go dark, then immerse the whole blade to finish it. On a longer blade I will pull it from the quench and check the blade for warping after 2-3 seconds, since you can correct some things right then.

 

I do have two other comments on the video. I think his quench tank should be much closer to the oven, he seems to take a long time to get to the quench, and particularly on a small blade you don't want to waste any time. Second, by taking the blade out into bright sunlight you lose any chance to see the spine go dark, meaning that he probably hardened the spine as well as the edge.

 

Just my .02

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Without being able to understand the commentary, all I can figure is that he is checking for warpage (though on a blade that small warping is not going to be a big factor). I edge quench most of my blades. I use a stop plate to control the depth of the quench and immerse the blade and hold it until I can see the spine go dark, then immerse the whole blade to finish it. On a longer blade I will pull it from the quench and check the blade for warping after 2-3 seconds, since you can correct some things right then.

 

I do have two other comments on the video. I think his quench tank should be much closer to the oven, he seems to take a long time to get to the quench, and particularly on a small blade you don't want to waste any time. Second, by taking the blade out into bright sunlight you lose any chance to see the spine go dark, meaning that he probably hardened the spine as well as the edge.

 

Just my .02

 

Yes, I agree the quench tank is too far from the owen and wrongly in the sunlight. I prefer to quench and forge late in the evening, or at least after the sunset.

thanks for your considerations about the quench-stop to check warpage.

Edited by loneronin
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