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Readily Available Quench Oil Found


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First, I'm not a rep for this company but wanted to let everyone know about this. They have this in stock and its readily available.

 

Today though I came across Tulco Oils. They make a wide line of oils but what were interested in is their quench oils. I talked with one of their techs and he suggested two of their quench oils for knife making application. Indicated it is used and named several well established companies.

 

One is a 16 second oil, with a viscosity of 104 SUS @ 104 F, flashpoint is 392.

The other is a 9.5 second oil, with a viscosity of 90 SUS at 100 F, flashpoint of 365.

 

I will be testing out the first one soon (using O1) because it was the slower acting oil. It also more resembles type A in color. The rep said the other is much much darker. I've not been able to find a spec sheet on Type A anywhere. Did notice the viscosity is identical to the Parks 400 at same temperature.

 

If these test out I'll let everyone know. Or if anyone has prior experience with these, what is your experience/opinion.

 

I've used Goddards Goop in the past and then switched over to used peanut oil. I wanted something more reliable and predictable so I've looked high and low for Texaco Type A and equivalents; no luck. Ellis Knifeworks site is currently out, and through the 6 different distro's I spoke with across the whole western half of Arkansas it can be got but only by special order and in large quantity from one distributor I found. The others were not so helpful.

Edited by jarrett
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If I remember correctly Ed Caffrey uses Veterinary grade mineral that can be bought at most farm and feed stores .

He says it is very similar to Texaco Type A. I uses peanut oil with good results.

Steve

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  • 3 months later...

Well, any update?

 

 

Apologies for not following up sooner. The results are good. I've quenched about 6 knives so far; made of O1, 5160, and 1080, and 15N20. They have all turned out really well. I've tested them with rope cutting and slicing, hacking two by's, cutting leather, edge flexing, stabbing a board and chipping it out; you know, the usual stuff. The oil has not flamed up yet when doing multiple quenches.

 

I'm liking it. The same company makes a faster quenching oil. I'm going to go back and get some of it soon just to do some comparisons of the two and try to learn a bit more about quenches and how much difference the "speed" of the oil really does make.

 

I don't have a hardness tester, but the qualitative tests so far are good. I've not put a blade through a complete ABS test yet but will soon.

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  • 1 month later...

Apologies for not following up sooner. The results are good. I've quenched about 6 knives so far; made of O1, 5160, and 1080, and 15N20. They have all turned out really well. I've tested them with rope cutting and slicing, hacking two by's, cutting leather, edge flexing, stabbing a board and chipping it out; you know, the usual stuff. The oil has not flamed up yet when doing multiple quenches.

 

I'm liking it. The same company makes a faster quenching oil. I'm going to go back and get some of it soon just to do some comparisons of the two and try to learn a bit more about quenches and how much difference the "speed" of the oil really does make.

 

I don't have a hardness tester, but the qualitative tests so far are good. I've not put a blade through a complete ABS test yet but will soon.

 

The slow oil is essentially a 100 SUS mineral oil with no additives. The second oil is a medium speed oil that gets its speed using an additive (the reason it is darker). There are a variety of quench oils available that would work well for your application. I am a bit biased in my choice but I work for one of the largest suppliers of quench oil in the world.

 

For information regarding the effect of oils on hardness and similar things - I would suggest reading Houghton on Quenching (I can email you a copy if you want - just send me an email or note smackenzie@houghtonintl.com). There is another reference book which is really excellent called the Handbook of Quench and Quenching Technology by G. Totten. I am working with George now to rewrite that book and update it with the changes that have occurred in the past 20+ years.

 

Scott

Overview Quench Oils.pdf

Edited by kb0fhp
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Pardon me if I missed something, but where did you buy the oil? Direct from Tulco's website?

 

 

I found it at a distribution site in Fort Smith, Arkansas.

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The slow oil is essentially a 100 SUS mineral oil with no additives. The second oil is a medium speed oil that gets its speed using an additive (the reason it is darker). There are a variety of quench oils available that would work well for your application. I am a bit biased in my choice but I work for one of the largest suppliers of quench oil in the world.

 

For information regarding the effect of oils on hardness and similar things - I would suggest reading Houghton on Quenching (I can email you a copy if you want - just send me an email or note smackenzie@houghtonintl.com). There is another reference book which is really excellent called the Handbook of Quench and Quenching Technology by G. Totten. I am working with George now to rewrite that book and update it with the changes that have occurred in the past 20+ years.

 

Scott

 

Thank you for the input. I would like the information. I will contact you.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Yes you did. If I did not thank you at the time, I am deficient. It was/is extremely helpful.

 

Again, thanks.

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Would Houghton Quench 100 be a good choice for steels like O1, O2 and 1.5052?

 

I am not familiar with DIN 1.5052 - is it similar to AISI 52100? Or could you give me a composition?

 

O1 and O2 should be hardenable in thin sections with Houghto-Quench 100. It is the extra V (O1) and Mn (O1 and O2) that makes it better than 1090 steel and more hardenable. It should work.

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I am not familiar with DIN 1.5052 - is it similar to AISI 52100? Or could you give me a composition?

 

O1 and O2 should be hardenable in thin sections with Houghto-Quench 100. It is the extra V (O1) and Mn (O1 and O2) that makes it better than 1090 steel and more hardenable. It should work.

 

Thanks KB0fhp, you say houghton 100 will work, do you think there is another houghton product that will work better? I'm asking since I'm about to order some hougton 100.

 

I'm sorry, I now see I totally misspelled one of the steels. should have been 1.2550: C:0.55/0.65, CR:0.9/1.2, V:0.1/0.2, T:1.8/2.0

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Depends on what you want (see - you can never get a straight answer from a metallurgist :) )

 

If you are looking to get the O1/O2 hard I would suggest using Houghto-Quench 100. The steel that you just cited has a very high hardenability because of the Cr and V. The V and W (Tungsten) will make nice carbides and help retain a nice edge. However, if you ever want to do lower hardenability alloys you will have a problem getting the lower hardenability parts hard. You may want to consider Houghto-Quench G - this is a medium speed oil that will get the high hardenability parts hard and should get your low hardenability parts hard too.

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Depends on what you want (see - you can never get a straight answer from a metallurgist :) )

 

If you are looking to get the O1/O2 hard I would suggest using Houghto-Quench 100. The steel that you just cited has a very high hardenability because of the Cr and V. The V and W (Tungsten) will make nice carbides and help retain a nice edge. However, if you ever want to do lower hardenability alloys you will have a problem getting the lower hardenability parts hard. You may want to consider Houghto-Quench G - this is a medium speed oil that will get the high hardenability parts hard and should get your low hardenability parts hard too.

 

Thanks kb0fhp,

 

I'm really looking for a good oil for O1/O2 and 1.2550. I do use simpler steels like W2 and 1.2210 (silver steel), but these steels I water quench (with an additive) so far never had a cracked blade. Thank you for your detailed answer!

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