Jump to content
Jared Stier

hand and a half seax?

Recommended Posts

Or am I just looking at the blade wrong?

looks to be about 12-13" total

 

 

 

salisbury22.jpg

Edited by Jared Stier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jared, from what I've gathered from other threads on the seax they often had long handles. It supposidly made them more controlable than a 4-5" handle. From some of the pictures that I've seen of museum specimens the tangs seem to be rather long on most of them.

 

Doug Lester

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jared, from what I've gathered from other threads on the seax they often had long handles. It supposidly made them more controlable than a 4-5" handle. From some of the pictures that I've seen of museum specimens the tangs seem to be rather long on most of them.

 

Doug Lester

 

I just have not seen one this long. It looks like there is an extra 2.5 - 3" past where a hand would hold

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the pommel still looks in good condition

i know!

I am just going by the length of the guys arm for my guestamtions. But i am wanting to make a reproduction of this so im trying to get as close to the size as i can for the handle. I think i might be on the right path unless someone else has an idea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the pommel still looks in good condition

 

As does the ferrule/guard, and the fittings on the sheath. Odd.

 

I've never been a fan of saex type weapons...but that one is sort of inspiring. I keep saying it though...I've got a thing for short blades with long handles lol.

 

Very cool =D.

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could it be made from a broke sword?

 

There would be no way to know that without getting up close with the blade.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As does the ferrule/guard, and the fittings on the sheath. Odd.

 

I've never been a fan of saex type weapons...but that one is sort of inspiring. I keep saying it though...I've got a thing for short blades with long handles lol.

 

Very cool =D.

 

Cris

Honestly Chris, I don't know if its reproduction parts or not. But I am going to try and make it as close to the same length as possible. I have not seen a blade so short with such a long handle before. I believe this was found during the era Norse occupation of Ireland from the pictures are provided on the forum somewhere. I am going to make it as close as I can, and I might be able to get the museum its located in this summer for an up close peak if I get more cash put together

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly Chris, I don't know if its reproduction parts or not. But I am going to try and make it as close to the same length as possible. I have not seen a blade so short with such a long handle before. I believe this was found during the era Norse occupation of Ireland from the pictures are provided on the forum somewhere. I am going to make it as close as I can, and I might be able to get the museum its located in this summer for an up close peak if I get more cash put together

 

That would be very, very cool. If you do...keep us posted on it. This is honestly the first seax I've ever been very interested in lol (though I've seen some VERY nice ones made on this board, of course...and appreciated them!).

 

It's kind of funny...I had an idea in my mind for a relatively short bladed double edged dagger, in a 'viking' sword type style but with a very long, tapered hilt, rather than the short, stubby viking style. I even began the blade...but soon other things caught my interest and it was never finished.

 

I think this reminds me a little of that...

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jared,

I am making a langsax for someone right now who requested the old-style, almost 6" long handle.

 

here is a good thread about them at another forum.

http://www.myarmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=1039&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=seax&start=44

 

there are a few good ones here. search seax in the forum area and then look through the ones with the most replies that appear on topic.

 

Plus, Jeroen, I believe, included some good info and pics here on this site.

 

It seems strange to make a handle this long, but look at the tang on a lot of the old ones, they had to have really long handles. I just don't know how to go about shaping it...

 

Please keep us posted. I am especially interested in seeing the outcome.

 

Kevin

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I seem to recall in Jeroen's files a seax with both blade and grip around 20cm / 8in long. It was a continental style without pommel and guard, though. Where'd you find that one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I seem to recall in Jeroen's files a seax with both blade and grip around 20cm / 8in long. It was a continental style without pommel and guard, though. Where'd you find that one?

 

Jeroens files :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or am I just looking at the blade wrong?

looks to be about 12-13" total

That's the Salisbury sax. It's either a narrow or early light broad sax. The hilts on these are usually around 15cm in length, later broadsaxes and longsaxes had much longer hilts. I should have got some more pictures of the Salisbury sax if you're interested.

 

We recently had some good discussions on narrow saxes and longsaxes, with lot of information:

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=15413

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=15743

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeroen,

thanks very much for the info. It is appreciated.

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome, thanks for the insight, I will adjust.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeroen how long would you say the Salisbury seax is? I have other pics from your files, but I cant get a graps on the actual length

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a nice specimen...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once I got past looking at the seax and the spearpoints, I put my forensic osteology skills to use. Conclusion: That guy had a rough life!

 

Badly healed fracture of the right upper arm, massive osteoarthric lipping on the lower vertebrae and what looks like one fused vertebra indicating lots of carrying heavy loads (not to mention constant back pain with limited mobility), and if you look at the skull you'll see why he ended up in the ground: a sword or axe blow across the bridge of the nose angling downwards into the head, effectively severing the upper jaw from the skull. Death would not have been instant, but would have been (and still would be) inevitible within minutes. :ph34r:

 

Looks like perhaps a broken right collarbone and some cuts to the ribs as well.

 

Just guessing from the teeth and pelvis, he was around 35 to 40 years old. That was late middle age for the time, so the status of that seax was probably earned the hard way. Looking at the muscle attachment points, he was strong as an ox. He had pretty good teeth, too. Probably from a high-ranking warrior class, but not so high that he didn't have to work very hard. A man to respect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once I got past looking at the seax and the spearpoints, I put my forensic osteology skills to use. Conclusion: That guy had a rough life!

 

Badly healed fracture of the right upper arm, massive osteoarthric lipping on the lower vertebrae and what looks like one fused vertebra indicating lots of carrying heavy loads (not to mention constant back pain with limited mobility), and if you look at the skull you'll see why he ended up in the ground: a sword or axe blow across the bridge of the nose angling downwards into the head, effectively severing the upper jaw from the skull. Death would not have been instant, but would have been (and still would be) inevitible within minutes. :ph34r:

 

Looks like perhaps a broken right collarbone and some cuts to the ribs as well.

 

Just guessing from the teeth and pelvis, he was around 35 to 40 years old. That was late middle age for the time, so the status of that seax was probably earned the hard way. Looking at the muscle attachment points, he was strong as an ox. He had pretty good teeth, too. Probably from a high-ranking warrior class, but not so high that he didn't have to work very hard. A man to respect.

 

I would agree with all of that except for the age, I was thinking more like 30, but you do have a few years on me doing that stuff so I will go for it. Judging by the size of the arm compared to the seax I figured it about 21", assuming the 9th

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeroen how long would you say the Salisbury seax is? I have other pics from your files, but I cant get a graps on the actual length

I don't have the exact measurements on it, but I'd say in the order of 40cm. That's the usual size of these saxes. I know size memory doesn't work very well, but I remember that when I saw it it didn't strike me as a particularly large sax.

 

N.b. it might be worthwile asking the Salisbury Museum, and see if they can provide the measurements (ask for the knife of the Salisbury Saxon warrior, excavated at Ford, Laverstock near Salisbury in 1964).

Edited by Jeroen Zuiderwijk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the info :)

Edited by Jared Stier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright well the Museum was not very helpful, infact down right rude to me, but I believe I have all the information I need to start this. As well as a buddy brit who is going to sneak me some up close shots. So hopefully should have something to show in a few weeks.

 

Jeroen, you said you were pretty sure it was not pattern welded correct?

Edited by Jared Stier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright well the Museum was not very helpful, infact down right rude to me, but I believe I have all the information I need to start this. As well as a buddy brit who is going to sneak me some up close shots. So hopefully should have something to show in a few weeks.

 

Jeroen, you said you were pretty sure it was not pattern welded correct?

Yeah, they didn't start patternwelding saxes until the 8th century in longsaxes. Narrow saxes such as this one frequently had the blade decorated by engravings though (see Petr's narrow sax f.e.). I don't know if the british ones did have the engravings (haven't seen well enough preserved examples for that), but examples from the Netherlands and France do have it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...