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2010_10_14MapleForHandles400.jpg

We are complying with the new rural fire code... taking out a maple that would hinder a fire truck... I'll select some sections for waxing and storing for a couple of years - then dig into them for handle material.

 

I have some dogwood that is only a few inches thick, but nice and burly, that has been curing for 2 years... and some maple crotch wood <cough><cough>... and some other oak etc. that our property makes available.

 

Any pointers on the angle of a cut for a burl or crotch wood to get interesting handle grain are most appreciated!!!

Edited by Michael Kemp

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Michael Kemp

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For a burl just about any cut is good, first try using either a power washer (easy way) or screwdriver to peal the bark off the burl. If you find spikes under the bark then you can get 2 different grains. If you what more eyes in the grain cut across the eyes, if you want more lines (kinda like fiddle back) then cut parallel to the spikes.

 

For the crotch I would cut down so I cut through both of the branches of the "Y" Does that make sense??? in other words if the crotch is like this "Y" you want to cut down from the top so the chain saw goes through both of the top arm and down through the middle.

 

Home this helps

G-

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Hey Michael

You will get the best figure if you cut the crotch like I have shown in these pictures.

When you cut down through the Y it really shows the feathered grain.

Only don't use a splitting wedge like the caveman did in this example(yours truely)

Use a saw and it will be useable

Good Luck

Steve

DSC02230.jpg

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Edited by bronzetools
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  • 3 years later...

OK - 4 years later - I spent some time the last week making little pieces of wood out of big pieces of wood. The dogwood burl (2008) is pretty subdued - and the smaller pieces would not make a full sized handle all on their own. These are sanded with a dull 36 grit - then wiped with floor wax to slow the indoor drying.

 

Dogwood.jpg

 

The oak crotch wood I've gotten into so far is from mid-sized trees - all these are oversize for a handle - same treatment as the dogwood:

 

Oak.jpg

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Michael Kemp

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"OK - 4 years later".... wow!

 

This is cool to see, thanks for posting. That oak looks good. Dogwood on the right side, too.

I have always thought that one man of tolerable abilities may work great changes, and accomplish great affairs among mankind, if he first forms a good plan....

- Benjamin Franklin

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